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« — (j — • 

SAN    FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC    LIBRARY 

SAN  FRANCISCO  HISTORY  ROOM 

REFERENCE    BOOK 

Not  to  be  taken  from  the  Library 

SAN  FRANCISCO  EDITION 


BERNARD   McDONALD 

Deputy  Chief 

He    Will   Retire   in   March. 


LOUIS  DeMATTEl 

Inspector,  S.  F.  P.  D. 

He  Will  Retire  in  February. 


They  Will  Go  Fishing  Soon 


DECEMBER.   1952     •    JANUARY.   19C3 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


EDGERTON 
BROTHERS 

LUMBER 
COMPANY 


White  Fir 

and 

Ponderosa  Pine 


Adin,  California 


(Copyright,   1931,  2-0  Publishing  Co.) 
Founded    1922 

Business  Office:  465  Tenth  Street 

San  Francisco  3,  California 

Phone  MArket  1-7110 

An  Independent  Journal  Published  Monthly,  Devoted  to 
the  Interests  of 

ALL  CALIFORNIA  AND  NEVADA  LAW 
ENFORCEMENT  AGENCIES 

Published  Monthly  by 

Police  and  Peace  Officers'  Journal 

our  foreign  exchanges 

THE  GARDA  REVIEW     ....     2  Crow  St.,  Dublin,  Ireland 

ALERTA,  A.  V.  JUAREZ Desp.  6,  Mexico,  D.  F. 

REVISTA  DE  POLICIA 

Rioja,  666,  Buenos  Aires,  Republic  of  Argentine,  S.  A. 

CONSTABULARY  GAZETTE Belfast,   Ireland 

POLICE  NEWS New  South  Wales 

POLICE  JOURMAL Wellington,  New  Zealand 

WALTER  R.  HECOX Editor 

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excursions  available. 

PORTS  OF  CALL: 

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for  full  details  or  write 

AMERICAN  PRESIDENT  LINES 


9 


General  Office 

311  California  Street 

152  Geary  Street 

San  Francisco  4,  California 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  1 


Featured  in  This  Issue 


Meet  the  New  Champ 


Attention  All  Police  Officers 


The  Killei's  Cap 4 


Women  Peace  Officers 


I'm  Readw  Coach 


Associated   Public  Communications  Officers 


Foothill  Police  Chief 


Winter  Driving  Rules 11 


Police  Promotion  Examination  Questions 


12 


Sacramento  Scramble 13 


Pistol  Pointing 14 


.Midnight  Manhunt 15 


Personal  Identification  in  Earlv  America     ...      16 


Ma\or  Robinson's  Christmas  Message 


51 


Chief  Gaffev  Lauded 52 


Excerpts  from  San  Francisco  Police  Ordinances     .      53 


The  Editor  is  always  pleased  to  consider  articles  suitable  for  publication.  Con- 
tributions should  preferably  be  typewritten,  but  where  this  is  not  possible,  copy 
should  be  clearly  WTitten.  Contributions  may  be  signed  with  a  "nora  de  plume," 
but  all  articles  must  bear  the  name  and  address  of  the  sender,  which  will  be 
treated  with  the  strictest  confidence.  The  Editor  will  also  be  pleased  to  consider 
photographs  of  officers  and  of  interesting  events.  Letters  should  be  addressed  to 
the  Editor. 


Directory 


SAN  FRANCISCO  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

Hall  of  Justice,  Kearny  and  'Washington  Streets 

Telephone  SUtter  1-2020 

Radio  Short  Wave  Call  KMA-438 


Mayor,  Hon.  Elmer  E.  Robinson 


POLICE  COMMISSIONERS 

Regular  Meetings,  Wednesday,  2:00  p.m.,  Hall  of  Justfcc 

Washington  I.  Kohnke,  President 686  Sacramento  Street 

Henrv  C.  Macinn 315  Montgomery  Street 

J.  Warnock  Walsh 160  Montgomery  Street 

Sergeant  John  T.  Butler,  Secretary 
Room  104,  Hall  of  Justice 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE Michael  Gaffey 

DEPUTY  CHIEF  OF  POLICE Bernard  J.  McDonald 

Chief  of  Inspectors Jamu  Eholuh 

Director  of  Traffic _ Jack  Eker 

Dept.  Sec't.  .Captain  Michael  F.  FiTZPATRicr....H«ll  of  Juitice 

District  Captains 

Central Daniel  McKlem 635  Washington  Street 

Southern Walter  Ames Fourth  and  Clara  Streets 

Mission Edward  Donohue 1240   Valencia   Street 

Northern Peter   Conroy 941   Ellis   Street 

Richmond Aloysius  O'Brien .451  Sixth  ,\venue 

Ingleside Leo  Tackney Balboa  Park 

Taraval August  G.   Steffen 2348  Twenty-fourth  Avenue 

Potrero Ted  Terlau 2300  Third  Street 

Golden  Gate  Park William  Danahy Stanyan  opp.  Waller 

Traffic Ralph  E.  Olstad Hall  of  Justice 

City  Prison Lr.  Walter  Thompson Hall  of  Justice 

Civilian  Defense IiEorge  Healy Hall  of  Justice 

Bur.  Inspectors Cornelius  Murphy Hall  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Personnel John  A.  Engler Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of 

Criminology Francis  X.  Latulipi H»ll  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Special  Services Otto  Meyer Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of  Juvenile  Bureau 2475  Greenwich  Street 

John  Meehan 

Director  -  Bureau  of  Criminal 

Information Lieut.  George  Hippely Hall  of  Justice 

Insp.  of  Schools 

Traffic  Control Insp.  Thomas  B.  Tract 

Supervising  Captain 

of  Districts Jeremiah  J.  Coughlin Hall  of  Justice 

Chinatown  Detaii Lt.  H.  C.  Atkinson     Hall  of  Justice 

Range  Master Pistol  Range,  Lalce  Merced 

Emil  Dutil 


When  In  Trouble     Qull  SUttCT  hlO^lO 

When    In  Doubt  Always  At  Your  Service 


Page  2 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'   JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


To  All  California  Peace  Officers 

We  Hope  The  Old  Year 

Was  A  Good  One 

"And  That  The  New  One 

Will  Be  Even  Better 


The  Lumber  Industry  of  Northern  California 


THE  DORRIS  LUMBER 
AND  MOULDING  CO. 


p.  O.  BOX  2688 
SACRAMENTO      10 
CALIFORNIA 


LUMBER  JACK  SAYS 

BUILD  IT  AND 
BUDGET  IT  THE 
STEINER  WAY ! 


Three  Big  Yards  to  Serve  You 

SACRAMENTO  •  CARMICHAEL 
OROVILLE 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Pa{/e  3 


"Efficient  Police 

Make  a  Land  of 

Peace" 


(Established  1922) 


The  Magazine 

Peace  Officers 

Read 


(Trade  Mark  Copyright) 


Vol.  XXVI 


DECEMBER,  1952   •   JANUARY,   1953 


No.  4 


MEET  THE  NEW  CHAMP 


At  11:59  P.M.  on  December  31,  1952 
we  said  goodbye  to  a  bearded  and  bedrag- 
gled old  man.  It's  surprising  what  one 
year  can  do  to  some  people.  AVhen  we 
first  met  this  fellow  he  was  a  pudgy  tot 
in  the  pink  of  condition  whose  entire 
wardrobe  consisted  of  a  high  silk  top  hat 
and  a  red  ribbon.  We  remember  him 
clearly.  He  waved  a  bottle  of  champagne 
at  us  and  ^nirgled  joyfully.  Next  he  was 
bent,  wrinkled  and  had  to  keep  his  eyes 
on  the  floor  so  he  would  not  stumble  over 
his  beard.  The  little  fellow  led  a  fast 
life.  Not  that  you  could  blame  him.  He 
had  a  lot  to  do,  what  with  elections,  the 
hydrogen  bomb  and  the  war  in  Korea,  to 
say  nothing  of  the  myriad  of  lesser  prob- 
lems. Things  like  that  will  age  anyone 
in  a  hurry. 

We  were  a  little  sorry  for  the  old  boy 
so  we  raised  a  glass  of  champagne  to  our 
lips  and  drank  a  toast  to  Old  Man  1952. 
It  was  good  French  champagne  which  we 
could  not  afford  but  someone  else  had 
bought  it  and  it  tasted  better  that  wa\-. 
In  fact  it  tasted  so  good  that  when  the 
old  fellow  waved  a  sad  farewell  and 
wandered  out  the  door  we  were  already 
on  our  second  glasas  and  shouting, 
"Happy  New  Year".  It  was  just  about 
then  that  this  unclothed  cherub  walked 
in  the  portal. 

He  was  such  a  healthy  looking  kid 
you  could  have  taken  him  for  the  twin 
brother  of  the  youngster  who  made  his 
debut  on  earth  at  precisely  the  same  hour 
last  year.  But  there  was  a  difference.  Of 
course,  it  may  have  been  imagination,  but 
he  looked  sturdier  and  more  full  of  hope 
somehow.  It  may  have  been  wishfid 
thinking.  We  can't  honestly  say  we  were 
sorry  to  see  the  old  man  go.  He  tried 
hard,  but  he  could  have  done  better  to 
our  way  of  thinking.   But  THIS  kid  was 


ATTENTION  ALL  OFFICERS 

The  publishers  of  the  Police 
AND  Pe.ace  Officers'  Jourxal 
know  you  are  all  doing  a  fine  job. 
And  we  know  that  hardly  any 
amount  of  money  is  enough  money 
in  these  days  of  rapidly  spiraling 
costs  of  living.  So  we  have  decided 
to  help  out.  Not  much.  Just  a 
little. 

Begiiuiing  in  February  the  Po- 
lice AXD  Peace  Officers'  Jour- 
nal will  present  a  $50  defense 
bond  to  the  officer  whom  we  be- 
lieve has  turned  in  the  best  bit  of 
police  work  in  California  during 
the  past  month.  You  do  not  have 
to  catch  another  Jack  Dillinger  to 
win  this  award.  (Of  course,  that 
would  help.)  We  will  consider  all 
types  of  police  work  so  that  a  traf- 
fic or  juvenile  officer  will  have  an 
even  chance  with  the  fellows  in  the 
homicide  detail. 

Naturally  we  are  going  to  need 
a  little  help.  We  read  more  news- 
papers than  the  average  man  but 
there  are_still  bound  to  be  things 
we  miss.  A  lot  of  times  the  little 
things  are  the  big  things  in  police 
work  but  no  one  hears  about  them. 
We  want  to  hear  about  them  and 
we  can  only  through  you.  So  .  .  . 
starting  now,  if  you  can  think  of  a 
brother  officer  who  deserves  consid- 
eration for  this  award,  please  write 
us  and  tell  us  about  his  exploits. 
The  address  is  The  Police  and 
Peace  Officers'  Journal,  465 
Tenth  Street,  San  Francisco. 
Any  regularly  employed  police  or 
peace  officer  in  California  is  eli- 
gible. 


different.  He  looked  like  he  might  realh 
have  the  stuff.  Yessir,  sitting  there 
.•unong  the  riotous,  singing  guests,  we  de- 
cided that  1953  may  be  THE  year.  The 
little  fellow  really  seemed  to  ha\e  wliat 
it  takes. 

We  hope  that  1952  was  a  little — quite 
:i  little — nicer  to  you  fellows  than  it  was 
to  us.  \  ou  won't  find  any  of  us  gloating 
over  what  a  fine  1952  it  was.  The  Po- 
lice and  Peace  Officers'  Journal 
may  have  seen  tougher  years,  but  they 
will  be  hard  to  find.  The  year  opened 
with  Opie  Warner  in  pretty  bad  condi- 
tion. Then,  in  April,  he  died.  A  part  of 
the  Journal  died  with  him.  A  part  which 
we  won't  even  try  to  get  back.  He  was 
the  Journal  for  so  many  years  that  it 
would  be  impossible  to  try  to  fill  his 
shoes.  All  we  can  do  is  carry  on  and  try 
to  do  our  job  in  the  way  we  know  he 
woidd  have  wanted  us  to  .  .  .  and  hope 
that  he  found  peace,  contentment  and 
maybe  a  good  group  of  peace  officers  in 
the  land  beyond  the  curtain. 

Next  Frank  Fisher  took  over  the  reins 
as  editor.  Poor  Frank  moved  to  a  sick 
bed  almost  as  soon  as  he  accepted  the  job. 
He  is  staging  a  valiant  fight  and  winning 
a  little  now.  Every  day  they  tell  us  he  is 
gaining  groiuid.  Everyone  we  know  is 
pulling  for  him.  We  hope  he  will  be  back 
in  here  pitching,  soon. 

About  the  first  of  September  the  pres- 
ent editor  came  along.  A  young  fellow 
who  should  be  around  for  quite  a  while. 
{We  certainly  hope  so  inasmuch  as  he  is 
writing  this  piece.)  He  managed  to  stay 
healthy  for  the  rest  of  the  year  so  things 
went  a  little  more  smoothly.  But  it  was 
a  tough  year,  believe  us.  AVe  don't  want 
another  like  it  for  a  while. 

As  we  say,  we  hope  it  was  a  better 
year  for  most  of  you.  We  know,  that  for 
(Continued  on  page  60) 


Page  4 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   195 i 


THE  KILLER'S  CAP 


Bv  Walti'R  R.  Hecox 


Even  in  San  Francisco,  where  the 
temperature  only  varies  about  twenty  de- 
grees between  January  and  July,  it  is  a 
little  on  the  chilly  side  in  February.  It 
was  cold  on  the  night  of  the  sixteenth 
with  the  damp,  dripping  mist  drifting  in 
from  the  water  and  sending  a  brisk  sea 
breeze  in  ahead  of  it  as  an  advance 
guard.  On  Forty-eighth  Avenue,  so  close 
to  the  Pacific  that  one  could  hear  the 
surf  pounding  only  a  few  hundred  yards 
away,  the  street  lights  glowed  dimly 
through  the  gloom,  each  one  surrounded 
by  its  own  moist  rainbow. 

It  was  eight  o'clock  and  already  the 
shades  had  been  pulled  in  most  houses 
along  the  block  as  the  people  who  lived 
on  the  fringe  of  the  city  blocked  out 
the  elements  and  barricaded  themselves 
within  the  warmth  of  their  homes.  Only 
in  the  little  store  at  1515  Forty-eighth 
Avenue  was  there  a  light,  one  bright 
bulb  gleaming  bravely,  sendings  its  feeble 
beams  unprotected  into  the  peculiar  San 
Francisco  dew. 

Within  the  store  Mrs.  Albina  Chabot 
Voorhies  prepared  to  close.  She  was  a 
small  woman,  sixty-five  years  old,  quiet, 
friendly  and  proud  of  her  independence. 
And  although  she  had  locked  the  front 
door  and  was  winding  things  up  for  the 
night,  everyone  in  that  section  of  the 
Richmond  district  knew  that  the  store 
never  really  closed. 

Mrs.  Voorhies  was  a  friendly  woman, 
anxious  to  please  any  of  her  neighbors 
whom  she  knew  or  trusted.  A  little  on 
the  timid  side  after  dark.  Prudently 
timid.  She  realized  that  she  was  too  old 
to  defend  herself  and  vulnerable  to  at- 
tack. Promptly  at  eight  o'clock  each  ni:^ht 
she  locked  the  door  to  the  little  store  and 
refused  to  let  anyone  she  did  not  recog- 
nize in.  This  system  was  no  burden  to 
her  neighbors.  There  was  no  one  in  the 
area  she  did  not  know  and  like.  Some- 
times, it  seemed,  the  door  opened  a> 
much  after  the  official  closing  hour  as 
before.  But  the  locked  door  did  start 
rumors. 

Harmless  rumors,  it  seemed.  It  is  hard 
to  say  where  they  originated.  The  best 
guess  was  the  children  in  the  area. 
Youngsters,  sent  by  their  mothers  to  the 
store  for  the  missing  package  of  sugar 
or  a  cube  of  butter,  darted  through  the 
gloom  toward  that  single,  gleaming  bulb 
and  waited  breathlessly  outside  while  the 
little  old  lady  came  from  her  tiny  apart- 


ment in  the  rear  to  open  the  door.  There 
was  an  arrangement  which  rang  a  bell 
in  the  apartment.  All  of  the  kids  knew 
that.  They  heard  it  ring  frequently  when 
they  came  to  the  store  during  daylight 
hours.  If  it  worked  then  it  would  work 
at  night,  so  why  close  the  door?  That 
was  their  reasoning.  The  answer  was 
simple.  There  is  a  reason  for  everything. 
Mrs.  Voorhies'  reason  for  locking  the 
door  was  that  she  had  "heaps  of  money" 
hidden  on  the  premises.  The  rumor 
spread.  Soon  everyone  in  the  neighbor- 
hood was  sure  that  the  elderly  woman 
had  a  hoard  of  cash  hidden  on  her  prem- 
ises. An  innocent  enough  tale  on  the  sur- 
face. But  a  dangerous  one  for  Mrs. 
Voorhies.  There  is  always  someone  will- 
ing to  believe  such  a  story  who  dreams 
of  getting  his  hands  on  the  money.  May- 
be a  professional  yegg.  Or,  as  often  as 
not,  an  amateur.  A  juvenile  with 
twisted  ideas. 


Inspector  Louis  De  Mattei 

It  was  a  young  man  who  stood  in  the 
fog  outside  the  little  store  on  the  night 
of  February  sixteenth  and  watched  the 
woman  rearranging  her  shelves  as  she 
prepared  to  retire  to  her  apartment.  A 
well  dressed  yoimg  man,  who  had  shield- 
ed himself  from  the  chill  air  with  a  grey 
overcoat  and  a  matching  golf  cap. 


He  was  not  an  impressive  looking 
figure.  His  face  was  flat,  with  high 
cheek  bones  and  narrow,  tapering  eyes 
that  drooped  a  little  at  the  corners.  It 
was  hard  to  tell  if  they  were  grey  or 
brown.  His  lips  were  thin,  with  a  slight 
cruel  twist  at  the  corners.  Straight 
brown,  dull  hair  was  brushed  straight 
back  from  a  low  forehead.  He  watched 
the  woman,  strangely  fascinated,  shiver- 
ing a  little  perhaps  from  the  cold  .  .  . 
or  perhaps  because  of  his  plan. 

Before  long   he  drew  a  deep  breath, 
stepped  forward  and  tapped  on  the  glass 
door.  The  woman  peered  into  the  dark-  ■ 
ness,  waited  until  she  was  sure  she  rec-  ' 
ognized  him,  then  turned  the  key  in  the 
lock. 

"What  are  you  doing  here  so  late, 
Charlie?"  she  inquired. 

The  youth  grinned  amiably.  "Nothing 
wrong  with  a  man  coming  to  look  at  his 
own  store,  is  there?" 

The  woman  laughed  gaily  and  swung 
the  door  wide  open.  "Come  in,  Charlie. 
But  don't  tell  me  you're  a  man.  Why, 
you're  still  just  a  little  boy  to  me.  And 
it  will  be  a  long  time  before  you  own 
a  store  like  this." 

The  youth's  laugh  echoed  hers.  "I 
guess  you're  right,  Mrs.  Voorhies.  Any- 
way, I'm  a  little  boy  tonight.  I  just 
happened  to  be  passing  by  and  noticed 
you  were  open.  Somehow  my  sweet  tooth 
hit  me.  I  want  some  cookies.  Chocolate 
eclairs  if  you  have  any." 

"Of  course  I  have  some,  Charlie,"  the 
woman  replied.  "When  will  the  day 
come  when  I  don't.  Wait  a  minute  and 
I'll  get  you  some.  But  they  are  expensive, 
you  know." 

"I  can  pay  for  them,"  he  assured  her. 

"Of  course  you  can,  Charlie."  Mrs. 
Voorhies  paused  and  stared  at  the  late- 
comer curiously.  "AVhat  in  the  world  is 
making  you  shake  like  that?  ^Vhy,  your 
teeth  are  almost  chattering." 

"It's  cold  outside  tonight,"  the  youth 
answered.  "I  wouldn't  be  surprised  at 
all  if  my  teeth  did  chatter  before  I  get 
home.  It's  a  long  way  from  here." 

"It  certainly  is,"  the  woman  agreed. 

The  young  man  looked  seriously  when 
the  woman  paused.  His  eyes  narrowed 
slightly. 

"I  still  want  the  eclairs,"  he  reminded 
her. 

"Of  course,"  she  replied.  "I'll  get 
them  for  you  right  now." 

(Continued  on  page  18) 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


P<ige  5 


MURDER  STORV — These  pictures  are,  of  course,  very  old  and  not  as  good  as  they  could  he.  They  were  copied  from  photographs,  now 
yellowed  with  age,  which  were  contained  in  Louis  DeMattei's  scrap  book.  They  do  illustrate  graphically  the  gruesome  crime  which  Louis, 
with  the  slenderest  clue  possible,  solved.  The  picture  to  the  left  shows  the  V'oorhies  living  room.  The  place  where  the  floor  is  ripped  through 
is  the  place  where  Alvina  Voorhies'  body  first  rested  when  the  fire  started.  The  picture  to  the  right  shows  the  bathroom  where  the  elderly 
woman  was  dragged,  flaming,  to  die. 


Editor's  note: 

On  February  1,  1953,  Louis  DeMat- 
tei  will  retire  from  the  San  Francisco 
Police  Department.  He  will  move  to  his 
home  in  the  rolling  hills  of  Sonoma 
county  and  enjoy  the  sunlight,  the  coun- 
tryside and  a  tranquil  life.  He  will  be, 
for  the  first  time  in  three  and  a  half 
decades,  a  private  citizen.  But  he  will 
not  be  forgotten  in  San  Francisco.  Not 
by  the  department  nor  by  the  legion  of 
persons  in  San  Francisco  who  knew  or 
knew  of  him. 

Louis  DeMattei's  adventures  as  a  San 
Francisco  policeman  have  been  varied 
and  exciting  enough  to  satisfy  any  motion 
picture  producer.  No  movie  ever  dared 
to  show  an  episode  as  bloodcurdling  as 
the  rampage  of  Mad  Dog  Kelly  or  as 
exciting  as  the  chase  for  the  killer  which 
culminated  in  his  capture.  The  fanatical 
bombings  of  St.  Peter  and  Paul's  Church 
form  another  chapter  in  Louis'  past. 
There  are  other  stories.  Scores  of  them. 
In  fact  there  are  so  many  that  the  Po- 
lice .'\ND  Peace  Officer's  Jourx.al 
is  going  to  do  a  series  of  them.  From 
the  looks  of  things  the  series  ought  to 
last  for  years. 

We  are  not  going  to  start  with  the  be- 
ginning of  Louis'  career  and  go  through 
it  chronologically.  Instead,  for  the  first 


installment,  we  have  chosen  a  case  which 
is,  if  not  the  most  exciting,  is  by  far  the 
most  interesting.  It  hinged  on  a  clue  so 
slim  that  the  average  detective  story 
reader  would  not  believe  the  yarn.  Too 
incredible.  But  those  of  you  who  remem- 
ber the  case  will  know  it  is  true.  You 
will  not  forget  the  grey  golf  cap  very 
soon. 

The  case  was  not  Louis'.  He  was  never 
asigned  to  it.  Rut  he  solved  it.  At  the 
time  Chief  Anthony  J.  Quinn  gave  him 
full  credit  for  the  capture.  And  the  way 
Louis  did  it  will  surprise  you  all. 


Pedestrian   Responsibilties 

Each  year  thousands  of  pedestrians 
are  killed  while  walking  along  our  city 
streets  or  country  highways.  While  the 
major  part  of  the  responsibility  for  the 
reduction  of  this  tragic  toll  rests  with 
the  drivers  of  automobiles,  trucks,  and 
busses,  a  considerable  part  of  this  re- 
sponsibility must  be  assumed  by  the  pe- 
destrian himself. 

And  yet,  points  out  the  Public  Safety 
Department  of  the  National  Automobile 
Club,  there  are  always  these  pedestrians 
who  persist  in  leaving  it  all  up  to  the 
motorist.  Walking  down  city  sidewalks 
they  will  suddenly  wheel  and  dart  out 


between  parked  cars  right  into  the  line 
of  traffic,  paying  no  attention  whatsoever 
to  the  cars  that  might  be  bearing  down 
upon  them.  Prepossessed  with  their  own 
thoughts  they  will  step  off  curbs  without 
looking  this  way  or  that,  will  walk 
against  the  lights  more  often  than  not. 
Or  strolling  down  country  roads,  they 
will  walk  far  out  on  the  pavement  with 
their  backs  turned  to  the  fast  moving 
stream  of  traffic,  always  assuming  that 
the  motorist  will  see  them  and  will  man- 
age to  avoid  an  accident. 

The  wise  pedestrian  doesn't  walk  so. 
When  walking  near  or  through  traffic 
he  crosses  only  at  intersections,  he  always 
crosses  with  the  lights,  and  never  makes 
the  mistake  of  crossing  on  the  diagonal. 
Before  he  steps  off  any  curb  he  takes  a 
good  look  up  and  down  the  street  to  see 
what  cars  may  be  coming  and  to  make 
sure  that  the  drivers  see  him  and  what 
he  is  about  to  do.  When  walking  along 
the  highway  he  always  walks  well  off 
the  pavement  and  on  the  left  side  facing 
into  oncoming  traffic.  And  when  walking 
at  night,  he  wears  or  carries  something 
white  and  moves  with  extra  caution. 

^Valking  near  traffic  is  always  a  heads- 
up  game  and  the  pedestrian  who  treats 
it  as  such  is  the  pedestrian  who  manages 
to  stav  alive. 


Page  6 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


WOMEN  PEACE  OFFICER'S 


The  Women  Peace  Officers  Associa- 
tion of  California  met  December  3rd  at 
Eaton's  Restaurant  in  Arcadia,  home 
of  Florence  Wilson,  President  of  the 
Association. 


President  Florence  Wilson 

The  tables  were  decorated  in  the 
Christmas  Motif  of  Red  Candles  and 
Red  Berries  and  Lipsticks  were  placed  at 
each  place  setting  as  favors.  Hand  deco- 
rated place  cards  were  used  for  all  spe- 
cial guests. 

Officials  Present 

All  of  the  City  Officials  of  the  City 
of  Arcadia  turned  out  to  honor  the  asso- 
ciation president,  Florence  AVilson.  The 
meeting  was  opened  with  a  salute  to  the 
Hag  led  by  David  T.  Sweet.  Police- 
woman Lucille  Stroh  of  the  Conipton 
Police  Department  gave  the  Invocation. 
A  fried  chicken  dinner  with  the  trim- 
mings was  served  followed  by  the  intro- 
duction of  guests  by  President  Florence 
Wilson.  The  official  welcome  was  given 
by  Mayor  Suachin  of  Arcadia,  who 
stated  he  was  honored  and  happy  to 
welcome  the  \Vomen  Peace  Officers  of 
California  to  Arcadia,  and  stated  he 
hoped  he  could  do  so  more  often. 

Entertainment 
Policewoman  Daisy  Storms  of  Los 
Angeles  was  program  chairman  and  in- 
troduced Charlie  Picard  of  the  Grand 
Old  Opera,  who  entertained  the  group 
with  humorous  stories  and  sang  "Chatta- 
nooga Shoe  Shine  Boy,"  and  "You  Are 
My  Sunshine." 


Policewoman  Daisy  Storms  also  intro- 
duced Cal  Stewart,  Superintendent  of 
the  Intake  of  the  Los  Angeles  County 
Probation  Department,  which  is  the 
largest  Probation  Department  in  the 
world.  Stewart  stated  that  he  hoped  to 
bring  better  relations  between  the  pub- 
lic, and  peace  officers,  probation  depart- 
ments and  all  other  agencies  which  deal 
with  crime.  He  also  stated  there  could 
be  no  price  set  on  how  much  a  good 
peace  officer  is  worth,  referring  to  both 
rnen  and  women  officers,  that  it  was  un- 
limited, but  worth  much  more  than  they 
are  now  paid. 

Prize  Offered 

He  spoke  of  the  close  relationship 
between  the  Probation  Department  and 
the  peace  officers  and  said  he  had  been 
termed  by  some  people  as  a  glorified 
policeman.  He  said  he  was  dissatified 
with  the  title  of  peace  officer,  which 
rarely  is  understood  by  the  public  and 
offered  as  a  challenge  for  the  best 
thought  to  promote  better  public  rela- 
tions a  book  over  a  hundred  years  old, 
dated  1831  with  five  dollars  hidden 
among  its  pages.  Two  one  dollar  pages 
and  a  three  dollar  page  will  be  found 
m  the  book.  Each  page  contains  import- 
ant quotations  for  peace  officers  and 
probation    officers.     Stewart    closed    his 


Margaret  Boyd 
speech  by  saying,  "It  is  the  Peace  Offi- 
cers who  are  the  soldiers  who  stand  on 
the  battleground  between  the  citizen 
and  the  criminal  and  danger."  He  added 
that  the  Peace  Officer  who  so  often 
IS  termed  "Cop"  needs  the  support  and 
helping  hand  of  the  public. 


Miss  Boyd  Speaks 

Policewoman  Margaret  Boyd  of  the 
Los  Angeles  Police  Department  was 
then  introduced  and  repeated  her  speech 
which  she  gave  to  the  International 
Convention  of  Chiefs  of  Police,  with  a 
few  minor  changes  to  fit  the  persons 
present. 

The  Women  Peace  Officers  Associa- 
tion selects  a  women  of  outstanding 
achievement  in  law  enforcement,  who 
has  served  her  community  well  and 
presents  her  with  an  Honorary  Life 
Membership  in  the  Women's  Peace 
Officers  Association  of  California.  At 
this  time,  Judge  Lille  of  the  Superior 
Court  was  presented  with  a  membership 
and  a  pin  patterned  after  a  Peace  Wo- 
man's Badge. 

The  meeting  was  closed  with  scores 
of  good  holiday  wishes,  and  door  prizes 
made  of  plastic  by  the  husband  of  the 
President  of  the  Women's  Peace  Offi- 
cers Association. 


THREE  BILLION  GALLONS 

Gross  revenues  derived  from  the  4J^ 
cent  state  tax  on  September  distributions 
of  approximately  345,000,000  gallons  of 
gasoline  and  other  high  test  motor  fuel 
amounted  to  $15,558,044,  according  to 
George  R.  Reilly,  First  District  Mem- 
ber of  the  State  Board  of  Equalization. 
Tax  refunds  by  Controller  Thomas 
H.  Kuchel  during  the  month  to  purchas- 
ers of  fuel  for  nonhighway  use  totaled 
$1,530,768,  or  9.8  per  cent  of  the  gross 
tax  liabilities  accruing  during  the  month, 
leaving  net  revenues  of  $14,027,276. 
These  net  revenues  were  7.0  per  cent 
above  those  of  a  year  ago. 

During  the  first  nine  months  of  1952 
almost  three  billion  gallons  of  taxable 
motor  vehicle  fuel  were  distributed,  an 
increase  of  214,900,000  gallons  or  7.7 
per  cent  over  the  distributions  during  the 
corresponding  period  of  last  year. 

Diesel  fuel  used  on  the  highways  dur- 
ing September  was  reported  at  14,436,- 
132  gallons,  virtually  the  same  as  the  pre- 
vious month's  usage  but  17.3  per  cent 
above  the  figure  for  the  corresponding 
month  of  1951.  The  users  of  this  fuel 
were  taxed  under  a  law  that  applies  only 
to  low-test  motor  fuels  used  on  Califor- 
nia streets  and  highways.  In  addition, 
deficiency  assessments  were  made  on 
857,705  gallons  of  previously  unreported 
fuel  used  prior  to  September.  The  com- 
bined tax,  penalty,  and  interest  amounted 
to  $697,937  as  compared  with  $587,629 
a  year  ago  and  $691,079  a  month  ago. 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  7 


I'M  READY,  COACH 


It's  an  old  gag.  One  that  might  be 
heard  in  the  armed  services  more  than 
any  place  else.  But  it  could  be  heard  in 
a  business  office  or  on  a  construction  job 
or  maybe  in  a  fire  station.  Anyplace 
where  a  man  can  approach  his  superior 
and  tell  him  he  is  ready  to  do  a  specific 
job. 

"V  ready,  coach.    Put  me  in." 


energies  toward  organized  recreation. 
By  the  time  he  decided  to  run  for  the 
office  of  sheriff  he  was  recreation  director 
of  the  City  of  Stockton. 

Like  the  man  who  sat  down  at  the 
piano,  some  people  laughed  when  Carlos 
Sousa  announced  that  he  was  going  to 
run  for  sheriff.  His  opposition  came  from 
four  other  men  and  the  incumbent.     1  he 


spected  him  for  it.  Anyway  in  November 
of  1946  he  was  elected  Sheriff-Coroner 
of  San  Joaquin  County.  And  on  Janu- 
ary 1,  1947,  his  work  started.  The  spirit 
of  fair  play  which  Sousa  had  taught  on 
the  recreation  fields  of  Stockton  had  paid 
off. 

There  was  a  lot  of  work  to  lio.    The 
old  San  Joaquin  Sheriff's  office  was  effi- 


SHERIFF  CARLOS  A.  SOUSA  AND  HIS  SQUAD   OF  SAN  JOAQUIN  COUNTY  SHERIFF'S  RESERVES. 


Sure,  you've  all  heard  it.  A  friendly 
sort  of  kidding.  But  when  Undersheriff 
Michael  Canlis  addresses  the  phrase  to 
Sheriff  Carlos  A.  Sousa  of  the  San  Joa- 
quin County  Sheriff's  office,  he  is  kidding 
on  the  square.  Back  in  the  not  so  distant 
limbo  when  the  sheriff's  vocation  was 
recreation  and  Michael  was  a  high  school 
boy,  the  situation  existed. 

Michael's  football  coach  was  none 
other  than  Carlos  A.  Sousa. 

A  lot  of  water  has  passed  under  the 
bridge  since  Coach  Sousa  showed  young 
Canlis  the  difference  between  the  Notre 
Dame  box  and  the  single  wing.  LTntil 
the  spring  of  1946  Sousa  directed  all  his 


race  took  on  a  somber  touch  during  that 
summer  when  the  incumbent  died.  There 
may  have  been  those  in  the  contest  whose 
conscience  was  troubled  a  little  when  the 
officer  passed  away.  Sousa's  conscience 
was  clear.  He  had  kept  his  campaign 
clean.  Before  announcing  his  intention 
he  had  visited  the  incumbent  in  his  office 
and  informed  him  of  his  intentions. 

"I  want  to  win,"  he  announced.  "But 
I  want  a  clean  fight.  ^  ou  will  not  get 
any  name  calling  or  mud  slinging  from 
me.  There  is  no  need  to  roll  politics  in 
the  gutter." 

Sousa  kept  his  word,  and  apparently 
the   people  of   San   Joaquin  County  re- 


cient,  but  needed  a  thorough  going  over. 
Modernization  w-as  one  need.  Improved 
working  conditions  for  the  sheriff's  depu- 
ties and  office  staff  were  also  needed.  Ex- 
Coach  Sousa  pitched  into  his  new  job 
with  vigor. 

His  first  move  was  to  place  his  entire 
personnel  under  civil  service  and  give 
them  a  shorter  work  week.  Slowly  but 
surely  the  wages  of  his  men  climbed 
while  their  working  hours  shrunk.  To- 
day a  San  Joaquin  Deputy  works  a  forty- 
hour  week.  Instituting  the  short  week 
forced  Sheriff  Sousa  to  hire  21  additional 
deputies  this  year,  but  it  also  provided 
(Continued  on  page  28) 


Pnge  8 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


ASSOCIATED  PUBLIC  COMMUNICATIONS  OFFICERS 

Director  George  Hippely,  President  Art  McDole,  Secretary 


The  regular  monthly  meeting  of  the 
Associated  Public  Communications  Offi- 
cers, Inc.  was  held  at  Vahl's  in  Alviso, 
Calif,  on  December  11,  1952.  Robert 
Mason  of  Santa  Clara  County  was  host. 

The  meeting  was  called  to  order  at 
11:15  a.m.  by  Vice  President  Jack  At- 
kinson, in  the  absence  of  President  Hip- 
pely. Thirty-eight  members  and  guests 
were  in  attendance. 

A  letter  from  Mariposa  County  re- 
questing clearance  on  154.89  mc  for 
mobile  use  was  read.  A  request  from 
Sacramento  County  requesting  the  use 
of  45.34  mc  for  a  base  station  at  the 
Prison  Farm  was  presented  by  McMur- 
phy  and  discussed.  A  letter  from  \'uba 
City  requesting  the  use  of  I55.13mc  for 
a  base  standby  frequency  was  read  and 
discussed.  It  was  suggested  by  LeBouef 
that  they  be  required  to  monitor  this  fre- 
quency to  avoid  interference  with  other 
stations  in  the  Tri-County  Net. 

All  requests  were  approved  by  Capt. 
McMurphy  Chairman  of  the  Frequency 
Committee  with  the  above  mentioned 
stipulations.  Granted  on  motion  by  Kel- 
ler, seconded  by  LeBoueff. 

J.  Mansfield  Lewis  of  Marin  County 
reported  satisfactory  progress  on  the 
Procedure  and  Operating  Committee. 

McMurphy  reported  the  Point  to 
Point  to  Point  System  working  good. 

The  secretary  read  a  letter  from  the 
Chief  of  Police,  Chico  and  called  the 
members  attention  to  several  recent  re- 
visions in  Part  10  Rules  and  Regula- 
tion-^. 

^Valter  Keller  commented  on  a  re- 
cent ham  radio  contact  with  President 
Fox  of  CPRA.  Seems  the  bovs  down 
south  are  going  to  change  the  nam"  of 
th"ir  Chanter  to  conform  with  the  acf'on 
tal'cn  at  San  Francisco. 

The  secretary  reported  he  had  bf-i 
asked  to  serve  on  a  committee  for  re- 
vision of  the  Nation  APCO  Constitu- 
tion and  By-Laws  and  asked  for  ideas 
and  help. 

Frank  Roach  from  the  Sfate  Office  of 
C'vil  Defense  discussed  RACES.  He 
asked  the  members  to  get  their  commun- 
ications plans  in  as  soon  as  possible. 

F.  V.  Sloan,  Engineer  in  Charge  FCC 
San  Francisco  entered  into  the  discus- 
sion and  clarified  some  points. 

The  Bell  and  Light  system  was  dis- 
cussed by  McMurphy.  He  stated  the 
basic  idea  was  okey,  but  some  trouble  had 
been  experience  with  false  alarms.  Carl 
Holmes,  FT  and  T  representative  of 
OCD  told  of  changes  that  were  being 
made  to  prevent  future  false  alarms. 


1  he  meeting  was  adjourned  for  lunch 
at  12:30  p.m. 

The  meeting  was  reconvened  at  1  :25 
p.m. 

Robert  IMason  introduced  several 
guests  including  a  delegation  from  San 
Joaquin  County  who  were  there  to  study 
problems  in  fire  communications. 

Nominations  for  officers  were  then 
adopted.  The  following  were  nominated  : 
President,  John  Atkinson ;  Vice  Presi- 
dent, Art  McDole ;  Secretary,  Tom 
Bayley ;  Member  of  Board,  J.  M.  Lewis. 

Nominations  were  closed  until  the 
January  meeting,  at  which  time  they 
will  be  reopened  and  elections  will  be 
held. 

The  secretary  then  read  a  proposed 
amendment  to  our  Constitution  and  By- 
Laws.  This  amendment  is  for  the  pur- 
pose of  clarifying  types  of  membership. 
It  will  be  given  the  second  reading  in 
Tanaarv  and  voted  upon  at  that  time. 

Bob  Miller  of  Pacific  Gas  &  Electric 
commented  on  proposed  amendments  by 
Federal  Communications  Commission 
Dockets  affecting  the  72-76mc.  bands. 
Television  apparenth'  is  still  attempting 
to  chop  away  at  Public  Safety  Services. 
The  feeling  was  held  by  the  members 
that  National  should  take  notice  of  this 
Docket  and  strongly  protest  same. 

Commercial  members  reporting  were 
Crabtree,  Deetkins,  Riley,  Robbie  and 
Griese. 

John  Hartnett  offered  Burlingame  for 
the   January    meeting.   Accepted. 

There  being  no  further  business,  the 
meeting  was  adjourned   at  2:10   p.m. 

November  Meeting 

The  refjular  November  meeting  of  the 
Asociated  Public  Communications  Offi- 
cers, Inc.,  was  held  at  Martinez,  Calif., 
^1.  Nov.  13,  1952.  The  host  was  George 
Burton  of  Contra  Costa  County. 

After  an  inspection  tour  of  Contra 
Costa  County's  excellent  new  Communi- 
cations Center  the  meeting  was  called 
to  order  at  11:15  a.m.  by  Preident 
George  Hippley.  Thirty-seven  members 
and  guests  were  in  attendance. 

The  minutes  of  the  October  meeting 
were  read  and  approved. 

A  letter  from  EI  Dorado  County  was 
read  and  discussed.  Fred  Deetkin  of 
General  Electric  is  to  contact  El  Dorado 
and  explain  the  Association's  action  re- 
garding their  request  for  frequency  clear- 
ance which  was  denied  at  last  month's 
meeting. 

President  Hippley  gave  a  brief  sum- 
mary of  the  National  Convention.    He 


stated  he  had  sent  the  National  Secre- 
tary a  check  for  $1872.93,  this  being  the 
amount  of  profit  on  the  Convention. 
President  Hippley  also  said  he  had  re- 
ceived several  nice  letters  from  some  of 
the  fellows  who  had  attended. 

Requests  for  frequency  clearance  on 
154.89  from  Cit\'  of  Los  Banos,  and  on 
155.31  mc  from  City  of  Martinez  were 
read.  These  were  approved  by  Mc- 
Murphy and  granted  on  motion  by  Bay- 
ley,  seconded  h\  Burton. 


niRF.cTOR  Hippely 

A  request  from  the  City  of  Tulare  for 
clearance  on  155.07  mc  for  Intersystem 
use  was  read.  Captain  McMurphy  re- 
quested a  clearance  on  156.03  mc  for 
Alameda  County.  This  to  be  used  in  lieu 
of  155.07  to  avoid  possible  interference 
with  the  Valley  Inters\'stem  Net.  Both 
requests  were  granted  on  motion  by 
Mason,  seconded  by  Le  Bouef. 

Ihe  meeting  was  then  adjourned  for 
lunch  at  12  :15  p.m. 

Ihe  meeting  was  recon\ ened  at  1  :25 
p.m. 

The  following  commercial  members 
gave  reports :  Fred  Deetkin  and  Bill 
Nj'e,  General  Electric ;  Zacharia  of  Zack 
Radio;  Everett  Legette  and  Barney  Ol- 
son of  Motorola  ;  Jack  Tynes  of  P.  T. 
and  T. ;  Clyde  Da\enport  of  Leece- 
Ne\ille,  and  "Robbie"  Robertson  of 
Brill  Co. 

McMurphy  reported  on  status  of  the 
Point  to  Point  selective  calling  system — 
unchanged.  A  general  discussion  of  pro- 
cedure and  policy  pertaining  to  the  sys- 
tem then  followed. 

(Continued  on  page  50) 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

FOOTHILL  POLICE  CHIEF 


Page  9 


Bv  L.  Gregg  Wallace 


Lancet,  English  medical  journal,  says 
that  there  are  two  places  in  the  world 
where  the  climate  is  equable — one  is 
Assouan,  Egypt,  and  a  little  town  in 
the  foothills  of  the  Pacific  in  California 
called  Los  Gatos. 

L.  M.  Phillips,  Chief  of  Police  of 
Los  Gatos,  California,  is  the  sort  of  a 
man  who  makes  one  feel  that  policemen 
are  friends. 

While  not  large,  the  population  is 
about  4,900,  Los  Gatos  has  problems 
not  often  found  in  cities  many  times  as 
large.  The  climate  is  so  equable,  the 
hills  so  appealing  and  the  views  so  won- 
derful that  a  problem  is  created  by  the 
man>-  world  famous  peoples  as  well 
as  the  ver\-  wealthy  who  make  Los  Gatos 
their  home. 

Few  Holdups 

There  are  also  many  who  try  to  live 
as  they  think  the  former  live  and  there- 
by a  problem  is  created.  One  that  is 
only  handled  by  the  smooth,  efficient 
friendliness  of  the  Chief  and  his  well 
trained  men. 

Because  it  is  near  to  Oakland,  San 
Francisco  and  San  Jose  one  would 
think  Los  Gatos  would  be  a  natural 
hideout    for    the    lawless    and    with    its 

Phone   9040 

"You're  at  HOME  for  the  Night" 

REDWING  MOTEL 

A. A. A.   Approved 
— Popular   Prices — 

1100   W.   Foothill   Blvd.    on    Route   66 
FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 

"TICK-TOC"   MARKET 

IMPORTED  AND  DOMESTIC  MEATS 
GROCERIES    -    BEER  AND   WINE 

806    West    San    Bernardino 

FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 

ROSE  AND  IRV'S  CAFE 

Dancing  Every  Saturday  Night  9  P.M.  til  2  A.M. 
1211     W.     Foothill     Blvd.  Telephone     9-6188 

FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 


wealthy  residents,  subject  to  holdups  or 
burglaries.  But  this  is  not  so,  due  pri- 
marih-  to  the  training  each  man  in  the 
force  receives  in  the  immediate  spot- 
ting of  a  new  face  and  a  strange  car. 


CURT'S  CAFE 


The    Finest     of    Spanish     and     American     Foods 

Short    Orders 
Short     Orders  .     Beer     and     Soft     Drinks 

456  South  Sierra   Boulevard 
FONTANA  CALIFORNIO 


FIRBANK'S  ANTIQUES 

"AT  THE  RED  BARN" 
Eddie  and  Lydia  Firfaank 

STEINS  -  FURNITURE 
GLASS  -  BRIC-A-BRAC 

13861    Harbor  Boulevard 

Tel.  KImberly  3-3241 

GARDEN  GROVE  CALIFORNIA 


Chief  L.  M.  Phillips  of  Los  Gatos 

The  men  of  the  force  have  had  the 
usual  officers'  training  which  is  required 
of  California  peace  oiBcers.  1  here  are 
the  county  crime  labs  and  the  state  labs 
to  assist  in  checking  technical  evidence 
when  a  crime  has  been  committed.  The 
cooperation  of  the  Santa  Clara  County 
Sheriff's  office  with  the  Los  Gatos  Police 
is  good.  And  the  forces  of  both  work 
hard  to  see  that  the  cooperation  stays 
good. 

Through  this  cooperation  the  city  pa- 
trol cars  work  on  twenty-four  hour 
basis.  They  are  connected  by  the  county 
radio  control  during  the  "ofi"  hours  of 
the  local  operator. 

Traffic  Problem 
To    this    setup    has    been    added    the 

training  devised  by  Chief  Phillips  that 
halts  the  burglaries  and  robbery  prob- 
lems at  their  source.  To  do  this  the  men 
are  trained  to  spot  new  faces,  strange 
actions  and  to  jot  down  the  license  num- 
ber of  any  different  car. 

Twice  recently,  culprits  have  been 
apprehended  within  a  few  hours  after 
their  crimes  due  to  this  observation-jot- 
ting plan. 

Until  recently  the  big  headache  of  the 
town  has  been  the  traffic  jam  created  by 
the  Santa  Cruz,  San  Jose,  San  Fran- 
cisco and  Oakland  traffic  on  weekends. 
It  is  not  unusual  for  more  than  20,000 
cars  to  pass  through  the  intersection  of 


Santa  Cruz  Avenue  and  Main  Street  on 
a  day.  Sometimes  a  double  line  of  traffic 
is  backed  up  for  miles  while  the  cars  roll 
slowly  through  this  bottleneck. 

It  took  three  officers  from  the  small 
Los  Gatos  department  to  handle  the 
traffic. 

Chief  Phillips  with  the  help  of  the 
townsfolk  finally  got  the  State  to  help 
install  a  self  operating  stop  and  go 
signal  at  the  critical  intersection.  Now 
the  headaches  belong  entirely  to  the  mo- 
torists. And  the  Chief's  boi,s  get  a  rest. 

Dog  Poisonings 

An  outbreak  of  dog  poisonings  during 
the  past  few  years  has  been  a  constant 
headache  to  Chief  Phillips.  As  many 
as  a  dozen  dogs  annually  have  been 
poisoned  within  the  Los  Gatos  city  lim- 
its. So  far  the  poisoner  has  not  been 
apprehended.  In  some  cities  this  would 
be  a  minor  matter.  In  Los  Gatos  it  is 
not.  The  people  there  (as  elsewhere) 
love  their  dogs  and  the  untimely  deaths 
are  the  cause  of  considerable  indignation. 
Chief  Phillips  is  working  hard  in  an  at- 
tempt to  stop  them. 

(Cnntinurd  on  pagr  Slj 

Phone  TE   4-9671 

Fo   rthe   Best   Mexican   Foods   at    Reasonable 
Prices   Visit   the 

CINCO  DE  MAYO  CAFE 

REAL  MEXICAN   FOOD 

M.  Gonzales,  Prop. 

1215  EAST  PACIFIC  COAST  HIGHWAY 

WILMINGTON  CALIFORNIA 

8  SONS  MARKET 

PLENTY  OF  PAVED  FREE  PARKING 

4410  W.  Victory 

Midway   Between   Hollywood  Way   and   Vineland 

where  Burbank  Meets   North   Hollywood 
BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 


Rittenhouse  Hatchery,  Inc. 

Baby  Chix  -  Poultry  Supplies 


331  W.  Manchester 

BUENA  PARK,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  479 


Page  10 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


WINTER  DRIVING  RULES 


Too  many  drivers  learn  the  hard  way 
about  how  to  combat  winter  driving  haz- 
ards, according  to  Professor  A.  H. 
Easton  of  the  University  of  Wisconsin. 
They  learn  by  that  sickening  sensation  of 
an  uncontrolled  skid,  warm  blood,  cold 
sweat  or  hot  tears.  There's  an  easier 
way,  he  said. 

Easton,  director  of  the  university's 
automotive  safety  research  project  and 
a  test  expert  for  the  National  Safety 
Council's  Committee  on  \Vinter  Driving 
Hazards,  declared  that  a  little  study  and 
observation  of  six  fundamental  rules  will 
prevent  many  thousands  of  annual  traffic 
tragedies  and  troubles  during  snow-ice 
weather. 

Streamlined  Summary 

These  new  rules  are  a  streamlined 
summary  of  many  important  recom- 
mendations contained  in  a  new  booklet 
just  published.  Entitled  "Here  Are  The 
Facts"  or  "Basic  Winter  Driving 
Rules,"  it's  free  for  the  asking  by  writ- 
ing to  the  National  Safety  Council, 
Chicago  11,  111.  It  can  be  read  in  about 
fifteen  minutes  according  to  Prof. 
Easton,  although  it  sets  down  for  the 
first  time  the  results  of  11  j-ears  of  test 
research  by  the  Council's  committee. 

The  booklet  is  aimed  at  reducing  the 
high  death  and  accident  rates  resulting 
from  inadequate  traction  and  reduced 
visability  —  the  major  winter  driving 
problems  from  November  through  Feb- 
ruary. 

Six  basic  rules  for  safe  winter  driving 
follow : 

1.  Get  the  feel  of  the  road.  Try 
your  brakes  occasionally,  while  driving 
slowly  and  away  from  other  traffic,  to 
find  out  just  how  slippery  the  road  is. 

2.  Slow  doivn.  Adjust  your  speed  to 
road  and  weather  conditions  so  that  you 
can  stop  or  maneuver  safely. 

3.  Keep  zv'indshield  elear.  'V'ou  must 
see  the  danger  and  avoid  it,  so  be  sure 
your  headlights,  windshield  wiper  blades 
and  defrosters  are  in  topnotch  cotidition. 

4.  Use  tire  chains  on  snoiv  and  ice. 
They  cut  stopping  distances  about  in  half, 
and  increase  starting  and  hill  climbing 
traction  by  four  to  seven  times.  Even 
with  the  help  of  chains,  however,  lower 
than  normal  speeds  are  a  must  on  snow 
and  ice. 

5.  Pump  your  brakes  to  slow  doivn 
or  stop.  Jamming  them  on  can  lock  the 
wheels  and  throw  your  car  into  a  dan- 
gerous skid. 


6.  Folloiv  at  a  safe  distance.  Keep 
well  back  of  the  car  ahead  so  you  have 
room  to  stop.  Remember  that,  without 
tire  chains,  it  takes  three  to  12  times  as 
far  to  stop  on  snow  and  ice  as  on  dry 
concrete. 

Other  important  findings  by  the  com- 
mittee, composed  of  33  experts  in  fields 
of  automotive  engineering,  law  enforce- 
ment and  traffic  safety  education,  in- 
clude the  following: 

Longer  Skids 

All  tires,  except  big  truck  tires,  are 
now  made  largely  of  synthetic  rubber. 
Synthetic  tires  wear  better,  perform  nor- 
mally on  dry  or  wet  pavements  and  have 
other  advantages.  But  on  snow  and  ice 
they  skid  about  8  percent  farther  and 
have  14  to  35  percent  poorer  forward 
traction  ability  than  prewar  natural  rub- 
ber tires. 

Special  winter  tires  of  25  different 
types  were  tested  for  traction.  The  tests 
showed  that  while  some  tires  gave  im- 
proved traction  under  certain  conditions 
over  conventional  tires,  their  overall  im- 
provement is  not  great  enough  to  war- 
rant less  caution  when  driving  on  slip- 
pery surfaces.  The  same  tests  also 
demonstrated  that  special  winter  tire 
treads  do  not  approach  the  performance 
of  reinforced  tire  chains,  and  the  report 
concludes  that  "while  some  of  these 
tires  can  be  considered  a  palliative,  they 
certainly  are  not  the  answer  to  severe 
snow  and  ice  conditions." 

Chains  Are  Best 

Describing  tire  chains  as  the  best  self- 
help  available  to  the  driver,  the  com- 
mittee said  reinforced  tire  chains  reduce 
braking  distances  on  both  snow  and  ice 
about  half,  increase  forward  traction  on 
:ce  about  seven  times,  and  on  packed 
r.now  out  pull  conventional  tires  nearly 
four  times. 

While  most  tests  have  been  made  on 
passenger  cars,  research  in  the  last  two 
years  has  been  concentrated  on  the  jack- 
knife  hazard  to  tractor  semitrailer  trucks 
on  snow  and  ice.  The  report  summarizes 
as  follows : 

"It  has  become  evident  from  this  re- 
search that  the  best  means  of  preventing 
jackknifing  is  to  keep  all  tires  rolling,  in 
order  to  maintain  steering  ability  and  at 
the  same  time  get  a  maximum  grip  for 
slowing  or  accelerating.  Due  to  increased 
traction  provided,  it  was  found  that  re- 
inforced tire  chains  made  jackknifing 
virtually  impossible  with  a  tractor  semi- 


trailer combination  on  level  lake  ice  at 
20  miles  an  hour.  Similarly,  it  was 
found  that  recovery  from  jackknife 
angles  of  as  much  as  90  degrees  was 
possible  with  front  or  all-wheel  drive 
tractors." 

The  Council's  tests  were  conducted 
last  winter  on  frozen  lakes  and  winter 
roads  near  Clintonville,  Wis.  They  were 
under  the  direction  of  Prof.  Ralph  A. 
Moyer,  research  engineer.  Institute  of 
Transportation  and  Traffic  Engineering, 
University  of  California,  who  is  chair- 
man of  the  committee,  and  T.  J.  Car- 
michael,  administrative  engineer  of  the 
General  Motors  Pro\-ing  Ground.  Fur- 
ther tests  will  start  February  2. 


TAPE  PROTECTS   DRIVERS 

Many  tragic  accidents  are  caused  by 
cars  with  burned  out  tail  lights,  tail  lights 
that  are  hard  to  see  by  the  driver  behind 
or  cars  that  are  just  not  seen.  There  is 
absolutely  no  reason  for  accidents  like 
this  anymore  because  the  Safelite  Divi- 
sion of  Sylvan  Sweets  Company  in  East- 
on, Penna.,  has  come  out  with  an  inex- 
pensive Safelite  reflecting  auto  bumper 
kit  made  with  Scotchlite. 

It's  easy  to  apply.  All  one  has  to  do 
is  peel  off  the  paper  backing  and  apply 
it  to  the  bumper.  It  reflects  a  brilliant 
red  when  headlights  hit  it  and  it's  proven 
that  it  is  85  times  brighter  than  a  white 
painted  surface.  Kits  of  silver  and  red 
are  also  being  made  up  for  use  on  bi- 
cycles. 

Many  orgam'zations  like  the  P.T.A., 
Civic  Clubs,  Junior  Chambers  of  Com- 
merce, etc.,  and  police  departments  are 
sponsoring  drives  to  put  reflecting  tape 
on  cars,  trucks,  buses,  bicycles  and  even 
on  police  uniforms  in  order  to  cut  down 
the  accident  rate. 

Police  departments  and  safety  groups 
are  overwhelmingly  in  favor  of  these  kits 
because  it  adds  an  extra  margin  of  safety 
to  vehicles  and  it  has  been  proven  by  the 
United  States  Army,  United  States 
Navy,  Marine  Corps  and  the  Coast 
Guard.  It  is  also  being  used  on  highway 
barricades,  mail  boxes,  walking  sticks, 
policemen's  gloves  and  many  other  things 
where  protection  is  needed. 

Over  5,000  kits  were  sold  in  the  City 
of  Richmond,  Va.,  in  the  first  week  that 
they  were  shown.  Many  other  cities  are 
praising  the  safety  factors  on  the  cars 
using  these  kits. 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  11 


BEWARE  OF  WINTER'S  DEADLY  TRICKS! 


Test  Facts  on  Stops,  Starts,  and  Hill  Climbing 
Ability  of  Tires  and  Chains  on  Snow  and  Ice 


ir^on  Hdrd-packed  Snow. 


-=^^»- 


PER  CENT  OF  GRADEABILITY 

3  4.3% 
6.3% 

5.6% 
7.9% 
7.6% 


23.5% 


TIRE  CHAINS 


.on  Glare  Ice 


Synthetic  Rubber  Tires. 


1227 


Natural  Rubber  Tires 


Winterized  Tires . 


209  ft 


188  ft 


Mud-Snov/  Tires. 


201  FT 


Winterized  Mud-Snow  Tires. 


190  ft 


Reinforced  Tire  Chains. 


77  ft 


National  Safety  Council  Tests  reveal 

facts  to  help  you  avoid  accidents  and  traffic  tie- 
ups  this  winter.  These  four  charts  show  average 
results.  Skid  distances  of  bare  tires  vary  as  much 
as  130  per  cent,  however,  with  changing  tempera- 
tures or  sunshine.  At  4  degrees  below  zero  tires 
without  chains  can  stop  on  ice  in  about  110  feet 
at  20  m.p.h.,  but  the  same  car,  at  same  speed, 
takes  about  250  feet  to  stop  on  same  ice  at  30 
degrees  above  zero.  This  variable  has  led  many  a 
driver  to  disaster.  Temperatures  of  15  degrees 
above  zero  or  higher  put  a  moist  film  on  ice  or 
hard -packed  snow  which,  without  tire  chains, 
greatly  increases  skidding. 


AVERAGE  DRAWBAR   PULL  ON  ICE 

0      200     400     too      100      1000      1300 


CONVENTIONAL  TIRES  143  LBS 

WINTERIZED  TIRES  170  LBS 
MUD-SNOW  TIREsl50  LBS 
WINTERIZED  MUD-SNOW  TIREsl92  LBS 


IRE  CHAINS    1070 


LBS 


Above  are  National  Safety  Council  facts,  based  on  tests  by  its  Committee  on  Winter 
Driving  Hazards.  For  comparison,  normal  braking  distances  of  autos  on  dry  and  wet 
concrete  are  only  about  21  and  26  feet  respectively.  Study  of  each  chart  may  save  your 
life,  or  at  least  prevent  trouble.  For  each  "braking  distance"  above  you  must  add  22 
feet,  which  is  distance  traveled  during  average  "reaction  time"  to  get  your  foot  on  brake. 


Page  12 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   195s 


Police  Promotion  Examination  Questions 


In  the  November  issue  of  this  journal 
the  following  numbered  statements,  on 
the  subject  Evidence,  were  true:  1,  3, 
4,  6,  7,  8,  9,  11,  13,  14,  17,  19,  20,  24, 
29,  30,  32,  35. 

1.  Of  the  California  Codes,  the  Code 
of  Civil  Procedure  deals  only  with  the 
presentation  and  handling  of  cases  in 
court  and  the  Penal  Code  with  crimes 
only. 

2.  Sex  crime  convictions  rank  low  be- 
cause arresting  officers  fail  to  properly 
present  such  cases  through  lack  of  ex- 
perience in  the  handling  of  such  cases. 

3.  Every  person  remaining  present  at 
a  place  of  riot  except  officers  and  persons 
assisting  them  in  attempting  to  disperse 
the   rioters   is   guilty  of   a  misdemeanor. 

4.  The  police  courts  have  jurisdiction 
of  all  cases  of  Assault  and   Battery. 

5.  The  circumstances  under  which  an 
instrument  (legal)  was  made  may  be 
shown  to  aid  the  court  in  its  interpre- 
tation. 

6.  The  order  of  proof  in  criminal  ac- 
tions is  regulated  by  law. 

7.  In  so-called  "entrapment"  cases 
both  the  officer  who  created  the  situation 
and  the  party  arrested  are  law  violators. 

8.  Moral  certainty  is  sufficient  to  es- 
tablish guilt  of  a  felon. 

9.  Unless  a  burglar  is  armed  with  a 
deadly  weapon  or  so  arms  himself  while 
in  the  commission  of  the  offense  or  as- 
saults a  person  while  in  the  commission 
of  the  offense  he  cannot  commit  burglary 
of  the  first  degree  of  a  dwelling  house 
in  the  night  time  unless  the  dwelling 
house  is  inhabited. 

10.  The  maximum  punishment  for 
burglary  of  the  first  degree  is  the  same 
as  the  maximum  punishment  for  robbery 
of  the  first  degree. 

11.  If  one  person  maliciously  and  will- 
fully disturbs  the  peace  or  quiet  of  an- 
other person  by  loud  noise,  the  doing  so 
is  a  misdemeanor. 

12.  Failure  of  a  sheriff  to  pay  over 
fines  coming  into  his  hands  according  to 
law  and  within  twenty  days  after  receipt 
thereof  is  a  misdemeanor. 

13.  The  maximum  punishment  for 
first  degree  arson  is  the  same  as  the 
maximum  punishment  for  first  degree 
robbery. 

14.  Major  crimes  have  fallen  off  dur- 
ing the  past  five  years. 

15.  The  phrase  "night  time,"  as  used 
in  the  chapter  of  the  Penal  Code  dealing 
with  the  crime  of  burglary,  is  defined  and 
has  the  same  meaning  as  the  words 
"night  time"  have  in  the  Vehicle  Act  of 
this  state. 


16.  Every  person,  except  a  police  offi- 
cer, having  a  "pick  lock"  in  his  posses- 
sion when  arrested  is  guilty  of  a  misde- 
meanor. 

17.  The  driving  away  of  the  personal 
property  of  another  is  larceny. 

18.  The  stealing  of  a  goat  is  grand 
larceny. 

19.  Sex  troubles  are  the  principal  rea- 
son for  the  disappearance  of  minors  from 
their  homes. 

20.  Every  persons  who  enters  a  house 
with  the  malicious  intention  of  resisting 
an  officer  is  guilty  of  burglary. 

21.  Night  time  burglaries  are  first 
degree  burglaries. 

22.  Day  time  burglaries  are  burglaries 
of  the  second  degree. 

2i.  A  complaint  for  any  misdemeanor 
triable  in  a  Police  Court  must  be  filed 
within  one  year  after  its  commission. 

24.  If  a  police  judge  is  satisfied  that 
a  public  offense  triable  before  him  has 
been  committed  he  must  in  all  cases  issue 
a  warrant  for  the  arrest  of  the  accused. 

25.  The  crime  of  forgery  has  shown 
an   increase   during  the  past  five  years. 

26.  The  stealing  of  a  mule  valued  at 
$150.00  is  petty  larceny. 

27.  Second  degree  burglary  may  be 
committed  in  the  night  time. 

28.  If  a  change  of  venue  is  legally 
granted,  the  case  must  be  transferred  to 
another  justice  or  judge  of  the  same 
county. 

29.  For  all  public  offenses  the  court 
must  determine  all  questions  of  law 
which  may  arise  at  the  trial. 

30.  Accuracy,  as  to  results,  is  the  only 
difference  between  ballistic  and  finger- 
print identification. 

31.  In  some  court  proceedings  the 
jury  may  decide  questions  of  both  law 
and  fact. 

32.  In  a  police  court,  after  hearing  all 
the  evidence,  the  jury  may  render  their 
verdict  in  court,  without  retiring,  if  they 
so  wish. 

33.  A  complaint  may  include  more 
than  one  allegation  but  every  allegation 
made  in  a  complaint  must  be  proved. 

34.  It  is  legal  that  a  witness  may  re- 
fresh his  memory  in  court  from  any 
memorandum  which  he  may  have  in  his 
possession. 

35.  Neither  party  to  a  trial  may  im- 
peach its  own  witness. 

36.  So-called  "Contraband  Control" 
is  maintained  for  the  securing  of  public 
revenue  and  the  protection  of  public 
health  and  morals. 

37.  In  a  trial,  secondary  evidence,  as 
such,  is  not  admissible. 


38.  Common  Law  rules  that  penal 
statutes  are  to  be  strictly  construed 
govern  our  Penal  Code  interpretations. 

39.  Words  used  in  the  Penal  Code  in 
the  so-called  "present  tense"  include  the 
past  as  well  as  the  present. 

40.  Conditions  may  warrant  charging 
dog  stealing  as  grand  larceny. 

41.  X  buys  brass  used  by  a  railroad 
company  but  fails  to  use  due  diligence 
in  the  matter  of  ascertaining  that  the 
seller  has  a  legal  right  to  sell  the  brass. 
X  is  open  to  a  charge  of  felony. 

42.  John  Doe  embezzles  property  in 
Oregon  and  is  arrested  in  San  Francisco 
on  the  charge.  He  may  be  tried  and  con- 
victed here. 

43.  Forging  of  numbers  on  an  engine 
may  be  discovered  because  the  stamping 
of  the  numbers  caused  chemical  changes 
in  the  metal  when  the  automobile  engine 
was  being  numbered  at  the  factory. 

44.  Every  person  who,  in  the  City 
and  County  of  San  Francisco,  saves  any 
property  from  fire,  and  for  two  days 
thereafter  willfully  neglects  to  notify  the 
Fire  Marshal  regarding  such  property 
is  guilty  of  a  felony. 

45.  First  degree  burglary  can  be  com- 
mitted in  the  daytime  only  if  the  party 
so  doing  is  armed  with  a  deadly  weapon 
or  so  arms  himself  while  in  the  commis- 
sion of  the  burglary,  or  assaults  any  per- 
son while  committing  such  burglary. 

46.  Committed  in  the  night  time,  a 
burglary  of  a  dwelling  house  might,  un- 
der certain  circumstances,  be  only  second 
degree  burglary. 

47.  The  jury  must  reach  a  verdict  on 
a  case  submitted  to  them  before  they  can 
be  legally  dismissed. 

48.  A  coroner's  jury  must,  as  a  mini- 
mum, have  nine  jurors. 

49.  There  can  be  only  one  inquest  on 
any  one  (dead)  body. 

50.  One  of  the  principal  uses  of  a  so- 
called  "Traffic  Flow  Map"  is  to  show 
whether  additional  traffic  patrolmen  may 
be  required,  or  there  is  need  for  addi- 
tional traffic  lights. 


INVITING  DISASTER 

The  motorist  who  insists  on  crashing 
through  blind  intersections  at  a  break- 
neck pace,  driving  against  the  lights,  or 
merely  hesitating  for  a  moment  at  the 
Stop  signs,  is  inviting  disaster  and  quite 
possibly  death,  warns  the  National  Auto- 
mobile Club.  You  just  can't  be  too  care- 
ful at  the  corners. 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  13 


SACRAMENTO  SCRAMBLE 


Old  time  traffic  policemen  still  shud- 
der and  start  at  the  goings  on  along  K 
Street  in  Sacramento  these  days,  even 
though  tliey  have  been  watching  the 
somewhat  weird  doings  for  more  than 
three  montlis. 

And  you  can't  blame  an  officer  who  has 
spent  years  to  tell  pedestrians  to  keep 
to  the  crosswalks,  etc.,  for  almost  jump- 
ing out  of  his  size  elevens  when  you  see 
what  happens : 


efficient  plans  found  \et  for  getting 
walkers  and  motorists  alike  through 
bus\'  intersections  at  top  speed  and  with 
a  minimum  of  accidents. 

It  is  the  Scramble  plan  for  regulating 
intersection  traffic,  and  after  months  of 
trial,  it  has  been  pronounced  a  great 
success  by  city  officials,  many  of  whom 
had  lots  of  doubts  when  the  idea  first 
came  up. 


lights  flash  green  in  all  directions.  Walk- 
ers can  take  their  pick  of  which  way  they 
want  to  cross. 

When  the  change  comes,  all  pedes- 
trian lights  turn  red.  The  drivers,  of 
course,  can't  scramble  like  the  walkers, 
and  must  take  their  turns  at  the  green 
light. 

But  the  motorists,  too,  get  a  big  break: 
They  can  turn  off  K  Street  speedily, 
because  there  are  no  pedestrians  in  the 


SCRAMBLI.  TRAFFIC— WHEN   THE    PEDESTRIAN    SIGNALS   TLKN   GREEN— AN V  1  HING   GUES. 


\Vhen  the  lights  flash  green  for  pe- 
destrians they  gyrate  like  women  in  a 
bargain  basement.  They  dash  diagonally 
across  the  middle  of  the  intersection, 
and  scurry  every  which  way,  ignoring 
all  of  the  old  rules. 

Great  Success 

It  looks  like  pandemonium,  but  in- 
stead,  is  one  of  the  most  modern,  and 


In  fact,  it  has  proved  so  successful  that 
practically  all  of  the  busier  intersec- 
tions along  K  Street,  the  main  shopping 
center  in  Sacramento,  are  to  be  con- 
verted to  the  Scramble  system. 

How  It  Works 

This  is  how  it  works: 
At  interval  lights  for  all  auto  traffic 
turn    red    and    the    pedestrian    "walk" 


crosswalks  to  get  in  the  way  of  ma- 
chines. Any  motorist,  who  has  waited  in 
line  for  long  periods  to  make  a  simple 
right  turn  at  a  busy  intersection  knows 
how  important  this  is.  Under  the  old 
system  the  pedestrian  has  the  right  of 
way  on  the  green  light  and  woe  to  the 
motorist  who  tries  to  edge  ahead  of  him. 
(Continued  on  page  32) 


Page  14 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


PISTOL  POINTING 


The  end  of  the  1952  season  came  to  a 
brilliant  close  on  Sunday,  November  16, 
1952,  with  one  of  the  largest  crowds  we 
have  had  in  a  long  time — something  like 
135  shooters  which  might  not  seem  as  tho 
it  were  a  lot  of  pistoleers  to  the  average 
person  but  when  you  compare  135  just  as 
an  every  month  match  with  around  80  at 
an  eastern  championship  match  it  really 
is  something  of  a  crowd.  One  hundred 
and  thirty-five  shooters  is  just  about  as 
nice  a  crowd  to  handle  at  the  Police 
Range  as  one  could  want  and  it  also 
makes  for  an  early  getaway  for  the  gents 
who  have  to  skedaddle  home  to  take  ma 
and  the  kids  out  for  the  afternoon — all 
of  which  the  gang  likes. 

The  weather  was  ideal  for  the  day's 
outing  and  when  the  gun  smoke  had 
blown  out  over  the  lake  there  stood  Ser- 
geant Karl  Schaugaard,  of  the  San  Fran- 
cisco Police  Department,  on  top  of  the 
heap  with  the  high  aggregate  medal  pin- 
ned on  his  manly  chest. 

We  do  not  wish  to  bother  you  with 
the  scores  of  the  day's  shooting  but  in- 
stead will  give  you  the  dope  on  the  yearh 
aggregate  scores  and  the  winners  of  each 
division  for  the  1952  championships.  It 
is  based  on  the  highest  three  scores  of  the 
five  matches.  The  yearly  winner  in  tht- 
open  class  was  Ted  Elton  of  the  U.  E. 
Navy  (with  a  total  of  3166  points),  who 
is  at  this  writing  somewhere  on  the  high 
seas  as  he  was  assigned  to  a  ship  a  couple 
of  months  ago  and  was  unable  to  shoot  in 
Sunday's  match  so  was  not  present  to  re- 
ceive the  silver  lazy  Susan  as  the  first 
prize.  In  second  place  was  Karl  Schau- 
gaard just  one  point  behind  Ted  and  both 
with  an  average  of  1055. 

The  scores  at  the  end  of  this  article  are 
for  the  yearly  aggregate  matches  while 
the  context  of  the  article  is  from  the 
matches  of  Sunday. 

Some  Never  Learn 
Some  of  the  shooters  will  never  learn 
that  it's  dynamite  to  pony  up  a  buck  and 
challenge  a  target  after  it  has  been  re- 
checked.  Mort  Kresteller,  the  peninsula 
auto  dealer,  learned  via  the  buck  route. 
Looking  thru  his  scope  he  claimed  his 
score  should  have  been  8  points  higher 
than  as  shown.  Up  comes  the  target. 
Away  goes  the  buck.  A  sad  and  sorrier 
Mort  as  his  scope  failed  to  see  that  the 
fat  "8"  right  on  the  line  and  just  out  of 
scope  range.   Our  advice  to  Mort  was  to 


Byi  J.  Ross  DUNNIGAN 

have  Santa  bring  him  a  new  scope  that 
shows  the  whole  target  and  not  only  the 
black. 

Had  a  chat  with  Captain  Dick  Gadd, 
U.  S.  Army,  who  has  just  returned  from 
a  tour  of  duty  in  Japan.  AVhile  in  Japan 
he  teamed  up  with  Major  Bill  Hancock 
who  5'ou  all  know  as  one  of  our  top  shoot- 
ers— in  fact  he  was  on  the  Olympic  Team 
again  this  year.  Dick  tells  us  that  Bill  is 
in  good  shape  and  still  making  the  boys 
sit  up  and  take  notice  of  his  scores. 


Ted  Ei.ton 

Double  Action 

All  "Pedro"  Burrel,  ace  Immigrant 
Agent,  was  bug  eyed  with  wonderment 
and  amazement  when  he  looked  over  the 
guys  on  the  line  and  spotted  Bill  Madden 
of  Benicia,  shooting  his  timed  and  rapid 
fire  string  double  action.  Al  was  of  the 
opinion  that  Buffalo  Bill  and  Hopalong 
Cassidy  were  the  only  double  action 
shooters  who  were  able  to  hit  anything 
they  shot  at.  We  might  add  as  an  after 
thought  that  Bill  only  shot  the  one  match 
in  the  grand  western  wild  west  style  and 
in  the  other  matches  went  back  to  his  sin- 
gle action  method  and  with  much  better 
res\ilts,  too! 

Then  we  have  the  case  of  Bob  Hill 
who  is  still  wondering  who  put  that  fifth 
shot  on  his  target  but  when  Bob  was 
shooting  one  of  those  Spanish  "Star" 
guns  and  in  all  probability  didn't  know 
when  to  stop  jamming  shells  into  it  as 


it's  a  tricky  gun  to  use.  Or  maybe  the 
gun,  being  Spanish,  wasn't  used  to  our 
ways  of  shooting  and  just  took  an  extra 
shot  for  luck.  Another  gent  who  was 
quite  disturbed  along  these  lines  was  "M. 
D."  McVey,  of  the  Olympic  Club  who 
found  an  extra  shot  on  his  target.  How- 
ever, Mac  wasn't  disturbed  about  it  as 
it's  old  stuff  to  him  so  he  just  took  his 
time  in  the  alibi  run  and  gained  a  couple 
of  more  points  thereby. 

San  Jose  Matches 

The  San  Jose  Pistol  Club  had  thirty 
shooters  at  their  November  5th  match 
which  was  very  gratifying  to  them  as  it 
shows  the  shooting  gents  must  like  the 
matches.  The  winner  this  month  was 
Jay  Dickerson  of  the  San  Jose  Pistol 
Club.  An  extra  medal  was  given  in  the 
marksman  class  due  to  the  increased 
attendance. 

Bob  Chow,  the  shooting  oriental,  was 
just  released,  for  the  second  time  from  a 
25-month  hitch  in  the  navy  and  is  gonna 
be  around  from  now  on  to  make  the  Mas- 
ter shooters  hew  to  the  line.  Bob  started 
off  with  a  poor  score  in  the  first  match 
but  from  then  on  was  in  the  medal  class 
in  every  other  match  either  in  first  or  sec- 
ond place.  Look  out  for  Bob  "O'Chow" 
as  he  is  Irishly  called. 

Dick  Thomas,  owner  of  the  Public 
Target  Range  and  captain  of  the  Public 
Target  Range  team  is  quite  proud  of  his 
boys  as  they  won  Sunday's  "B"  Class 
team  match  and  also  the  championship  of 
the  Class  "B"  teams. 

Roseburg  at  Helm 

The  Coast  Card  League,  Inc.,  an- 
nounced that  the  officers  for  the  coming 
season  will  be  with  Evar  Roseberg  at 
the  helm  with  Art  Gibson  as  vice-chair- 
man. AVe  understand  Jack  Valerga  is  also 
on  the  board  of  directors  bench  and  in 
due  time  will  be  back  again  with  us 
pistol  shooting. 

And  of  all  the  people  whom  we  didn't 
expect  to  see  was  Paul  Wormser  of  the 
S&W  canned  goods  outfit.  Paul  hasn't 
been  shooting  for  a  long  spell  and  de- 
cided to  come  out  once  more  and  give  the 
guns  another  tryout. 

Bill  Koehlner  is  very  mad  at  the  gent 
standing  alongside  of  him  for  having  shot 
five  shots  on  his  target.  The  reason  Bill 
is  so  mad  is  because  the  five  shots  by  the 
culprit  were  better  than  his  own  shots 
and  he  couldn't  figure  out  a  way  to  keep 
them. 

(Cuiilinued  on  page  3-1) 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  15 


Midnight  Manhunt 


The  first  shots  were  fired  at  1 :10  a.m. 
on  the  morning  of  November  7,  1952. 
Five  bullets  spraying  from  the  flaming 
muzzle  of  a  light  caliber  hand  gun,  one 
of  them  finding  a  fleshy  target  a  feu- 
feet  away  .  .  .  and  for  the  second  time 
in  less  than  two  months  the  blue  uniform 
of  a  San  Francisco  officer  was  stained 
dark  crimson  by  the  blood  that  oozed 
from  a  gunshot  wound  received  in  the 
line  of  duty. 


Chief  English 

Officer  George  Carrozi  sat  down  ab- 
ruptly, feeling,  for  the  moment,  more  like 
a  man  who  had  ben  punched  in  the 
stomach  than  one  who  had  been  shot. 
Then  he  emptied  his  thirty-eight  at  the 
shadowy  figures  that  dashed  down  the 
gloom  of  Girard  Street  toward  safety. 
The  exchange  of  gunfire  touched  off  one 
of  the  largest  manhunts  in  the  recent  his- 
tory of  the  San  Francisco  Police  Depart- 
ment. But  the  story  did  not  start  with 
George  Carrozi.  In  fact  it  did  not  even 
begin  on  the  San  Francisco  side  of  the 
Bay. 

It  was  Tuesday,  November  4th,  1952. 
Election  Day.  No  one  had  their  minds 
on  much  of  anything  except  the  picking 
of  a  chief  executive  for  the  L^nited  States 
and  representatives  to  Congress  and  other 
elective  officers. 

Of  course  there  were  exceptions.  Peo- 
ple stood  by  deathbeds  as  they  do  on  every 
day  of  the  year  and  cared  little  about  the 
outcome  at  the  polls.  Others  smashed 
up  their  cars  and  were  carted  off  to  hos- 
pitals .  A  few  thousand  bartenders  voted, 
then  wandered  around  aimlessly,  asking 


each  other  why  their  days  off  always  had 
to  come  when  nothing  was  doing. 

And  in  the  enlisted  barracks  at  Ham- 
ilton Air  Force  Base  a  pair  of  airmen 
hatched  a  plan  to  finance  a  night's  out- 
ing. The  plan  included  firearms  and  a 
Novato  druggist.  The  first  job  was  ap- 
parently well  planned  and  cased. 

Just  at  the  closing  hour  the  airmen 
approached  the  Marin  County  pharma- 
cist with  drawn  guns  and  cold,  threaten- 
ing voices. 

"This  is  a  stickup.  Do  what  you  are 
told  and  you  won't  get  hurt." 

The  druggist  stared  at  the  menacing 
little  weapons,  moved  his  gaze  to  the 
faces  of  the  men  who  held  them,  and 
complied.  A  few  moments  later  he  found 
himself  riding  wildly  through  the  Marin 
County  hills  in  his  own  car.  And  shortly 
thereafter  he  was  relieved  of  $130  and 
his  wrist  watch. 

A  few  hours  passed.  The  enlisted  air- 
men made  their  way  across  the  Golden 
Gate  Bridge  and  into  San  Francisco. 
They  spent  a  good  chunk  of  the  $130  and 
started  looking  for  a  source  of  added  re\- 
enue.  Seamen  Alfus  D.  Cowley  of  445 
Lakeview  Avenue  appeared  to  be  a  good 
prospect.  The  two  young  men  forced 
their  way  into  his  car,  poked  guns  in  his 
back  and  forced  him  to  drive  them  to  a 
deserted  area.  There  they  emptied  his 
pockets  and  found  themselves  richer  by 
the  staggering  sum  of  three  dollars. 

Three  days  passed  and  the  duo  re- 
mained inactive.  Then,  early  Friday  eve- 
ning they  headed  from  the  air  force  base 
toward  San  Francisco.  At  nine  o'clock 
they  felt  the  need  for  funds.  At  nine 
forty-five  P.  M.  they  watched  Vincent 
Ortez  of  2800  San  Bruno  Avenue  mo\- 
ing  through  the  nightly  routine  of  clos- 
ing his  service  station.  Seconds  later  they 
invaded  the  station  and  produced  their 
guns. 

"Get  into  your  car,"  one  of  them  or- 
dered.   "Take  the  money  bag  with  you." 

Ortiz  complied  and  looked  back  for 
instructions  as  the  pair  climbed  in  be- 
hind him. 

"Drive,"  one  of  the  gunmen  ordered. 

Ortiz  started  the  engine,  slid  the  car 
into  gear  and  rolled  it  out  of  the  service 
station.  ^Vhen  he  had  gone  about  six 
blocks  he  was  ordered  to  pull  up  at  the 
curb. 

"All  right,  give  us  the  money  and  get 
out,"  one  of  the  airmen  directed.  "Don't 
call  for  the  cops  or  we'll  come  back  and 
get  you." 

Ortiz  had  barely  reached  the  sidewalk 
when  the  car  roared  away  into  the  dark- 


ness. He  stood  silently  in  the  gloom 
until  the  twin  tail  lights  of  his  car  ap- 
peared to  merge  into  one.  It  did  not  take 
long.  Then  he  headed  for  a  telephone. 
Minutes  later  every  patrol  car  in  the  city 
had  a  description  of  the  bandits  and  the 
victim's  car. 

Hours  passed.  For  a  while  it  appeared 
that  the  bandits,  who  had  escaped  with 
$150  in  addition  to  the  car,  had  made 
their  escape  good.  The  vehicle  was  be- 
coming just  another  number  on  the  hot 
car  file.  A  fresh  number,  however.  And 
the  holdup  was  another  case  for  the  rob- 
bery detail. 

Shorth'  after  one  A.M.,  George  Car- 
rozzi,  a  beat  man  with  three  \ears'  expe- 
rience on  the  force  was  tra\elling  alone 
through  the  shadows  of  Girard  Street. 
Like  most  officers  Carrozzi  watched  li- 
cense plates  as  a  matter  of  course.  He 
did  a  double  take  when  the  holdup  car 
passed.  There  was  no  doublt  in  his  mind 
that  it  uas  the  right  car  or  that  it  con- 
tained the  right  men.  1  he  license  number 
and 'the  description  of  the  bandits  had 
been  broadcast  regularly  during  the  past 
three  hours. 


Inspector  Frank  Ahern 

Carrozzi  did  not  have  a  radio  handy. 
The  nearest  call  box  was  some  distance 
away  and  any^vay  a  call  to  communica- 
tions would  probably  let  the  holdup  man 
escape.  But  he  did  have  his  own  car.  His 
next  movements  were  almost  the  result 
of  reflex  action. 

(Continued  on  page  37) 


Page  16 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


Personal  Identification  In  Early  America 


During  those  years  directly  preceding 
the  over-trustful  use  of  anthropometry 
in  American  law  enforcement,  only 
crude  and  unsystematic  attempts  were 
made  to  establish  and  record  personal 
identity.  It  is  little  wonder  that  Bertil- 
lon's  offering  was  welcomed  enthusiasti- 
cally. Most  of  the  larger  centers  of 
civilization  saw  crime  conditions  that 
were  frankly  appalling,  and  dire  need 
existed  for  both  punitive  and  determin- 
ative recourses.  Popular  resorts,  com- 
mon to  nearly  all  countries,  including 
Colonial  America,  embraced  tattooing, 
branding,  and  even  more  sanguinary 
mutilation.  These,  and  especially  brand- 
ing, were  then  adjudged  to  serve  the 
double  purpose  of  identification  and  pun- 
ishment. Brand  marks  were  used  by  law 
in  Plymouth  as  early  as  1658,  the  prac- 
tice continuing  until  well  into  the  19th 
century.  Throughout  this  period,  cur- 
rent customs  also  included  flogging, 
dragging  through  the  streets  by  oxen,  the 
pillory,  the  severing  of  one  or  both  ears, 
together  with  more  vital,  if  less  conspicu- 
ous, disfigurement.  In  branding,  the  fa- 
vorite anatomical  areas  were  the  fore- 
head, cheeks,  breast,  forearm  and  hands. 

Little  Moderation 

The  type  of  ofifense  was  often  indi- 
cated by  its  initial  leter,  such  as  "M" 
for  murder,  and  "T"  for  theft;  fre- 
quently these  were  burned  into  the  ball 
of  the  defendant's  thumb.  History  at- 
tests that,  on  exceptional  occasions,  mod- 
eration tempered  the  severe  Colonial  en- 
forcement program,  when  now  and  then 
the  gesture  of  branding  was  symbolic 
only,  and  the  offender  was  lightly  touch- 
ed with  a  cold  iron.  Furthermore,  it  is 
recorded  that  a  prisoner  might  also,  in 
rare  circumstances,  bribe  the  official  to 
burn  a  trice  less  deeply  than  was  cus- 
tomary when  applying  the  heated  metal. 
But  from  all  indications  it  would  appear 
that  these  extenuations  were  far  from 
common. 

It  is  noteworthy  that  many  of  the 
more  radical  devices  of  marking  and 
maiming,  as  practiced  in  early  America, 
are  not  to  be  found  in  English  law 
proper,  and  very  probably  were  the  in- 
vention of  uncompromising  Puritans  and 
Quakers,  whose  newly-acquired  religious 
freedom  may  have  somewhat  overstepped 
the  boundaries  of  tolerance.  In  this  con- 
nection, it  should  be  noted  that  branding 
and  other  equally  barbarous  inflictions 
were  rigidly  enforced  under  sanction 
of  the  now  benignly-esteemed  William 


By  B.  C.  Bridges 

This  is  the  first  of  a  scries  of  articles 
prepared  for  the  Police  and  Peace  Of- 
ficers Journal  by  Mr.  Bridges.  He 
is  one  of  the  world's  foremost  authorities 
on  fingerprints  and  police  science.  He  is 
now  teaching  at  the  College  of 
San  Francisco. 


B.  C.  Bridges 

Penn    within     his    "City    of    Brotherly 
Love." 

Puritan  Justice 
But  even  stern  Puritan  "justice" 
could  be  diverted  from  its  bitter  course 
by  the  touch  of  Fate,  through  unforeseen 
contingency,  and  those  decades  immedi- 
ately preceding  the  "Days  of  '76"  saw 
daunting  times  in  New  America.  French 
and  English  interests  were  in  hostile  con- 
test for  the  prized  Ohio  Valley,  and  hot 
friction  arose  between  the  Colonists  who 
severally  knew  these  countries  as  their 
home  lands.  General  dissention  was 
manifested  in  a  rising  resentment  against 
the  injustices  of  British  rule,  national 
crisis  becoming  acute  with  the  historic 
"Stamp  Ace"  of  1765.  A  scant  five  years 
later  witnessed  the  "Boston  Massacre," 
followed  by  the  memorable  "Tea  Party" 
in  1773,  when  the  seething  flames  of 
revolution  burst  forth  in  earnest,  sun- 
dering the  already-weakened  bonds  that 
linked  Great  Britain  with  her  resentful 
offspring. 

No  Time  For  Identification 

A     zealous    citizenr\',     with     previous 
civic  interests  divided  between  the  burn- 


ing of  witches  and  the  "civilizing"  of 
Indians  (who  were  the  only  true  "Amer- 
icans"), found  their  tiny  ant  hill  trod 
by  Destiny,  and  accordingly,  scurried  in 
apprehension,  forgetful  the  while  of  their 
less-pertinent  enterprises.  Thus,  the 
science  of  identification  lapsed  in  the 
New  World.  After  the  Revolution,  the 
period  up  to  1849  brought  many  mo- 
mentous events  that  left  little  time  for 
considering  such  trivialties  as  "personal 
identification." 

But  a  directive  hand  had  once  more 
touched  Time's  winding  scroll,  and  those 
years  following  the  discovery  of  gold  in 
California  found  that  state  dubiously 
populous  with  motley  Argonauts.  Un- 
der the  fleeting  aegis  of  newly  gained 
riches,  hitherto  honest  men  became  flag- 
rant violators  of  human  harmony.  Nor 
was  there  any  dearth  of  professional  evil- 
doers, who  were  lured  by  Fortune's 
flickering  flambeau  from  every  quarter 
of  the  globe.  The  historic  and  western 
portal  of  San  Francisco  sheltered  an  am- 
biguously variegated  assemblage;  mur- 
derous gamblers  from  IVIexico,  Chinese 
highbinder  tong  men,  and  exconvicts 
from  Australian  penal  colonies.  These 
latter  were  especially  dangerous  and 
troublesome,  being  both  "jail  clever"  and 
vicious,  and  were  known  by  a  current 
sobriquet  as  "Sydney  Ducks." 

Acute  Condition 

Enforcement  officials  and  all  peace 
officers  were  confronted  with  an  acute 
condition ;  once  again,  emergency  arose 
to  recall  the  importance  of  personal 
identification  to  the  conscience  of  a  gen- 
eral public  that  heeded  with  the  re- 
actions of  a  fire  singed  though  thrice 
warned  child. 

Together  with  the  renowned  Al- 
phonse  Bertillon,  France  also  gave  the 
world  a  no  less  important,  though  per- 
haps more  humble  contributor  to  the 
identification  field  in  the  French  scient- 
ist, M.  Daguerre,  who,  in  1839,  pub- 
lished the  description  of  a  method  of 
photographic  reproduction,  developed  by 
himself,  which  still  bears  his  name — the 
daguerreotype.  The  process  employed  a 
plate  of  metallic  silver  treated  with 
iodine  fumes  which  converted  its  surface 
into  a  thin  coating  of  silver  iodide.  After 
the  image  had  been  impressed  by  the  ex- 
posure, which  was  necessarily  a  long 
one,  the  plate  was  removed  to  a  dark 
room,  and  treated  with  vapor  of  metallic 
mercury,  which  formed  a  graduated  de- 
posit upon  the  recorded  image,  thus  cre- 
ating   a    "positive"    likeness.     Although 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'   JOURNAL 


Page  17 


the  results  were  practical,  as  still  existent 
specimens  attest,  a  marked  disadvantage 
was  presented  in  the  lengthy  exposures 
required,  a  most  undesirable  factor  in 
criminal  photography.  Yet,  despite  these 
circumstances,  the  daguerreotype  process 
was  another  link  in  the  long  and  varied 
chain  of  evolution  in  identification. 

Criminals  Photographed 

The  adaptation  of  this  facility  to  re- 
quirements in  San  Francisco  was  con- 
ceived by  Capt.  I.  \y.  Lees,  of  the  city 
police  department,  who,  on  December  5, 

1854,  began  having  local  criminals  pho- 
tographed. This  custom  continued  for 
some  years,  with  technical  progress  in 
photographic  science  adding  accumula- 
tive merit  to  the  method.  Eventually, 
the  pictures  were  placed  in  books,  several 
hundred  to  the  \olume,  the  photographs 
being  supplemented  by  criminal  histories 
and  intimate  descriptions  of  the  indi- 
viduals. It  has  been  authoritatively  as- 
serted that  this  custom,  originating  in 
San  Francisco,  later  spread  to  other 
cities  and  many  foreign  countries,  in- 
cluding France,  where  it  was  eagerly  in- 
ducted by  Bertillon  into  his  "synthetic" 
system. 

Throughout  the  succeeding  years,  San 
Francisco  and  all  other  American  cities 
employed  their  various  makeshifts,  await- 
ing, the  while,  some  clear  sighted  discov- 
erer to  retrieve  an  instinctive  endowment 
from  the  primordial.  During  the  year 
1880,  however,  at  least  one  ready  thinker 
in  San  Francisco  had  noted  the  unique 
characteristics  of  his  skin  patterns, 
through  ink-stained  fingers  casually 
pressed  against  a  blotter.  This  was  Mr. 
Isaiah  West  Tabor,  a  photographer 
whose  place  of  business  was  first  located 
in  the  Hibernia  Bank  Building  at  No.  8 
Montgomery  Street,  and  whose  advertis- 
ing offered  the  inviting  advantage  of  an 

elevator. 

Fingerprints  Ignored 

With  this  discovery  of  fingerprints, 
the  dawn  of  understanding  brightened, 
and  Taber  saw  its  radiance.  Further  in- 
vestigation and  research  disclosed  an  in- 
herent benison  of  man's  early  ancestors; 
and  Taber  voiced  his  enthusiasm  to  the 
harried  authorities,  advocating  the  use  of 
fingerprinting  to  supply  the  current 
needs,  and  more  especially  to  identify 
the  immigrant  Chinese,  whose  influx 
could  have  been  much  better  regulated 
with  the  adoption  of  Taber's  suggestions. 
But  Taber's  beacon  of  enlightenment 
was  kindled  in  a  city  of  the  blind,  and 
once  again  "civilized"  men  ignored  a 
time  tested  boon  that  long  since  insured 
the  survival  of  their  prehistoric  forbears. 

Amazing  results  sometimes  develop 
from    unassuming    sources,    as    is    well 


proven  by  the  modest  article  on  skin 
patterns  written  by  Dr.  Henry  Faulds, 
which  appeared  in  "Nature,"  on  Oc- 
tober 28,  1880.  It  would,  of  course,  be 
impossible  to  determine  the  number, 
much  less  the  identity,  of  all  who  may 
have  noted  Dr.  Faulds'  contribution. 
However,  its  effects  are  recognized  by 
the  immediate  and  wide  interest  in  a 
subject  which  had  fallen  into  compara- 
tive obscurity.  It  is  quite  possible  that 
Taber  may  have  read  Dr.  Faulds' 
article;  it  is  certain  that  Sir  Francis 
Galton  found  it  an  inspiration,  as  he 
personally  admitted. 

Thumb  Print 

Shortly  after  the  appearance  of  Faulds' 
technical  outline,  a  government  expedi- 
tion was  engaged  in  a  geological  survev 
in  New  Mexico,  then  a  frontier  terri- 
tory, the  executive  staff  including  Mr. 
Gilbert  Thompson,  who  had  been  an 
engineer  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac. 
Perhaps  Thompson  was  a  subscriber  to 
"Nature."  At  any  rate,  one  of  his  fa- 
vored practices  constitutes  an  important 
event  in  fingerprint  history. 

Thompson's  duties  included  the  issu- 
ing of  salary  vouchers  to  members  of  the 
party ;  and  to  insure  protection  from 
alteration,  he  habitually  impressed  his 
own  thumb-print  over  the  amount  of  the 
check.  One  such  document,  still  on 
record,  was  made  out  to  a  worker  bear- 
ing the  dubiously  suggestive  by  name  of 
"Lying  Bob,"  and  read   as  follows: 

Mr.  Jones,  Sutler,  will  pay  to  Lying 
Bob  seventv-five  dollars. 


Gilbert  Thompson 
U.  S.  G.  S. 


00 


$75,100 

(In   the   original,   Thompson's 

thumb-print  is  stamped   here 

over  the  figures.) 

First  Modern  Prints 

Even  as  introduced,  for  a  precaution 
against  forgery,  this  usage  may  be  the 
first  latter  day  employment  of  finger- 
prints in  the  United  States,  although 
their  earth  recorded  importance  had  been 
long  appreciated,  as  shown  by  the  nu- 
merous and  diversified  prehistoric  indica- 
tions from  Nova  Scotia  to  the  Pacific 
Slope. 

Like  homing  intuition  and  the  many 
other  instinctive  capabilities  of  man's 
early  ancestors,  the  inherent  skill  to  fol- 
low a  spoor  and  to  recognize  the  signifi- 
cance of  skin  patterns  was  submerged  by 
civilization,  but  from  time  to  time  an  as- 
sociation of  ideas  has  reanimated  the 
spark  of  intelligence,  frequently  with  sur- 
prising results. 


The  utilitarian  application  of  finger- 
prints was  suggested  in  1885  by  a  now 
unknown  supporter  in  Cincinnati,  who 
advocated  their  impression  on  railroad 
tickets  as  a  bar  to  misuse.  With  a  density 
that  passes  understanding,  the  idea  was 
summarily  rejected  b\-  transportation  offi- 
cials, on  the  basis  that  "it  might  annoy 
the  passengers" ;  this  attitude  suggests  a 
decisively  biased  discrimination,  in  the 
face  of  such  other  rigorous  and  innumer- 
able discomforts  as  were  inevitable  with 
that  era's  train  service. 

Thumb  Pictures 

Additional  publicity  was  given  in 
1886,  when  Joseph  T.  James  of  Miami 
University,  published  an  article  entitled 
"Thumb  Pictures,"  in  which  he  set  forth 
the  pertinent  fact  that  papillary  designs 
of  the  friction  surfaces  remain  constant 
through  life,  and  differ  with  the  skin  of 
every  human  being.  His  \aluable  treatise 
reads  in  part : 

"The  Chinese  make  use  of  these  facts 
in  the  identification  of  their  major  crim- 
inals, at  least  in  part  of  the  empire.  We 
photograph  our  criminals  ;  they  take  the 
prints  of  their  thumbs.  These  are  col- 
lected in  a  file,  and,  if  the  delinquent 
should  fall  into  the  hands  of  the  police, 
another  print  is  taken  and  serves  as  mate- 
rial for  comparison.  The  Chinese  say 
their  method  is  more  reliable  and  much 
simpler  than  photography,  since  the  crim- 
inal may  make  his  face  unrecognizable 
through  changes  in  wearing  his  hair  or 
beard,  and  other  artificial  means." 

This  illustration  suggests  that  Mr. 
James  had  made  some  investigation  on 
the  subject ;  coming  from  such  an  author- 
itative source,  his  writing  must  have 
awakened  considerable  interest. 

Mark  Twain  Contributes 

Another  fingerprint  milestone  was 
erected  on  the  pathway  of  literature  in 
1893,  by  Mark  Twain,  in  his  classic  de- 
tective story,  "Pudd'nhead  Wilson."  This 
lively  tale  was  heartily  acclaimed,  as 
were  all  of  the  offerings  from  the  facile 
pen  of  that  lovable  literary  giant;  but 
in  this  case,  the  applause  was  tinged  with 
an  undertone  of  skepticism  regarding 
the  plausibility  of  the  chronicle's  pro- 
tagonist, who,  during  his  remarkable  ac- 
tivities, rectified  the  confused  identity  of 
twins,  and  secured  conviction  in  a  homi- 
cide trial,  on  fingerprint  evidence.  An 
ignoble  comment  on  popular  wisdom  and 
a  sad  paradox  was  this,  wherein  modern 
man  derided  the  authenticity  of  that 
which  long  ago  had  aided  indispensably 
in  making  his  very  existence  possible. 

Repeatedly,  fingerprints  had  tendered 
their  time  proven  service  to  solve  the 
many  and  perplexing  problems  of  modern 
(Continued  nn  paar  43) 


Page  18 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


Phone  8-8743 

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STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

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Office:   S-8683    -     Residence:   3-4389 
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STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

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Henry    Bielfeldt 
2520   Pacific   Avenue  Telephone   4-0864 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

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The  Killer's  Cap 

(Continued  from  page  )■) 

Mrs.  Voorhies  found  a  paper  bag  and 
turned  toward  the  rack  which  held  the 
eclairs.  A  change  came  over  the  youth's 
face  as  she  did  so.  The  cruel  corners  of 
his  mouth  curled  downward  in  a  positive 
sneer.  His  eyes  narrowed  to  tiny,  venom- 
ous slits  and  the  trembling  increased.  For 
a  moment  he  stood  poised  behind  her, 
arms  tense,  hands  deep  in  his  overcoat 
pockets.  The  woman  placed  a  pair  of 
eclairs  into  the  bag,  carefully  wrapping 
each  one  separately  in  oiled  paper.  Six 
eclairs  went  into  the  sack,  then  seven. 

The  youth  stiffened.  His  right  hand 
emerged  from  the  pocket  of  the  over- 
coat, white  knuckled  as  it  curled  tightly 
around  a  hickory  stick  which  looked  for 
all  the  world  like  a  policeman's  billy 
club.  He  raised  it  high  above  his  head, 
stretching  on  tiptoe  like  a  tennis  player 
about  to  deliver  a  cannon  ball  serve.  The 
woman  spoke: 

"Will  a  dozen  be  enough,  Charlie?" 

"Plenty."  He  spoke  through  tight, 
tense  lips.  "Just  right." 

The  woman  caught  the  strange,  snarl- 
ing undertone.  She  paused  as  she  reached 
for  the  eighth  eclair.  Then  the  club  came 
smashing  down  in  a  crushing  arc.  The 
woman  slumped  forward  abruptly,  then 
fell  heavily  across  the  top  of  another 
cookie  can,  hands  clutched  close  to  her 
stomach.  A  finger  caught  between  her 
dress  and  the  razor  sharp  edge  of  the  can 
and  was  sheared  of?  abruptly.  She 
screamed  in  agony,  then  tumbled  on,  to 
the  floor. 

For  the  moment  the  youth  stood  star- 
ing at  her,  amazement  mirrored  in  his 
eyes.  She  had  received  that  violent  blow, 
yet  remained  unconscious.  She  was  lying 
on  the  floor  now,  head  facing  the  rear  of 
the  store,  screaming  violently. 

Charlie  ran  to  the  front  door,  turned 
the  key  in  the  lock,  found  the  light 
switch  with  practiced  hands,  then  darted 
back  to  the  woman.  He  stifled  her 
screams  with  his  hands  as  he  dragged 
her  back  to  the  apartment  in  the  rear, 
never  noticing  that  his  cap  fell  to  the 
floor  as  he  did  so.  He  tossed  the  squirm- 
ing, helpless  woman  into  a  chair,  then 
started  to  work  with  his  club  again.  The 
second  blow  stilled  her  screams,  but  he 
hit  her  many  times,  just  to  make  sure. 

When  Mrs.  Voorhies  lay  limp  and 
silent  in  her  chair,  the  youth  worked 
slower  and  with  more  deliberation.  First 
he  found  a  length  of  rope  in  the  rear  of 
the  apartment  and  went  to  work  on  the 
inert  body.  The  line  cut  deep  into  her 
flesh  as  he  tied  first  the  arms  and  then 
the  ankles.  She  fell  to  the  floor  with  a 
resounding  thud. 


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STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


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STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

ERIC  E.  ROSENBERG.  M.D. 

DISEASES   OF  THE   SKIN 

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Distributors   of 
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Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS"  JOURNAL 


Page  19 


THE  GOLD   RUSH   RESTAURANT 

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Warehouse  Co. 

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430  North  Aurora  Street  Phone  2-6502 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


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Telephone   8-891  I 

MANTHEY  BROS. 

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Satisfied  that  his  victim  was  bound  se- 
curely, the  youth  turned  his  attention  to 
the  store.  On  a  high  shelf  at  the  rear  of 
the  store  he  found  what  he  wanted.  Gin- 
gerly he  lifted  the  can  from  its  shelf 
and  brought  it  back  to  a  position  beside 
the  woman.  Next  he  turned  his  attention 
to  the  cash  register.  It  was  almost  empty. 

Wildly  he  rushed  through  the  store 
and  apartment,  searching  for  possible 
hiding  places  for  funds.  He  opened 
drawers  and  closed  them  angrily,  then 
turned  his  attention  to  the  bed  and  couch 
cushions.  They  did  not  surrender  a  soli- 
tary dime.  Mrs.  Voorhies'  purse  was 
equally  empty.  He  dashed  to  the  cigar 
counter  and  stuffed  his  pockets  full  of 
cigars  and  cigarettes.  Then  he  paused, 
staring  silently  at  the  gloomy  shelves 
around  him.  Only  the  street  lights  illum- 
inated the  scene.  He  realized  that  to 
search  for  funds  without  lights  was  a 
futile  task.  To  search  for  them  with 
lights  would  be  fatal.  Too  late  he  real- 
ized that  the  flaw  in  his  plans  lay  there. 
He  would  never  find  Mrs.  Voorhies' 
"Heaps  of  money."  The  youth  shrugged, 
then  turned  his  attention  to  the  task  at 
hand.  He  had  to  destroy  the  evidence. 
And  to  do  that  he  had  to  destroy  Mrs. 
Voorhies.  There  was  no  choice  in  the 
matter. 

After  due  deliberation,  Charlie  re- 
turned to  the  still  form  in  the  living 
room,  picked  up  the  empty  can  he  had 
found,  then  moved  to  a  kerosene  barrel 
at  the  rear  of  the  store.  He  let  the  fluid 
flow  until  the  can  was  brimming  and  the 
volatile  fluid  slopped  over  and  puddled 
on  the  floor.  Then  he  splashed  the  con- 
tents of  the  can  about  the  store. 

One  can,  then  another,  then  a  third. 
Enough  gasoline  to  start  a  roaring  in- 
ferno. The  last  can  he  saved  for  the 
woman  herself,  dousing  her  clothes  with 
it  liberally.  Then  he  tossed  the  container 
aside  and  ignited  a  match.  He  dropped 
it  to  the  floor.  Within  a  matter  of  sec- 
onds the  place  was  a  furnace  from  hades. 
Flames  licked  across  the  floor  and  up  the 
walls  and  shelves.  1  hey  darted  toward 
the  feet  of  the  arsonist,  then  retreated. 
He  moved  toward  the  door,  sure  his 
task  was  completed.  .As  he  did  the  flames 
reached  the  prostrate  woman  and  ignited 
her  clothing. 

The  first  scream  stopped  him  dead  in 
his  tracks.  He  was  free  of  the  fire  now. 
It  was  not  burning  in  the  front  of  the 
store,  would  not  for  a  while.  A  second 
scream  ripped  through  the  oven  hot  air, 
shriller,  more  piercing  than  the  fist  one. 
Charlie  gazed  at  the  street,  then  back  at 
the  woman.  Flames  licked  dangerously 
close  to  the  doorway. 


Telephone    5-5689 

ERNEST  C.  GRINlR,  M.D. 

405  Medico-Dental   Building 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


San  Joaquin  Laundry  Association 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


LIDO  CLUB 

111  NORTH  WILSON  WAY 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Hobbs-Parsons  Company 

Wholesale  Produce 


FRESNO 


STOCKTON 


NOBLE  HOTEL 

Reasonable  Daily  and  Weekly  Rates 
19  No.  Sutter  Phone  2-9094 

PACIFIC  HOTEL 

234  East   Market   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Jack  Candreva,  Residence  Telephone  3-7532 
Bill  I  vers.  Residence  Telephone  4-1050 

IVERS  VAN  AND  STORAGE 

LOCAL  AND  LONG  DISTANCE  MOVING 

Telephone  2-4279 

91 S  EAST  MARKET  STREET 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Jack's  Washing  Machine  Service 

Factory  Authorized   Sales   and  Service 

Maytag,  Whirlpool  Automatic,   General 

Electric,  A.  B.  C,  Blackstone. 

Parts  and   Repairs   for  All  Makes 

Thirty  Years   in   the   Washer   Business 

148  So.  California  Street  Phone  3-2465 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  5-0265 


Maurice  D.  Soares,  Pres. 


CHAPEL  OF  THE  PALMS 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 

202   S.   California   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Page  20 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


RICHARDS  HOTEL 

Alice  Richards,  Manager 

1  South  El  Dorado  Street         Phone  6-6440 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Colonial   Ice  Cream  Company 

WHOLESALE      •      RETAIL 


145  W.  Channel  Street 

STOCKTON 


Telephone  2-1429 

CALIFORNIA 


W.  E.  McGILLVRAY 
Wholesa/e  Produce 

41    North    Hunter  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MARK  TWAIN   HOTEL 

CLEAN  .   .  .  COMFORTABLE 


426   Market   Street 

STOCKTON 


Phone   8-8981 

CALIFORNIA 


BENJAMIN  WINICK.  M.D. 


HELEN'S  DONUT  SHOP 

— Wholesale    -    Retail 
COMPLETE   FOUNTAIN  SERVICE 
SPECIAL  ORDERS  FOR  PARTIES 


125  N.   Californ   iaStreet 
STOCKTON 


Phone  4-3611 

CALIFORNIA 


CHAS.   F.  RICH 

H.  P.  FISHER  TILE  AND  MARBLE  CO. 
AND  STOCKTON  TILE  COMPANY 


4780  E.  Fremont   Street 
STOCKTON 


Phone  3-0636 

CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-9816 


Licensed  -   Bonded 


HENRY  BAUMGARTNER 

FARM  LABOR  CONTRACTOR 
WORK  GUARANTEED 

Residence:    1964  East  Eighth  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


He  should  run.  But  he  couldn't  take 
a  chance  on  that  screaming.  She  was 
yelling  loud  enough  to  wake  the  dead.  A 
phrase  slipped  into  his  mind.  She  was 
yelling  bloody  murder.  That  was  it. 
Bloody  murder.  How  often  had  he  heard 
the  phrase  as  a  child.  It  had  to  stop.  Half 
the  town  would  be  here  any  minute.. 

The  youth  darted  back  into  the  blaz- 
ing rear  apartment.  It  took  only  a  split 
second  to  orient  himself  in  spite  of  the 
smoke  and  flames,  to  find  the  blazing 
body  of  the  woman  and  drag  her,  still 
shrieking  for  mercy,  to  the  bathroom. 


Charles  Simpson 

For  a  moment  he  considered  attempt- 
ing to  put  out  the  fire.  To  douse  the 
Hames  and  try  to  save  the  woman's  life. 
But  he  could  not.  As  she  lay,  still 
screaming,  on  the  tile  floor  beneath  him, 
he  weighed  the  odds.  As  long  as  she  lived 
there  were  no  odds.  She  would  identify 
him  immediately.  And  he  would  live  for 
a  long  time  behind  bars.  The  hickory 
club  came  out  of  the  overcoat  pocket  and 
went  into  action  a  third  time.  The 
screaming  stopped  abruptly. 

The  youth  turned.  The  delay  could 
have  been  fatal.  Already  the  living  room 
of  the  apartment  was  a  wall  of  flames. 
Another  section  of  the  blaze  burned 
brightly  in  the  front  of  the  store.  Char- 
lie held  his  hand  over  his  mouth  and 
darted  through  the  furnace.  Orange 
tongues  of  flame  darted  toward  him  like 
angry  snakes.  His  feet  felt  baked  within 
his  shoes.  He  stumbled,  staggered  a  little, 
then  made  it  to  the  door.  The  fire  was 
was  getting  closer.  Any  minute  now 
someone  would  see  it  and  turn  in  an 
alarm.    He  had  to  get  out. 


OTTO  ALLGOEWER 

FARM  LABOR  CONTRACTOR 


22   South   Monroe  Street 

STOCKTON 


Phone   2-3129 

CALIFORNIA 


Mor-Pak  Preserving  Corporation 

Packers  of  the  Famous 
AUNT  MARY'S  ELBERTA   PEACHES 

FANCY  KADOTA  FIGS 
FANCY  WHOLE  PEELED  APRICOTS 


P.  O.  BOX  391 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


Delta   Distributing  Company 

LUCKY  LAGER 
"It's  Lucky  When  You  Live  in  California" 

1041    West  Weber  Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Day  Phone   2-5273  Nile   Phone   3-4568 

BLINCOE  TRUCKING  CO. 

F.    E.    Blincoe.    Jr. 
"SERVICE  AT  ITS   BEST" 

2431    Mariposa    Road 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-92  19 


Otto  and  Belle  White 


MOTHERS  MODERN   HOTEL 

CONVENIENT      •      COMFORTABLE 
REASONABLE 

1446   Mariposa    Road 

One-Half  Mile  South  on  Highway  99 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Office  Phone  4-771  I 


Res,  Phone  4-4935 


RALPH   PANELLA  •  Trucking 

2150   East    Fremont   Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

WATERFRONT  INN 

E.   J.  Cuneo 
MIXED     DRINKS 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL  SHERMAN 

Wm.  and  Marie  Murray 

32  So.   Sutter   Street  Telephone  8-8501 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  21 


Phone  3   4435  Evening  Phone  2-6704 

LEROY  A.  WASHBURN 

REAL   ESATE 
INSURANCE      -      NOTARY      -      TAX   SERVICE 

628   East   Main  Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  4-0260 


Res.   Phone  4-6027 


Cochella,   Henning  &   Dunn 

GENERAL  INSURANCE 

Bank   of  America   Building 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-6881 


Phone  3-8116 


COSTA      BROS. 

Growers   and  Shippers 
FRUITS  AND   VEGETABLES 

OfBce:   Union  and  Lafayette  Streets 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


CHANSLOR  &   LYON   CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE  PARTS  AND  EQUIPMENT 

421   North  Hunter  Phone  Stockton  9-9011 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  4-2582  or  8-8377 

JACK  HANNA  -  Music  Studio 

PIANIST       •       TEACHER       •       BANDLEADER 

24   South   California   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Dial  5-0296 


Jesse  J.  Inman 

INMAN'S     INC. 

REALTORS,   INSURANCE.   LOANS,   NOTARY 

Agents    for 

BEAUTIFUL   PACIFIC  GARDENS 

307   East   Weber  Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Garrow  and   Bowman 

REAL  ESTATE   AND   INSURANCE 
Save  on  Your  Insurance 
...  See  TED   BUNN  .  .  . 


632  North  Carolina 
STOCKTON 


Telephone   8-8671 

CALIFORNIA 


ATA  TIRE  SERVICE 

TIRES   -   CUSTOM  RECAPPING  -  BATTERIES 

ACCESSORIES     -     SEAT  COVERS 

"Our  Treads  Are  Miles  Ahead" 


170S  So.  EI  Dorado 

STOCKTON 


Dial  4-4578 

CALIFORNIA 


Fumbling,  ilespciatf  now,  he  searched 
for  the  lock.  It  had  been  so  easy  to  find. 
Now  it  seemed  impossible.  Sweat 
streamed  down  his  face  as  he  groped 
with  sweaty  palms.  Ten  seconds.  Thirty 
seconds.  It  seemed  like  thirt\-  centuries. 
He  was  near  collapse  when  his  hand 
finally  closed  over  the  key.  And  as  he 
opened  the  door  and  darted  out  into  the 
fog-swept  night  he  heard  the  screaming 
start  again  behind  him.  Charlie  glanced 
up  and  down  the  street !  There  was  no 
one  in  sight.  No  one  had  heard  the 
screams  or  seen  the  fire  yet.  She  would 
just  ha\e  to  go  ahead  and  scream.  Let 
her  burn  to  death.  He  had  tried  to  finish 
her.  He  pulled  the  door  closed  behind 
him  and  dashed  off  into  the  gloom.  'The 
important  thing  was  to  get  away  now. 
He  could  not  afford  to  be  seen  near  the 
store  when  someone  turned  in  the  fire 
alarm. 

The  killer  ran  two  blocks  along 
Forty-eighth  Avenue  before  he  slowed  to 
a  walk.  Satisfied  at  last  that  he  was  in 
the  clear  he  moved  more  slowly,  waiting 
to  catch  his  breath.  It  had  been  easy. 
And  still  no  fire  alarm.  He  wondered 
when  someone  would  see  the  fire. 

In  the  distance  he  could  see  the  num- 
ber seven  streetcar  approaching.  He 
waited  for  it  in  the  safety  zone.  It  was 
just  what  he  needed.  The  streetcar 
would  turn  up  Irving  Street  and  run 
east,  toward  his  home.  He  could  get  off 
a  block  from  his  house.  ^Vhile  he  waited, 
he  mopped  the  grime  and  perspiration 
from  his  face.  A  moment  later  the  lum- 
bering steel  giant  slowed,  its  brakes 
squealed,  and  it  came  to  a  stop.  He 
dropped  the  right  change  into  a  coin  box 
and  pushed  quickly  past  the  conductor 
to  a  seat  in  the  rear. 

The  lights  were  brilliant  after  the 
darkness.  Bright,  glaring  and  white.  'Too 
brilliant.  He  glanced  at  his  overcoat.  It 
was  splashed  with  blood  from  top  to 
bottom.  He  scrounged  down  in  his  seat 
and  tried  to  look  inconspicuous.  It  was 
not  easy  to  do  in  that  light,  even  if  the 
car  was  almost  empt)'.  'That  was  the 
trouble.  There  were  one  or  two  other 
people  in  his  section.  Only  one  or  two. 
A  woman  had  her  back  to  him  and 
seemed  to  be  minding  her  own  business. 
But  the  man,  sitting  sideways  and  read- 
ing the  newspaper  was  different.  Every 
now  and  then  the  killer  was  sure  he 
glanced  at  him.  Once  he  looked  at  him 
for  a  long  time.  A  deep,  penetrating 
stare.  Trying  to  make  some  sense  out 
of  the  blood.  Charlie  was  sure  of  that. 
And  he  knew  people  remember  things 
like  blood.  The  red  fluid  makes  an  im- 
pression. 


Phone   2-4855 

HESCO  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

Frank   Carpino 

MANUFACTURERS   -   ENGINEERS 

TOOL  AND   DIE   MAKERS   -   MACHINISTS 

METAL  STAMPING 

2020   Stewart   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Stockton  Electric  Motor  Repair 

MOTOR  REWINDING  AND   REPAIRS 

1324   East    Miner    Avenue  Telephone    4-4913 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone   8-8541 


P..   O.   Box    1289 


L.   F.  GRIMSLEY,   Inc. 

944   East   Scotts   Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-0593  Residence   4-5731 

Sinox  and   Di-Nitro  Distributor 

Valor    Brand 

Dusting   Sulphurs     -     Wettable   Sulphurs 

Insecticides     -     Spray   Materials 

FLOYD   BROOKS 

P.  O.  Box  1362         Weber  Ave.  at  Commerce 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


S.  M.  McGAW  CO. 

CONTRACTORS 

307   Elks    Building 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


DICK'S  DRIVE  INN 

1301    Harding   Way  Phone  2-9540 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

99    MARKET 

MEATS,  CaiOCERlES  AND  VEGETABLES 

2031    McKinley   Ave.  Phone   2-4763 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

HOME  WIRING  CO. 

CONTRACTORS 

615  W.  Fremont  Street  Phone  3-0262 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Page  22 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


ART  PEHL  -  Signs 

A  COMPLETE  SIGN   SERVICE 
TRUCK  PAINTING 


1616   Cherokee   Lane 

STOCKTON 


Telephone  7-7652 

CALIFORNIA 


9UALITY  DISTRIBUTING  CO. 

Distributor   of   Franzi   Wines 
BLATZ     BEER 

Phone  2-4293 

CALIFORNIA 


31   South  Aurora  Street 
STOCKTON 


ETS-HOKIN  &  GALVAN 

ELECTRICIANS 

Fire   Prevention   Equipment 

Westinghouse   Appliances 

233  No.  San  Joaquin  St.  Telephone  5-SS21 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


DR.  E.  G.  HERMOSILLO 


ASHLEY  C.  MEHRTEN 

Designing   -   Machine   Work   -   Welding   -   Repair 
Work  -  Builder  of  Farm  Machinery 


411   So.  Aurora  St. 

STOCKTON 


Telephone  4-7613 

CALIFORNIA 


ELLIS  GARAGE 

Trucks  -  Tractors  -  Automobiles  .  .    All  Types 

Dayton  Tires  -  For  Complete  Motor  Service, 

Telephone   4-4909 

New  Address:  2226  North  Wilson  Way 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


FORTY -NINE  DRUG  CO. 

Charles   P.    Michelotti 

901  N  Yosemite  St.,  Cor.  Poplar       Phone  2-5143 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

DEAN'S  MARKET 


2301    East  Vine 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9738 

CALIFORNIA 


EMIL'S 


Fur  Shoppe 


Fine  Furs  -  Designing  and  Remodeling 
1247   North   Monroe  Street  Phone   3-0533 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

QUALITY  UPHOLSTERING 

By   Chas.    Berluccelli 
Recovering     •     Repairing     •     Restyling 
6231/,  W.  Fremont  Phone  3-9S64 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone:   4-3438       TWX:   SK  28-X 

Friedman  Bag  Company,  inc. 

Manufacturers   and  Importers 
Burlap  Bags    -    Twine    -    Cotton  Bags 

130    W.    Channel   St.  Stockton,   Calif. 

Lodi    Plant:    412    S    Sacramento    St.,    Phone    640 
Stockton    Plant:    Charier  Way   at    W.    P   .Tracks 

Ed.  Spiekerman  Concrete  Pipe  Co. 

Stockton    Office:    P.    O.    Box   534;    Phone   4-4052 

LODI  CALIFORNIA 

Bus.  Telephone  2-0494  Res.  Telephone  3-013  1 

Refrigeration   Specialty  Service 

Kelvinator  Refrigerators,  Electric  Ranges,  Coils, 

Parts,  Air  Conditioning,  Condensing  Units,  Home 

Freezers,   Display   Cases,  Walk-In    Boxes. 

13  38   -    1340  E  Miner  Ave.  Stockton,   Calif. 

Phone  2-7340 

BROUWER  MOTOR  CO. 

NEW  AND   USED  CARS 
520  No.  EI  Dorado  St.      John  J.  Brouwer,  Owner 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Night  Phone  4-4254 


Of  course  the  man  with  the  newspaper 
was  wearing  glasses  with  extra  heavy 
lenses.  Probably  he  could  not  see  very 
far.  Or  could  he?  Maybe  he  was  a  de- 
tective. Sometimes  detectives  wore  dis- 
guises. Charlie  had  read  about  that.  By 
the  time  the  car  turned  off  on  Lincoln 
Avenue  it  seemed  that  the  man  was  do- 
ing nothing  but  look  at  him.  But  how 
could  he  have  found  out  so  fast? 

The  killer  did  not  wait  to  find  out. 
He  dropped  ofE  the  car  and  dashed  across 
the  broad  street  to  Golden  Gate  Park. 
He  had  to  get  rid  of  the  overcoat.  Bury 
it.  That  was  what  he  had  to  do.  Bury  it. 
No  one  would  think  of  looking  in  the 
park. 

He  found  some  soft,  freshly  turned 
earth  and  scrabbled  at  it  with  his  fingers. 
Before  long  he  had  excavated  a  broad, 
shallow  hole.  He  fumbled  in  the  over- 
coat pockets  to  make  sure  they  were 
empty.  There  was  nothing  there  but  the 
club.  He  left  that  in  the  pocket  and 
folded  the  coat  neatly  before  placing  it 
in  the  hole.  Then  he  reached  for  his  cap. 
His  groping  fingers  touched  his  fog 
dampened  hair. 

The  cap !  He  remembered  then.  He 
had  not  thought  about  it  when  it  drop- 
ped to  the  floor  of  the  store.  At  the  mo- 
ment he  had  been  too  busy  dragging  his 
victim  into  the  rooms  at  the  rear.  Now 
it  was  too  late.  They  would  find  the 
cap  and  get  him.  That  was  all  they 
needed.  Just  one  small  clue.  The  cops 
were  smart.  It  was  enough. 

For  a  moment  he  knelt,  trembling  in 
the  darkness.  The  game  was  up.  It  was 
too  late  to  go  back  and  get  it.  Much  too 
late.  By  now  a  crowd  would  have  gath- 
ered and  the  flames  would  have  con- 
sumed the  entire  store.  No  fire  depart- 
ment could  arrive  in  time  to  put  out  the 
blaze  Charlie  had  started. 

Suddenly  the  youth  grinned.  His  tense 
body  relaxed.  The  fire!  Of  course.  He 
should  have  thought  of  that  sooner.  By 
now  the  cap  was  a  charred  cinder  in  a 
building  full  of  them.  There  was  no  evi- 
dence. None  at  all.  Not  in  the  building, 
anyway.  Only  the  overcoat.  And  it 
would  be  safe  in  the  park.  He  pulled  the 
earth  over  it,  tamped  it  down,  then  fur- 
rowed it  a  little  so  that  it  would  look 
like  the  cultivated  ground  around  it.  A 
moment  later  he  was  walking  up  Lincoln 
Street  without  a  care  in  the  world.  He 
was  in  the  clear.  It  had  been  a  cinch. 
He  felt  like  whistling.  In  fact  he  would 
have  if  he  had  not  been  afraid  of  draw- 
ing attention  to  himself.  As  it  was  no 
one  noticed  him  as  he  proceeded  home- 
ward. 


YOUR       MARKET 

For  Top   Quality  Groceries 
Meats    -     Vegetables    -    Liquors 

Visit   Our  Adjoining   Variety   Store 
1255  Buena  Vista  Phone  9-9143 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


COOL  CORNER 

AS  THE   NAME   IMPLIES 
703  South  Center  Street  Phone  2-9426 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

HOLLYWOOD  HOTEL 

ROOMS   .   .  .  DAY,  WEEK,  MONTH 
106  East   Main  Phone  2-9803 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

NEW  CAVOUR  HOTEL 

Tony   Banchero 

3  06   South  Union  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

L.  R.  Cramer.  Mgr.  Established   1919 

CRAMER  COLLECTION  SERVICE 

Bonded  and  Licensed  -  Collections  and  Adjust- 
ments Made  Everywhere  -  Cash  for  Old  Accounts 
Rm.  318,  Bank  of  America  Bldg.      Phone  2-8308 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Bus.   Phone  3-3773  Res.   Phone  9-9918 

Port  Stockton  Super  Service 

COMPLETE  AUTOMOTIVE   SERVICE 

Personalized  Sales  and  Service 

Used  Cars  and  Trucks 

502  W.  Washington  St.  Stockton,  Calif. 


MAXWELL  M.  WILLENS 
DONALD  D.  BOSCOE 

THE  MASSEY- HARRIS  CO. 

314  South  Aurora 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

POMEROY  SINNOCK 

CONTRACTOR 
147  West  Scotts  Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

ANNIE'S  INN 

BEER  AND  SOFT  DRINKS 
2539   East   Main  Phone   2-9388 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  4-8348  Res.   Phone  2-1609 

FREEWAY  AUTO  SUPPLY 

Auto  Parts  and  Accessories 

Ernie    Viviano 


819   N.  Wilson  Way 


Stockton.  Calif. 


FRED  GRILLO  -  Grocer 

GROCERY  AND  VEGETABLE   MARKET 
Jackson  and  Center  Street  Phone  2-6353 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

ERA  M.  CASSIDY.  D.B.A. 
WM.  H.  CASSIDY 


Real  Estate  and  Insurance 

26   South  California   Street 


Phone  2-5717 

Stockton,   Calif. 


DON'S  REPAIR  SHOP 

Clocks    -    Jewelry    -    Watch   Repairing^ 
and   Ronson   Lighter  Repairs 

921  East  Main  Street  Phone  2-7878 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  23 


FERRETTI'S  FINE  GOODS 


232    East    Main   Street 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


WATT  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE 

Tune-Up    -    Headlights    Adjusted    -    Expert    Car- 
buretor   Work    -    Starters    -    Generators    -    Fuel 
Pump    Distributors 
223S  S.  Monroe  Phone  2-4171 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


LANE'S  MARKET 

1807  East  Eighth  Street  Phone  3-8407 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Compliments   of 

DR.  J.  K.  SKIVINGTON 

California   Buidting 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

J.  FOTIS 

Ladies   and  Gentlemen  Merchant  Tailoring 
Alterations 


146  N.  California  Street 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-3356 

CALIFORNIA 


Phone  5-5691 


John   Immel 


IMMEL  MOTOR  PARTS  CO. 

130  East   Miner   Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  3-1864  Jack  Hansen,   Prop. 

"At  the  Toll  House  Service  Station" 

JACK'S  TIRE  SERVICE 

VULCANIZING   -    RETREADING 


445    North  Wilson  Way 


Stockton.   Calif. 


Leota  Nickerson  Al   Fagnant 

BEST  CLEANERS 

70S  East  Main  Street  Phone  3-21S2 

COUNTRY  CLUB  CLEANERS 

1900  Country  Club  Blvd.  Phone  6-6375 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

CLAUD'S  SERVICE 

General  Repair    -    All  Makes    -    Models 
5333  E.  Washington  Street  Phone  8-8853 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MALLET  T'S 

ELECTRICAL  APPLIANCES 
RADIOS   -    RANGES 


316  Hast  Weber 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-6767 

CALIFORNIA 


BRUNS  &  WIGLEY 

Manufacturing  Jeweler    -    Diamond  Setters 

Phone   4-0241 
514  Stockton  Savings  and  Loan  Bank  Bldg. 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

SOLINA  GROCERY 

Groceries     -     Fruits     -     Vegetables 
Cold  and  Fresh  Meats 


1303  W.  Sonora  Street 

STOCKTON 


Phone  9-9942 

CALIFORNIA 


AMARALLA'S  MARKET 

2702   East   Weber  Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


DR.  WARREN  T.  McNEIL 

242   Sutter  Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


The  killer  walked  all  the  way  home. 
It  was  nine-thirty  when  he  got  there. 
The  house  was  dark.  Charlie  breathed  a 
sigh  of  relief.  He  did  not  want  to  see 
his  folks  that  night.  He  moved  up  the 
front  stairs  soundlessly  and  found  his 
way  to  his  room.  It  was  then  he  noticed 
the  crimson  spots  on  his  light  coloreil 
trousers. 

Blood  !  rhen  there  was  other  evidence. 
He  had  to  get  rid  of  it.  Quickly  he  re- 
moved the  slacks.  Then  he  noticed  his 
socks.  They  too  were  bloodstained.  Care- 
fully he  inspected  his  coat  and  shirt.  The 
overcoat  had  protected  them.  Both  were 
as  spotless  as  they  had  been  when  he 
left  early  in  the  evening.  He  donned  a 
dressing  gown  and  descended  to  the 
kitchen. 

The  house  was  dead  still.  Almost  any- 
way. In  the  distance  the  youth  could 
hear  the  sound  of  his  father's  muted 
snoring.  That  was  all.  There  would  be 
no  trouble.  A  trash  burner  was  attached 
to  the  kitchen  range.  It  would  ser\e  his 
purpose  well.  He  stufiPed  the  bloody 
trousers  into  it  and  followed  them  with 
the  socks.  They  burned  quickly  when  he 
touched  a  match  to  them.  A  couple  of 
times  he  lifted  the  stove  lid  and  prodded 
the  burning  cloth  to  make  sure  the  job 
was  complete.  By  the  time  he  finished 
not  a  shred  of  evidence  remained.  He 
wished  it  had  been  possible  to  bring  the 
overcoat  and  club  home  and  burn  them 
too.  But  someone  would  have  spotted  the 
blood  for  sure.  And  they  were  safe  in 
the  park.  After  all,  what  if  someone  did 
find  them?  They  could  not  possibly  con- 
nect them  with  the  murder.  Or  with  him 
for  that  matter.  There  were  no  identify- 
ing marks. 

The  killer  retraced  his  steps  to  his 
room  and  counted  his  loot.  Three  dol- 
lars. Just  three  dollars.  He  sighed.  It 
was  hardly  the  fortune  he  had  expected 
to  find.  But  at  least  it  was  enough  to 
take  his  girl  friend  to  a  movie.  The 
thought  cheered  him.  After  all,  that  was 
the  whole  idea.  And  he  would  get  more 
money  somehow-. 

He  did  not  bother  to  subtract  the  eve- 
ning's losses.  On  the  credit  side  of  the 
ledger  he  had  three  dollars.  On  the  debit 
side  was  one  gray  overcoat,  one  pair  of 
trousers,  a  pair  of  socks,  and  a  cap.  And 
the  club  of  course.  A  meticulous  book- 
keeper would  add  the  club  into  the 
losses.  But  Charlie  was  not  a  meticulous 
bookkeeper.  He  was  satisfied  with  three 
dollars. 

It  was  hard  to  tell  the  smoke  from  the 
fog  the  next  morning.  Several  people 
passed  the  little  store  at  1515  Forty- 
eighth  Avenue  before  one  of  them  real- 


L.  &   L.  CLUB 

Ray   A.    Oil 
3328  East  Fremont  Phone  2-9781 

STOCKTON  CALIFOR>.IA 


Bascou  Red  Cherry  Bakery 


522  East  Weber  Avenue 

STOCKTON 


Telephone  2-6848 

CALIFORNIA 


Phon.-    3-2172  Res.    Phone   2539) 

California   Fireproof  Storage  and 
Transfer  Co. 

Connplete  Warehousing   Distribution 

H.   F.   Reilley.   Mgr. 
721    North  Union  Street  Stockton.  California 

WOLF  DRUG  CO. 

FOUNTAIN      •      PRESCRIPTIONS 
COSMETICS      •      SUNDRIES 


50  So.  Sutter  St.  at  Market 

STOCKTON 


Phone  4-2555 

CALIFOP 


NAD  MALCOLM 

Groceries      •      Meats      •      Vegetables 

Eighth    and    B 

MARKET — 2201    South   B  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFOR- 

FARMERS  FEED  CO. 

PURINA   CHOWS 


Phone    6-6559 

STOCKTON 


1302    East    Miner   Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 


Dr.   Nelson  Conover,  Denfisf 

Phone   9-9893 
2319  Pacific   Avenue.   On  The  Miracle  Mile 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Residence  88194 


Office  Phone  2-7213 


Dr.  James   H.  Petray 

California    Building 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


Leonard  Torlai.   Prop.  Best  Service 

DROP  IN  CLUB 

WINES   -   LIQUOR   -   BEER   -    SHORT   ORDERS 
39  -  43  S.  Eldorado  Street  Phone  2-9480 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Dr.  U.  S.   IVES  -  Opfomefrisf 

Office   Hours:    9:00    to   5:00 
Saturday:    9:00    to    12:00 

345    North    Sutter    Street  Phone    2-5119 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

GIANNINI  MARKET 

GROCERIES     -     PICNIC   SUPPLIES 
Beer  and  Wine 

1103  East  Harding  Way  Phone  2-91SS 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


X  RAY 


Phone    2-8363 


D.  A.  L.  Greenberg  -  Dentisf 

7     South     EI     Dorado     Street,     Comer     of     Main 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MARION  M.  GREEN.  M.D. 

PHYSICIAN   AND   SURGEON 

Telephone:   Office  3-4512;   Residence  3-7682 

Suite    1107   Medico-Dental   Bldg. 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Art's  Cleaners  and  Dyers 

LAUNDRY  AGENCY 

Open   All    Day   Saturday 

2714  Waterloo  Road  Phone  2-3465 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Page  24 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


ALPINE  PACKING  CO. 

SAUSAGE  MANUFACTURERS 

Joe   Kaeslin,  Prop. 

901   East  Miner  Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

MISSOURI  CLUB 

MIXED   DRINKS      •       HOME-COOKED  MEALS 
22  South  El  Dorado  Street         Phone  2-9428 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

JIM  CASCIARO'S  MARKET 

WINE      •      BEER      •      GROCERIES 
1823  North  California 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


Fred  J.  Conzelman,  M.D. 

Neuropsychiatry   Specialist  Certified   by   Ameri- 
can Board  of  Psychiatry  and  Neurology  ...  By 
Appointment   Only. 
2S10  North  Hunter  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNI/^ 


ACME  AUTO  WRECKING  CO. 

324  South  Center  Street 

CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  7-7021 

STOCKTON 


HOTEL  WHITE 


Hot  and  Cold  Water  .  .  .  Reasonable  Rates 
Phone  2-9746  307  South  Center  Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORM 

ROLAND  C.  DONEUX 

GRAIN    -    BEANS    -    RICE 

Phone  8-8603  P.  O.   Box  469 

18  West  Weber  Street  Stockton,  California 

Farmers'  Implement  Exchange 

Used  Farm  Machinery  Bought,  Sold,  Exchanged 

We    Also    Sell    on    Commission    -    Used    Tractor 

Parts 

Phone  2-4272  P.  O.  Box  1202 

760    W.    Charter   Way  Stockton.    California 

C.   A.   Lease.   Mgr.  P.  O.   Box    I  169 

STOCKTON   ROOFING  CO. 

ESTABLISHED    1912 
Phone    4-989S  736    North    Hunter    Stree' 

STOCKTON  CALIFO-^- 

Office  Phone  2-4844  Res  Phone   7-7343 

FRANK  VACCAREZZA 

FRANK'S   PLUMBING   SHOP 
2558   East   Main   Street 

STOCKTON   46  CALIFORNIA 

E.  C.  Coleman — Res.   2-7813 

W.   C.    Holmes — Res.    2    3  72  7 

COLEMAN   BRAKE  SERVICE 

American    Brake    Blok      -      B-K    Vacuum    Power 
Brakes    -    Wheel  and  Axle  Aligning    -    Lockh-* 
Hvdraulic    Parts. 

I   E.  Miner  .Ave.      Phone  3-1756     Stockton,  Calif. 


DR.  JOHN   ECCLESTON 

STOCKTON  CALIFOR^'■ 

Phone  2-443  1  Hours    10.12   a.m.,    1-6   p.m. 

CHIROPRACTIC   FOR    HEALTH 

Dr.  C.  E.  Bramwell  and 
Dr.  J.  R.  Truscott 

CHIROPRACTOR       •       X-RAY 

1348  North   Center  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


NATALIE  G.  BRUNETTA.  M.D. 


ized  that  a  fire  was  smouldering  inside. 
He  called  the  fire  department  immedi- 
ately. 

It  only  took  a  few  moments  to  extin- 
guish the  slowly  burning  blaze.  And  it 
was  not  long  after  that  when  the  batal- 
lion  chief  in  charge  called  police  head- 
quarters. 

"You  had  better  send  someone  out  to 
1515  Forty-eighth  Avenue,"  he  declared. 
"We  have  a  fire  out  here  which  was  un- 
doubtedly arson  .  .  .  and  the  body  of  a 
woman  who  must  have  been  murdered 
before  the  fire  started." 

A  half  hour  later  Inspector  Allen  Mc- 
Ginn of  the  homicide  detail  was  on  the 
scene  together  with  Inspector  Harry 
Husted  and  Assistant  Inspector  George 
Engler.  The  fireman  led  them  through 
the  scene,  explaining  his  theory  as  he 
went. 

"The  fire  had  to  start  out  here  in  the 
living  room,"  he  declared.  "You  can  see 
by  the  pattern  of  the  flames  that  it  was 
saturated  with  some  volatile  fluid.  The 
woman's  clothes  must  have  been  too.  She 
was  lying  right  there."  He  pointed  to  a 
place  on  the  floor  where  the  flames  had 
burned  through  to  the  basement.  "The 
fire  is  more  concentrated  there  than  any- 
where else.  But  for  some  reason  the  per- 
son who  set  the  fire  picked  her  up  and 
carried  her  into  the  bathroom.  And  aside 
from  her  body,  not  a  thing  in  the  bath- 
room is  burned.  If  you  look  at  the  body 
you  will  see  that  she  took  an  awful  beat- 
ing about  the  head.  No  one  could  have 
done  that  after  the  fire  started."  The 
chief  paused  until  he  found  a  mediimi 
sized  can.  "There  is  the  thing  the  fluid 
was  carried  in.  The  arsonist  must  have 
carried  in  several  loads  to  do  this  much 
damage.  There  is  some  kerosene  up  in 
the  store.  I  figure  that  is  what  the  killer 
used.  The  fire  burned  out  for  the  most 
part  last  night." 

McGinn  looked  at  the  fire  official  in 
amazement. 

"If  this  much  damage  was  done,  why 
didn't  someone  turn  in  an  alarm?"  he 
innuired. 

The  chief  shrugged.  "Probably  be- 
cause no  one  saw  it." 

"Then  why  didn't  the  building  burn 
down  ?" 

"That's  where  the  killer  made  his  big- 
gest mistake.  The  building  did  not  burn 
down  for  the  same  reason  that  some 
chemicals  are  used  to  extinguish  small 
blazes.  In  fact  for  the  same  reason  water 
is  used.  A  fire  has  to  have  air.  If  there 
is  no  air,  it  will  smother  itself.  It  was 
cold  last  night.  Every  window  and  door 
in  this  placed  was  closed  when  we  ar- 
rived.   Actually  all  that  was  left  of  the 


Telephone   Stockton    259 

Pioneer  Tamale  Factory 

p.  and  J.  Costanza,  Prop. 

19   North  California   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  5-5927  Long  Distance  8-6466 

Night   Phone   2-1452 

FOREST  L.  BOYER 

Broker   and    Distributor 
CALIFORNIA  FRUITS  AND  VEGETABLES 

4  19  American  Trust  Bldg.  Stockton,  Calif. 

John  Bevanda  N.  Bulum 

M.  J.  B.  Construction  Co. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

Yard   and  Asphalt  Plant,  South   McKinley   Ave. 

322  Elks  Building  Telephone  2-1520 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MANDARIN   MARKET 

Wholesale  and  Retail  .  .  .  Meat  -  Fruit  -  Grocer- 
ies -  Seafood  -  Vegetables  -  Beer  -  Wine 
Meat — Phone  2-2502      Groceries — Phone  3-5615 

139   South   Center  Street 
STOCKTON       CALIFORNIA 

BUD'S  LIQUOR  STORE 

Choice  Wine,  Beer,  Liquor — Free  Delivery 
Fresh  and  Frozen  Fish  Bait    -    Fishing  Supplies 
Candy    -    Ice  Cream    -    News  Stand    -    Notions 
Sundries  1134  West  Washington  Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORN'/' 

Telephone   9-9228 

SIMPSON  JEWELRY  CO. 

324   East    Main   Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DR.  JOHN   F.  BLINN 
DR.  JOHN   F.  BLINN.  Jr. 

Medico-Dental   Building 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


LACOSTA  HOTEL 


41    South   Hunter 

STOCKTON 


Phone  7-7428 

CALIFORNIA 


Kappy  Nahigian  Carl   Nahigian 

El  Tehran   Restaurant 

Specializing  in  Broiled  Food,  Shish  Kebab,  Chops, 

Steaks,  Chicken      .  .  Facilities  for  Private  Parties 

and  Banquets  in  Our  Gold  Room 

333  East  Market  Street  Phone  -8796 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MERTON  W.  QUICK 

PAINTING  CONTRACTOR 


Telephone  2-7197 

STOCKTON 


738  S.  Wagner  Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 


Bright  Spot  Electric  Co. 

RADIOS  AND  TELEVISION 
309  East  Weber  Ave.  Phone  9-9769 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephones:   Office  9-9581      -      Residence  2-5607 

San  Francisco  Floral  Co. 

Virgil    Azzard 

600  East   Main   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-9166  Robert  "Bob"  Weaver 

MATAR  LIQUOR  STORE 

LIQUORS   .   .     WE   SELL  THE   BEST 
339  East   Lafayette   Street 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


Telephone    4-0280 

ALFRED'S  -  So/on  of  Beauty 

Free  Parlcing  .  .   .  Air  Conditioned 
1016   West   Acacia   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  25 


The  National  Cash   Register  Co. 

Cash  Registers  -  Accounting  Machines  -  Add- 
ing Machines  .  .  .  Sales  -  Supplies  -  Service 
Stockton  Office:  118  E.  Oak  St.,  Phone  7-7418 
Modesto  Office:  816  -  13th  St.,  Phone  2-3691 
R.    H.   Intemann,    Branch   Manager 

SHERWOOD  HOTEL 

Mrs.    Grace    Kinyon.    Owner 

CLEAN  ROOMS     •      HOT  AND  COLD  WATER 

Daily  and  Weekly   Reasonable  Rates 

129  Bridge  Place  Phone  3-8190 

STOCKTON  CALIFORVIA 

AZTECA  CAFE 

Frank    Reyes,    Prop. 

Mexican  Dishes  in  Real   Mexican  Style 

Beer  and  Cold  Drinks  -  Orders  to  Take  Home 

131    South    Hunter   Street  Phone   2-9262 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CHARTER  WAY  FLORIST 

FLOWERS   FOR   ALL  OCCASIONS 
Free    Delivery 

Dial  4-2713 

CALIFORNIA 


236  East  Charter  Way 

STOCKTON 


Valley  Showcase  and   Fixture  Co. 

Store  Fixtures    -    Church  Fixtures    -    Office 

Fixtures     -     Special   Cabinet   Work 

Office  and  Factory:  921    Fremont  Street 


Telephone   3-3882 
STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL  TAFT 

124    South    Ceuter    Street  Phone    2-9208 

STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 

The  Stockton  Rug  &  Mattress 
Works 

MATTRESS   RENOVATING 
1345   South    Center   Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

FORTY-NINE  INN 

23   North    Eldorado   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

WILSHIRE  CAFE 

Fine  Food  Served  .  .  .  Steaks  -  Chops  -  Fried 
Chicken  -  Wilshire  Special  Blend  Coffee  .  .  . 
Fresh  Strawberry  Waffles  .  .  .  Breakfast,  Lunch- 
eon and  Complete  Evening  Dinners 
721  East  Charter  Way  -  Hwy  4  Phone  3-8254 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

STAR  MARKET 

GROCERIES    -    MEATS    -    VEGETABLES 

Eighth  at  South  Madison 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

S.   A.    Nichley  John    Nichley  Tom    Nichley 

NiCHLEY  &  SONS 

SEASIDE   SERVICE   STATION 

Gasolnie    -    Lubrication    -    Battery  Service 

Motor  Tune-Up    -    Car  Washing    -    Phone  2-2788 

244  W.  Harding  Way  Stockton.  Calif. 

LOS  ANGELES  HOTEL 

STEAM   HEAT 
HOT    AND    COLD    WATER    IN   EVERY    ROOM 


25  South  Center 
STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9758 

CALIFORNIA 


Dial    2. 1874 

VALLEY  GLASS  CO. 

The  House  of  Mirrors  -  Complete  Glass  Service 

700-702   South   San   Joaquin    Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN  GATE  GRILL 


119  So.  El  Dorado  Street 
STOCKTON 


Phone  3-7345 

CALIFORNIA 


fire  was  smoke.  In  just  one  place,  the 
point  where  the  body  was  originally  ly- 
ing, were  there  any  embers  left.  Once  it 
got  through  to  the  basement  it  would 
have  had  breathing  room  and  eventually 
the  whole  building  would  have  gone.  As 
it  was  the  fire  burned  so  quick  and  so  hot 
that  the  air  was  devoid  of  0-\ygen  in  a 
few  minutes.  And  all  combustion  needs 
free  o.xygen  to  exist  at  all.  If  there  had 
been  an  open  window,  or  if  one  had 
broken,  the  place  would  have  gone  up 
like  a  cracker  box.  Even  if  the  arsonist 
had  left  the  door  open  on  his  way  out. 
Rut  he  didn't.  So  we  have  something  to 
work  with." 

"Not  much,  from  the  looks  of  things," 
McGinn  remarked.  He  turned  to  Hus- 
ted  and  Engler.  "All  right,  boys.  Let's 
get  at  it." 

It  took  only  a  few  moments'  investi- 
gation to  convince  the  oiScers  they  were 
investigating  the  most  cruel  crime  they 
were  ever  likely  to  see  in  their  police 
careers.  The  club  marks  on  Mrs.  Voor- 
hies'  singed  face  stood  out  clearly.  The 
bonds  which  held  her  arms  and  legs  had 
not  been  completely  destroyed  by  flames. 
The  robbery  motive  became  apparent  im- 
mediately. 

"We  had  better  check  for  fingerprints 
on  that  cash  register,  and  any  other  place 
which  seems  to  have  been  ransacked," 
McGinn  suggested.  "Did  either  of  you 
find  anything?" 

Engler  produced  a  grey  cap.  "Just 
this,"  he  said. 

McGinn  examined  it.  "No  identifying 
marks.  But  those  ventilation  holes  are 
different  than  any  I've  ever  seen.  It's 
not  what  you  would  call  an  ordinary 
cap.    It  might  help." 

The  cap  was  the  only  clue  of  any  im- 
portance the  oiScers  found  on  the  prem- 
ises. When  pictures  had  been  taken  and 
the  body  removed  the  three  men  started 
a  house  to  house  search  for  witnesses  in 
the  neighborhood. 

"Not  that  I  have  any  hopes  of  finding 
any,"  McGinn  remarked.  "If  an\'one 
had  seen  anything,  the  fire  would  have 
been  reported." 

AVhile  the  detectives  worked,  the  story 
of  the  vicious  crime  caught  the  imagi- 
nation of  the  San  Francisco  press. 
Screaming  headlines  told  of  the  Torch 
Murder  and  top  feature  writers  de- 
scribed each  lurid  detail  of  the  crime.  B\ 
nightfall  an  aroused  public  was  demand- 
ing that  the  killer  be  apprehended. 

"^Vhat  have  you  got?"  Chief  of  Police 
William  J.  Quinn  demanded. 

"One  grey  golf  cap.  That's  all,"  Mc- 
Ginn replied.  "And  that  doesn't  mean  a 
thing." 


DON'S  DRIVE  INN 

24SS   Waterloo    Road 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

GOODYEAR  SERVICE 

Retail  Division  of  The  Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber 
Co.,  Inc.  R.  J.  Raub,  Store  Mgr. 

130  North  Eldorado  Phone  4-9481 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS   OF 

ROBERT  F.  ZELLER,  M.D. 
Channel  Sheet  Metal  Works 

Specializing   in 
BAR   AND    RESTAURANT  EQUIPMENT 


Phone  3-5048 

STOCKTON 


11    E.  Channel  St. 

CALIFORNIA 


T  E  M   M   E  '  S 

Wholesale   and    Retail 

SALADS,   RAVIOLI   AND   TAMALES 

DELICATESSEN 

1305  E.  Main  St.  Phones  2-9173  -  3-5510 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

F.  J.  Dietrich  F.  J-   Dietrich.  Jr., M.A.I. 

F.  J.  DIETRICH   &  CO. 

REAL   ESTATE      :         INSURANCE 
Telephone  4-4547  235  E.  Weber  Ave. 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Bill's  Musical   Instrument 
Repair  Shop 

Reconditioning  All   Makes   of   Instruments 

Bill  Magellan,  Graduate  of  Conn   Instrument 

Repair  School 

Phone  4-2417 

CALIFORNIA 


1137  Harding  Way 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-4779     Res.  Phone  8-8124;  45  W.  4th  St. 

Colony  Furniture  &   Restaurant 
Supplies 

New  and  Used     •      Bought  and  Sold 

Counters     •     Stools     •     Refrigerators     •     Ranges 

Cash   Registers    •    Deep   Fryers    •    Griddles 


1820   So.    Eldorado  St. 


Stockton,   Calif. 


Phone    2-9004 

HARBOR  INN 

2   East    Main   at    Center 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Reid  M.  Von  Noote,  D.D.S. 

ORTHODONTICS  EXCLUSIVELY 

Telephone  2-4411 

CALIFORNIA 


306  Regent  Court 

STOCKTON 


Stephens  Brothers,   Inc. 

Boat   Builders   and   Marine  Supplies 

345   North   Yosemite   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Mr.  Simon  Open  Every  Day  'til   10:30  P  M. 

A.  A.  MARKET 

BEER  -   WINE  -  COLD  MEATS  -  GROCERIES 
1405  E.  Harding  Way  Phone  2-9528 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL  BRONX 

L.    Warner.    Mgr. 
MODERATE    RATES 


640  E.  Main  Street 
STOCKTON 


Telephone  6-6701 

CALIFORNIA 


Page  26 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


Phone  3-6496  John  Morgan.  Owner 

PATRICIAN  STUDIOS 

Exclusive  Album   Plan 
Lifelike  Photographs    -    Fine  Portraits 

I  1    No.  Grant  Street  Stockton,  Calif. 

Phone  2-5575  Ralph  K.  Chappell 

FIRST  CALIFORNIA  COMPANY 

Room   926 
Bank  of  America  Building 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  2-53  71  The  Coopers 

Patio  and  Barbecue  Shop 

Yours  for  a  Gracious  Home  and  Garden 

1520  Pacific    Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


ED'S  RICHFIELD 


1002   North    Yosemite   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  6-6607 


Owen  R.  Ward 


ATLAS  GLASS  CO. 

MIRRORS  -  GLAZING 
Glass  for  Every  Purpose 
808   East    Weber   Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


FAGOTTI'S  COFFEE  SHOP 

2184   East   Main   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phones    4-4332     -     3-2067  Sales   and   Service 

Wilson  &  Coffey  Appliance 

Specializing   in  Automatic 

WASHERS  and   REFRIGERATORS 

113   West    Harding   Way 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


LEWIS  B.  SASLAW.  M.D. 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORINA 

ALEX  HOTEL 

25   East    Washington 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

TUXEDO  DRY  GOODS 

Yardage    -    Patterns    -    Notions    -    Hosiery 

Bee   Hive  and   Red   Heart   Yarns 

Towels   and   Linens     -     Gifts 

2018  Pacific  Ovenu^  Phone  2-6'il3 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  31551  D.  K.   Proffil.  Rog  :r  Loh 

San  Joaquin  Research  Laboratories 

Laboratory   of   Forensic   and   Legal   Chemi "';-;-, 
Laboratory  of  Agricultural  and  Food  Chemist;-   , 
Laboratory  of  Agricultural  &  General  Chem's*  — 

2253  S.  McKinley  Avenue        Stockton,  Californr-i 

Telephone    4-8324 

J.  F.  Donaldson  &  Sons 

Fisk  Tires  -  Accessories  -  Prcst-O-lite  Batterei". 
Complete    Brake    and    Motor    Tune    Up    Service 

240  North  Hunter  Street      Stockton  2.  Calilorri^ 

F.  T.  Fergusson,  D.D.S.      K.  H.  Fergusson.  D.D.S. 
R.  E.   Ferguson.  D.D.S. 

Fergusson  Dental  Offices 

California   and   Park   Sts.      Telephone   3-2411 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

COX  SHELL  SERVICE 

OPEN  24  HOURS 
El  Dorado  and  Charter  Way      Phone  2-1  ISO 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


"Why  not?" 

"We  traced  it  to  a  haberdashery.  It's 
a  peculiar  make.  But  it  was  one  of  a  lot 
of  twelve  sold  last  April.  That's  almost 
a  year.  All  of  them  sold  for  cash.  You 
can't  expect  a  cleric  to  remember  his  cus- 
tomers that  far  back." 

"That's  easy  to  understand.  How 
about  the  neighbors?" 

McGinn  shook  his  head  regretfully. 
There's  nothing  to  be  found  but  a  mo- 
tive. She  was  supposed  to  keep  a  wad  of 
money  around  the  place.  About  $2,500. 
Whoever  did  it  had  to  know  about  that. 
And  they  had  to  know  her  to  get  in.  But 
she  knew  a  awful  lot  of  people.  It's 
tough." 

"I'll  give  you  more  men,"  Quinn 
promised.  "Meanwhile  keep  plugging. 
The  man  who  did  this  is  utterly  ruthless. 
People  want  him  caught,  and  so  do  I. 
Good  luck." 

Inspectors  Percy  Kennealy  and  George 
"Paddy"  Tafer  of  the  Crime  Prevention 
Bureau  joined  McGinn's  men  in  their 
search.  They  worked  tirelessly.  On  the 
morning  of  the  eighteenth  they  picked 
up  a  blood  splattered  man  on  the  Em- 
barcadero  who  had  been  turned  in  on 
a  tip  by  another  man.  Within  minutes 
he  had  cleared  himself.  He  wound  up  in 
the  city  prison  on  a  drunk  charge.  By 
nightfall  the  case  had  bogged  down  com- 
pletely. And  on  the  next  morning  a  San 
Francisco  newspaper  ran  a  picture  of  the 
grey  golf  cap. 

Inspector  Louis  DeMattei  just  had 
time  to  glance  at  the  morning  paper  be- 
fore going  to  court  on  February  nine- 
teenth. He  settled  back  to  enjoy  himself 
briefly  during  the  lull.  The  inspector 
did  not  relax  long.  He  stared  unbeliev- 
ingly at  the  picture,  then  passed  the  pa- 
per to  his  partner,  Jack  P.  O'Connell. 

"Does  that  look  familiar?"  he  in- 
quired. 

"I'll  say  it  does,"  the  detective  replied. 
"That  Simpson  kid.  His  hearing's  this 
morning." 

"Let's  go  see  McGinn,"  DeMattei 
suggested. 

O'Connell  was  on  his  feet  before  he 
had  finished  talking.  They  left  the  Auto 
Detail  together  and  made  their  way  to 
homicide. 

"Can  I  see  that  cap?"  DeMattei  in- 
quired. 

"\  ou  sure  can  if  it  will  do  any  good," 
the  inspetcor  replied.  He  produced  an 
envelope  from  his  drawer  and  withdrew 
the  cap.  "1  here  it  is.  Ever  seen  one  like 
it?" 

"Once.  Just  once,"  DeMattei  replied. 
He  took  the  cap  from  McGinn  and  ex- 
amined  the  sweat   band  carefully.   "It's 


Hubbard's  Refrigeration  and 
Air  Conditioning 

SA1.£S    -    SERVICE    -    INSTALLATION 
11  East  Channel  Phone  2-3421 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-6850  Martin  V.  Lund 

LUND'S  JEWELRY 

15    South    California   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  2-7709 


Insurance   -   Rentals 


H.  B.  GREGERSEN 

Licensed  Real   Estate   Broker 
City   and    County    Property 

739  East  Miner  Ave.  Stockton,  Calif. 


W.  F.  BREMER,  Cabins 


605  South  Pershing 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9632 

CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  2-4250  J   E.    Froeliger 

Froeliger  Machine  Tool  Co. 

Machine     Tools     Bought,     Sold     Rebuilt — Tools 

Made    to    Order     -     Milling    Machines,    Grinders, 

Electric   Motors,   Lathes,   Drill   Presses 

2730   E.    Florida   Ave.  Stockton,   Calif. 

Phone  2   9148  Closed   Mondays 

EL   RANCHO   INN 

Charcoal  Broiled  Steaks    -    Cocktail  Bar 

Dinners  Served — 5  P.  M.  to   II   P.  M. 

145  7    Mariposa  Road  Stockton,  California 

One-Half   Mile  Southeast   Fair  Grounds 


JOHNNY'S  MEAT  MARKET 


2112  Pacific  Avenue 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-7481 

CALIFORNIA 


MAC  &  HARRISON'S  PLACE 


2939  E.  Fremont 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9860 

CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  4-0340  Lloyd   Cowan 

LLOYD'S  BUSINESS  MACHINES 

Royal  Typewriters   -   Roytype   Supplies   -   Victor 
Adding    Machines    -    Audograph    Dictating    Ma- 
chines .  .  .  Sales  -  Service  -  Rentals 

39  South  San  Joaquin  Street  Stockton,  Calif. 


Phone  2-9090 


Res.  3-3259 


R  -  H    SERVICE 

3147  McKinley    -    Highway  50  South 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

H.  J.  FRANZ  TILE  CO. 

Bathrooms      -       Drainboards       -      Store     Fronts 

102  McKenzie  Free  Estimates 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Mrs.  Kramer's  Homemade  Pies 

WHOLESALE   and   RETAIL 
311    Oak   Street  Phone  2-2582 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

DOWNER  CORPORATION 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 
Phone  2-1505  305  E.  Weber  Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

ARTHUR  GLICK 

Registered   Jeweler 
WATCHES    -    DIAMONDS    -    SILVER 

American   Gem   Society 

705  Bank  of  America  Building 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  27 


THE  MOLAR   RANCH 

99   HIGHWAY   AND   8-MlLE   ROAD 

A.  E.  TOCCOLI 

GENERAL   CONTRACTOR 

Commercial  Work    -    Quality  Homes 

Dial  6-6392  1932   W.  Euclid 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phones:  4-0427   ■   4-0230 

Authorized    Frigidaire   Service 

Sasselli's   Refrigeration  and 
Air  Conditioning 

Service   With   Satisfaction    .    .    .   Philco    Sales 
919    N.   WILSON   WAY  STOCKTON.  CALIF. 

STOCKTON   FRUIT  JUICE  CO. 

FRESH   LEMON   JUICE    -   MEXICAN   LIMES 
Phone  2-3181  503  E.  Jackson  Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DERBY  CLUB 

ERNIH   AND   JOE 

Phone    2-980S 

CALIFOR'  '  ' 


1136   S.   Center 

STOCKTON 


CARANDO  MACHINE  WORKS 

Designers  -  Manufacturers  of  Special  Machinery 
General    Machine    Work    and    Engine    Rebuilding 

420  N.  Madison   St. 

CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  2-3644 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-1295 


Leo  F,   Dentoni.  Prop. 


LEO'S  GROCERY 

Groceries  -  Fruits  -  Vegetables  -  Meats 

First   Delivery   Leaves  at    10   A.   M. 

805  North  Sierra   Nevada   Street 

STOCKTON      CALIFORM/ 

COMPLIMENTS   OF 

DR.  BILL  DASLER 

1122    West    Fremont 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


FOX  HOTEL 


HOT  AND  COLD  WATER  IN  ALL  ROOMS 
Reasonable   Rates 


305  So.   EI   Dorado   Street 
STOCKTON 


Telephone  2-9748 
CALIFORNIA 


Ross  M.    Ferrill,  Owner 


Office  Phone:    3-0106 


EAST  SIDE  PATROL 

Licensed  and  Bonded  by  the  State  of  California 

Fingerprint   Service     •      Private   Detectives 

Patrol  and  Guard  Service 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  9-9561 

AUTOMOTIVE  PARTS  CO. 

244-248  North   Hunter  Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

EMIL'S  CABINET  SHOP 

Millwork    -    Windows    -    Doors    -    Furniture    Re- 
pairing -  Quality  and  Workmanship  Guaranteed 

1640  East  Pinchot  Street  Bus.  Phone  3-8123 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone:   Office  21441  Res   3-5078 

DR.  HARRY  LYLE  LEE 

PHYSICIAN   -   SURGEON   -   OSTEOPATH 

430  South   San  Joaquin  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Harris  Manufacturing  Company 

Manufacturers    of 
FARM  AND   AUTOMOTIVE   EQUIPMENT 

Main  Office  and  Factory:  702  North  Wilson  Way 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


the  cap  all  right,"  he  muttered.  "It  has 
to  be.  I  remember  the  sweat  stains." 

"What  cap?"  McGinn  almost  shout- 
ed. 

"About  a  month  ago  we  picked  up  this 
Ivid  for  auto  theft.  I  noticed  the  ventila- 
tion holes  and  asked  the  kid  to  see  the 
cap.  \Vhen  I  looked  inside  it  I  noticed 
the  sweat  pattern.  The  kid  is  out  on  bail 
now." 

"Where  can  we  get  him?" 

"Don't  get  a  sweat  up,"  DeMattei 
replied.  "He's  coming  to  us.  In  fact  he's 
due  in  court  this  morning.  And  Jack 
and  I  are  due  there  right  now." 

"I'll  send  someone  with  you." 

"Okay.  But  let's  not  get  excited.  We 
want  to  spring  this  on  him  as  a  surprise. 
Let's  go  through  the  hearing  and  give 
his  atterney  a  chance  to  go  home.  \Ve'll 
need  a  confession.  And  we  won't  get 
one  with  a  lawyer  around.  A  cap  isn't 
very  strong  evidence." 

McGinn  turned  to  AVafer.  "You  go, 
Paddy,"  he  instructed.  "You  dont  belong 
to  the  detail.  No  one  will  suspect  you." 

Wafer  placed  his  hat  on  his  head  and 
followed  DeMattei  and  O'Connell  to 
the  third  floor  courtroom. 

Charles  Simpson  was  dressed  flawless- 
ly in  a  blue  suit  for  his  court  appear- 
ance. He  was  there  only  a  few  moments, 
while  his  attorney  asked  for  a  delay. 
^Vhen  the  motion  was  granted,  the  law- 
yer and  the  youth  left  the  courtroom. 
DeMattei,  O'Connell  and  Wafer 
watched  poker  faced.  They  were  a  few 
feet  away  from  the  youth  when  he  said 
goodbye  to  the  attorney.  When  the  bar- 
rister was  out  of  sight  they  approached 
the  boy. 

"How  do  you  feel  this  morning, 
Charlie?"  DeMattei  inquired. 

"Fine.  Just  fine." 

"^'ou  shouldn't,"  O'Connell  told  him. 

"Fhe  youth  frowned,  "^^^ly  not." 

"Because  you  are  under  arrest  for  the 
murder  of  Albina  Voorhies,"  \Vafer 
announced  bluntly. 

"Say,  what  is  this?"  the  boy  demand- 
ed. "You  can't  get  away  with  a  thing 
like  this." 

"Oh  yes,  we  can,"  DeMattei  told  him. 
"Come  on  up  to  the  homicide  detail  and 
we'll  tell  you  how." 

In  the  presence  of  Wafer,  McGinn, 
O'Connell,  Engler,  and  Chief  Quinn, 
Simpson  was  confronted  with  the  cap. 

"You  can't  get  around  this  cap,"  De- 
Mattei told  him.  "It  was  found  on  the 
scene.  And  I  remember  the  sweat  marks 
on  the  band.  You're  stuck." 


TAYLOR  AND  SONS 

Authorized   Shell    Dealers 

2060  East  Main  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

DANTE'S  MODERN  AUTO  TOP 

Complete   Auto   Upholstery   -   Fiber,   Plastic   and 

Nylon    Covers    -    Convertible   Tops    -    Truck    and 

Tractor    Cushions    Repaired 

204  No.  Grant  Street  Phone  3-42S6 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

DELTA  SPORTING  GOODS 

Fishing  Tackle  and   Hunting  Equipment 
1440  East  Main   Street  Phone  3-4328 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Res.    7-7504  Bus.  4-4022 

HARRY  BOAZ  •  >lufo   Repairing 

Motor    Tune-Up    and    Electrical    Work      -      New 

and  Rebuilt  Motors     -     Brake  Work  a  Speciality 

1415  East  Fremont  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

BROWNING'S 

Interior  Decorations     -     Home  Furnishings 
245  East   Miner  Avenue  Telephone  7-7764 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

E.  T.  DROWN 

Licensed   Real  Estate   Broker 

Investments     -     Exchanges 

Office:   2-1 155  Residence:   3-166S 

119  North  San  Joaquin  Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

AURORA  BODY  AND   FENDER 
WORKS 

Auto   Glass   and  Auto   Painting 

S.    Ncri,   Prop. 

446  No  Aurora  Street  Phone  2-0309 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-7415  Andy  Erickson 

GOLD  MEDAL  ICE  CREAM  CO. 

"TOP   QUAUTY" 

245  No.   El    Dorado   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

ALLMAN   PAINTING  AND 
DECORATING  CO. 

Interior  Decorating  -  Paperhanging  -   Texturing 

2204  No.  Wilson  Way  Phone  3-1801 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Henry    Nickels 


Stockton    3-72  16 


NICKOLS  TRANSPORTATION  CO. 

FREIGHT    HAULING 

San   Francisco    Bay   and  Tributaries 

43   West   Weber   Avenue 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Joseph   Rossi.  Owner 


Telephone  2-9548 


UNITED  STATES  HOTEL 

NEWLY  FURNISHED   AND  RENOVATED 
Daily   $1-25   and   Up       •       Weekly   $7.50  and   Up 
103     South     Center     Street,     Corner     of     Market 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

MIKE'S  BAIT  SHOP 

Fresh  Monterey  Sardines    -     Live  Minnows 
Fishing  Tackle    -     Open   at  4:30  A.  M. 


12   East  Weber  Avenue 
STOCKTON 


Phone  7-7531 
CALIFORNIA 


HOEFLER'S  COFFEE  SHOP 

HOME   MADE   PIES 
505   North    Hunter 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


Harry  H   Graham,   Mgr. 

MICROTONE  OF  STOCKTON 

GRAHAM   HEARING  SERVICE 


212  California  Building 
STOCKTON 


Phone  3-9948 
CALIFORNIA 


Page  28 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


HOTEL  BRYANT 

Reasonable  Room  Rales — Steam  Heated 
Weekly    -    Monthly  Rates 


25  South   Commerce 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9279 

CALIFORNIA 


RICHMOND'S 

"Manufacturers   Since    1916" 

Venetian    Blinds      •      Awnings 

Transparent    •    Shades    •    Window 

127   E.  Channel   Street           Telephone  7-7364 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

C.  E.  STABLER,  D.D.S. 

Telephone  7-7623 
Suite  1003  Medico-Dented   Building 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

FRANKLIN  TRAILER  SALES 

Pan-American  -  Terra  Cruiser  -  Travel  Eze 
Anderson 

244S  North  Wilson  Way  Phone  4-3823 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AL'S  WAFFLE  SHOP 

BREAKFAST      •      LUNCH      •      DINNER 
1107  East  Main  Street  Phone  2-8769 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

M.  CORREN  &  SONS 

— Our  47th   Year — 

Stockton's    Leading    Furniture,    Floor    Covering 

and   Appliance  Store. 

120-148  S.  San  Joaquin  St.  Phone  6-6711 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


KEN'S  MARKET 

505  W.  Harding  Way  Phone  4-0318 

STOC  KTON CALIFORNIA 

FRY  BROS. 

FURNITURE     -    APPLIANCES 

Package   Delivery 

502  No.  Hunter  St  Phone  4-2283 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

P.    Malanca,   Proprietor 

BI-RITE  MARKET 

Groceries     -     Meats     -     Vegetables 

Beer  and   Wine 

California   and    Jefferson    Sts.  Phone    2-2853 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

THIEL  BROS. 

LICENSED  CONTRACTORS 

Structural  Steel    -    Pipe    -    Machinery  and   Pipe 

Installation    -    All  Types  of  Welding 

1997   Mariposa  Road  Phone  8-8775 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

STAR   FISH  CO. 

311    Eouth   El   Dorado   Street 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

CONSTANZA  TAMALE  CAFE 

1820   Lucerne  Phone   4-0283 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

EASTSIDE  MARKET 

Groceries  -     Fresh   Vegetables 
Free  Delivery    (Open  All  Day  Sunday) 


The  element  of  surprise  worked.  Simp- 
son looked  startled,  then  frightened. 

"All  right,  I'll  talk,"  he  announced. 
"I  killed  her.  I  guess  it  looks  pretty  bad 
tor  me. 

Later  in  the  day  Simpson  confessed 
the  crime  in  detail,  going  over  each  step 
with  the  officers.  He  declared  he  had  a 
business  connection  with  the  woman  and 
that  through  that  he  had  heard  of  the 
rumored  "heap  of  money." 

"I  knew  I  would  have  to  kill  her  for 
the  money,"  he  declared.  "She  knew  me. 
I  couldn't  get  it  any  other  way." 

"How  much  did  you  get?"  McGinn 
inquired. 

"Three  dollars." 

On  April  20,  1931,  Charles  Simpson 
entered  a  plea  of  guilty  to  the  murder 
of  the  elderly  woman.  He  was  sentenced 
to  be  executed  for  his  crime  in  San 
Quentin  Prison.  He  died  on  the  prison 
gallows  on  July  10  of  the  same  year. 

THE  END. 


2169  East   Main   Street 
STOCKTON 


Phone  4-4265 

CALIFORNIA 


I'm  Ready,  Coach 

(Continued  from  page  7 } 

San  Joaquin  County  with  better  law  en- 
forcement. 

Sheriff  Sousa's  next  step  was  to  see 
that  all  deputies  were  dressed  in  service- 
able, neat  uniforms.  Then  he  turned  his 
attention  to  their  ability  and  education. 
Today  every  man  must  take  refresher 
training  courses  for  two  weeks  every 
year.  These  courses  include  instruction 
in  all  phases  of  peace  officer  fundamentals 
and  a  rundown  of  new  laws.  In  addition 
to  the  extra  schooling,  every  man  must 
take  periodic  examinations  which  estab- 
lish his  standing  with  the  force.  And 
the  examinations  do  not  stop  with  the 
ordinary  deputy.  Every  officer  up  to  and 
including  the  rank  of  captain  must  take 
the  tests. 

As  a  step  toward  forwarding  with  his 
modernization  program.  Sheriff  Sousa 
sent  his  old  pupil,  Michael  Canlis,  back 
to  school.  Canlis'  new  alma  mater  was 
no  prep  school,  however.  He  attended 
the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  Na- 
tional Police  Academy  in  Washington 
and  returned  well  versed  in  up-to-date 
methods  which  would  improve  the  San 
Joaquin  County  Sheriff's  office. 

Canlis  first  turned  his  attention  to  the 
Bureau  of  Identification  which  had  long 
been  a  matter  of  pride  to  the  Stockton 
law  enforcement  agency.  The  bureau  is 
one  of  the  oldest  in  the  state.  Its  records 
include    the    first    police    identification 


Drs.  Merchant  and  Halley 

MEDICAL  BUILDING 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

DOLLAR  FOR  DOLLAR 

THERE  ARE  NO  BETTER  HOMES 
THAN 

COUNTRY  CLUB  ESTATES 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA  TRACTOR  AND 
EQUIPMENT  CORP. 

Phone  2-8742  1247  So.  Wilson  Way 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    8-8566 

SERVICE    -    SALES    -     RENTALS    -    PARTS 
GM     Diesel     Engines       -       Ingersol-Rand     Tools 

Koehring  Shovels    -     Kwik-Mix  Mixers 

Quonset  Stran-Steel  Buildings    -    Allis-Chalmers 

Farm    Machinery 

Moore  Equipment  Company,  Inc. 

North  99   Highway  1 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Stockton  Scavenger's  Association 
Inc. 


424  East  Weber  Avenue 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-3876 

CALIFORNIA 


frDeuoATessen 

3228-3236  Pacific  Ave.  Phone  4-5226 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone   2-9922 

ACE  ROOMS 

15   East   Washington   Street 
STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  DELTA 

R.    R.    Martin 


241   No.  San  Joaquin  St. 

STOCKTON 


Phone  2-9642 

CALIFORNIA 


SAN  JOAQUIN  MORTUARY 

AND   BURIAL  INSURANCE 

W.   F.   Bell   Pres.      -      Clifton  Crawford,   Prop. 
544  South  California  St.  Telephone  3-6434 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


BENTLEY'S  TRAILER  PARK 


2189  East  Taylor 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  29 


Phone  2-4355 

C  A  N  N  E  R 

Y 

WORKER 

'  S 

UNION 

Local  No.  601 

AMERICAN 

FEDERATION 

OF  LABOR 

• 

.  .  .  Office  .  .  . 

425  East  Miner  Avenue 

STOCKTON  2,  CALIF. 

.  -  .»——»------.  -...--.-----4 

OR  VI  S    & 
C   L   I   N  G  E   R 

WHOLESALE  BUTCHERS 
FROZEN  MEAT  LOCKERS 
CUSTOM  SLAUGHTERING 


Telephone  4-4657 
Linden  Road  at  Diverting  Canal 

Post  Office  Box  82 
STOCKTON,  CALIF. 


photographs  ever  taken,  including  the 
historical  prints  turned  out  by  Captain 
I.  \V.  Lees  of  the  San  Francisco  Police 
Department  in  1855.  The  records  have 
been  kept  with  painstaking  care  ever 
since.  Hut  this  was  not  enough  for  Un- 
dersherif?  Canlis.  Under  Sheriff  Sousa's 
direction  he  installed  a  modern  filing 
system,  purchased  new  equipment  and 
placed  carefully  trained  men  in  charge  of 
it.  Today,  under  the  direction  of  Lieu- 
tenant P.  A  I.  Morton  the  bureau  is  rank- 
ed with  the  best  in  California  and  bow 
to  none  in  the  nation. 

Politics  have  played  no  part  in  the  way 
Sousa  runs  his  office.  The  only  yardstick 
by  which  a  modern  San  Joaquin  County 
Deputy,  or  office  hand,  is  measured  is  by 
his  or  her  honesty  or  efficiency.  If  a  man 
has  what  it  takes,  he  gets  somewhere. 

To  supplement  his  none  too  large  de- 
partment, Sheriff  Sousa  has  organized 
and  maintained  a  force  of  reserve  depu- 
ties which  is  today  the  office's  pride  and 
joy.  There  is  no  swearing  in  of  informal 
deputies  in  San  Joaquin  County.  In  case 
of  emergency.  Sheriff  Sousa  can  call  on 
an  organized  reserve  of  trained,  high 
quality  men  who  will  supplement  his 
own  organization  with  equal  knowledge 
and  ability.  Selection  is  the  Sheriff's 
main  problem  with  the  reserve.  There 
are  plenty  of  volunteers,  but  few  men 


Sheriff  Carlos  Sousa 

who  are  willing  to  meet  the  rigid  require- 
ments set  up  by  Sousa.  A  reserve  deputy 
on  Sheriff  Sousa's  force  must  take  the 
same  indoctrination  course  as  a  regular 
employee,  he  is  subjected  to  the  same 
rigid  discipline  and  must  serve  on  active 


RICHMOND- 
CHASE 
COMPANY 

Quality  Packers  of 

CANNED  FRUITS 

ASPARAGUS 

DRIED  FRUITS 

FRUIT  NECTARS 


SAN  JOSE 

STOCKTON 

CALIFORNIA 


INDEPENDENT 
TRUCKING 
COMPANY 


CONTRACT  HAULING 


F.  J.  Garavano 

Telephone  2-3255 
401   SOUTH   LINCOLN 

STOCKTON,  CALIF. 


Page  30 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


V  I  C  K  '  S     INN 


40  South  Center  Street 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-9939 


'--  -4 


R.   L.   BERVE 
TRACTOR    CO. 

Dearborn  Farm  Equipment 

Ford  Engineered  for  Faster,  Better 

Farming    .    .    .    Ford    Hydraulic 

Control 

A  QUALITY  LINE  OF  BASIC 
IMPLEMENTS 

Ford  Tractors 

1881  East  Charter  Way 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


■— ^ 


65c  CHICKEN  KITCHEN 

Highway  99  Between 
Stockton  and  Lodi 


"BEST  CHICKEN  IN 
THE  COUNTRY" 


Stockton  4-0812 


Greetings  to  the 
Police  and  Police  Officers 

GERALD  D.  KENNEDY 


STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


duty  for  a  limited  number  of  hours  each 
month.  Even  then  only  a  few  of  the  vol- 
unteers are  chosen.  Only  the  best  men 
are  picked.  Sherifif  Sousa's  reserve  force 
includes  everything  from  professional 
men  to  laborers,  but  each  one  must  meet 
the  same  high  standards. 


Undersheriff  Michael  Canlis 

A  sore  point  in  the  office  from  the 
Sheriff's  point  of  view  is  the  county  jail. 
As  recently  as  last  November  a  bond 
issue  to  provide  funds  for  a  new  one  was 
turned  down  by  the  voters. 

"Don't  get  me  wrong,"  Sheriff  Sousa 
remarked.  "Our  jail  is  a  good  one.  And 
believe  it  or  not  it  is  always  spotlessly 
clean.  But  it  was  built  more  than  half  a 
century  ago  for  a  maximum  of  about 
seventy  prisoners.  At  times  now  we  have 
hundreds  in  it.  The  problem  is  a  serious 
one.  But  jails  are  the  hardest  thing  in 
the  world  to  get  money  for." 

Early  in  his  career  as  Sheriff,  Sousa 
enlarged  and  improved  the  prison  system. 
He  acquired  360  acres  for  the  prison 
honor  farm  and  completed  the  erection 
of  a  modern  kitchen  and  dining  room 
which  can  accommodate  400  men.  To 
these  he  added  dormitory  buildings  with 
modern  facilities  where  men  serving  time 
for  misdemeanors  are  provided  the  best 
in  housing  and  recreation.  The  farm 
includes  a  dairy  building,  a  processing 
plant  which  takes  care  of  the  vast  vege- 
table crops  raised  there,  clean  and  sani- 
tary pens  and  corrals  for  more  than  100 
swine  and  over  20  head  of  dairy  cattle, 
a  smokehouse  for  curing  pork  for  other 


L 


HOLLY   SUGAR 
CORPORATION 

WORLD'S  FINEST  QUALITY 
SUGAR 

Grown  awl  Manufactured 
in  California 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-0156 

JOHNSTON  ROCK  CO. 

Clean  Crushed  Rock 

Paving  Mixes   -   Concrete  Mix 

Washed  Gravel  -  Oiled  Surfacing 

Concrete  Sand    -   Asphalt  Sand 

Screenings 


L 


p.  O.  Box  262 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


GAINES  MARKETS 

Stockton's  Finest  Independent 
Food  Stores 

No.  2—2222  Sharps  Lane 
No.  3—3314  North  Delaware 
No.  4 — 4115  North  El  Dorado 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  4-7301 

DANA  MOTORS 

Motor  Rebuilders  and  Distributors 
Builders  of  Over  40,000  Engines 

.  .  .  Factory  .  .  . 

1731  "K"  Street,  Sacramento, 

California 

GENERAL  AUTO  REPAIRING 

338  North  El  Dorado  Street 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  31 


HOTEL  STOCKTON 

GOLDEN  NUGGET  ROOM 

DINING  ROOM 

SNACK   BAR 

Complete  Catering  Service 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Stockton  9-9761 

ELECTRIC  PLANNING 
MILL 

MiLLwoRK,  Cabinet  Work 

AND  Lumber 

Store  and  Office  Fixtures  .  .  .  Sash 

Doors,  Mouldings 

Corner  Hazelton  Avenue 
AND  Monroe  Street 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  4-4679 

PARISIAN  LAUNDRY 
AND  DRY  CLEANERS 

Our  Workmanship  Is  Of 
The  Highest  Quality 

125  East  Flora 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


Branches  at  Stockton,  Tracy 
Brentwood,  Oakley 

DAY  -  LITE  MARKET 

Wholesale   -    Retail 
MEATS  AND  GROCERIES 

Main  Office 

107  - 109  South  Center  Street 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-3782 


county  institutions  and  a  machine  shop. 
There  are  no  fences  around  the  farm 
and  escapes  are  few. 

Sheriff  Sousa's  record  for  honesty  and 
integrity  has  been  outstanding  among 
peace  officers  throughout  the  country.  In 
San  Joaquin  County  no  one  has  ever  had 
the  temerity  to  hint  that  he  was  not 
tioing  the  best  job  possible.  Even  his 
political  foes  can  only  say,  "\'es,  he  is 
doing  fine.  I  would  just  do  it  different." 
A  weak  argument  at  election  time  at 
best. 

He  kept  his  promise  to  the  late  Sheriff 
Martin  Ansbro  when  he  told  him  he 
would  run  a  clean  campaign.  When  Ans- 
bro died  and  he  stepped  into  his  shoes  he 
filled  those  of  a  fine  man.  And  he  con- 
tinued to  make  his  word  good.  He  kept 
the  office  both  clean  and  progressive. 
The  results  have  been  outstanding.  To- 
date  he  is  the  administrator  of  an  office 
which  contain  as  fine  a  group  of  peace 
officers  as  there  is  in  the  state. 

The  names  of  Canlis,  Captain  Denzel 
Troute,  and  Lieutenants  Morton,  Joseph 
Hagengruber,  Andy  Tickvitza,  William 
Kates,  Elmer  Briscoe,  Loren  Brown, 
Allison  Johnson,  Frank  Esau,  Ivan  Com- 
mons and  all  others  are  known  far  be- 
yond the  limits  of  San  Joaquin  County. 
The  old  mentor  has  coached  himself  a 
good  team.  Why  did  he  switch  from 
recreation  work  to  a  peace  officer's  job? 

"\Vell,  I'll  tell  you,"  Sousa  explains. 
"1  always  wanted  to  be  Sheriff.  It's  a 
good  job.   I  like  it." 

The  old  coach  acts  like  he  likes  it. 


CLEAN  TERMINALS 

The  pantry  and  medicine  cabinet  at 
home  still  contain  all  the  ingredients 
necessary  to  clean  and  keep  clean  the 
battery  terminals,  according  to  the  Na- 
tional Automobile  Club.  Baking  soda, 
poured  over  the  posts  and  then  moist- 
ened, will  remove  any  corrosive  deposit 
and  a  slight  coating  of  vaseline  after- 
ward will  keep  them  clean. 


HENS   IN   NEW  MEXICO 

There  are  approximately  one  million 
laying  hens  in  New  Mexico.,  according 
to  the  National  Automobile  Club.  Each 
hen  lays  approximately  two  himdred 
eggs  per  year. 


HOTEL     CLARK 

Arbor  Room  Walnut  Grill 

Sutter  and  Market  Streets 

STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 

Newcomb  Hotel  Interests 


THE    WONDER 

SMART  FASHIONS 

for 

WOMEN  and  CHILDREN 

340  East  Main  Street 
STOCKTON,  CALIFORNIA 


HEmlock  1-7171 

Coca  -  Cola 

The  Refreshing  Drink 

ALWAYS  AROUND  THE 
CORNER  FROM  ANYWHERE 

1500  Mission  Street 

The  Coca-Cola  Bottling 

Company  of  California 

san  francisco,  calif. 


Page  32 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


^^Compliments 
of 


a 


FRIEND" 


LET .  .  . 

BLUE^ 
SHIELD 

Shield  you 

from 

medical  bills 


California 

Physicians  Service 

450  Mission  Street 

San  Francisco 

SUtter  1-4633 


Sacramento  Scramble 

(Continued  from  page  13) 

Everybody  Waited 

Along  K  Street,  as  at  busy  cross  streets 
the  country  over,  this  was  a  real  head- 
ache for  years.  Ten  or  more  cars  would 
pile  up  during  a  single  change  of  a  sig- 
nal, but  one  motorist  making  a  right 
turn  was  lucky  if  he  could  make  the 
turn  on  the  green  light ;  and  everybody 
behind  him  waited. 

A  small  group  of  Sacramentans, 
headed  by  Bert  E.  Geisreiter,  council- 
man and  former  mayor,  pioneered  the 
Scramble  system  in  Sacramento.  Even 
though  it  had  been  tried  out  success- 
fully in  some  other  cities,  including 
Denver,  Colo.,  Boston,  and  Vancouver, 
B.C.,  they  were  hard  put  at  first  to  find 
people  willing  to  put  out  their  necks  to 
back  a  trial  run. 

In  mid  September,  however,  they  put 
the  idea  across  and  it  was  tried  on  K 
at  Eighth  and  Ninth  Streets.  Everybody 
waited  apprehensively,  some  with  grim 
thoughts  about  how  busy  the  ambulances 
were  going  to  be  when  people  got  con- 
fused. 


Chief  James  Hicks 

System  Approved 

And,  although,  some  pedestrians  got 
a  bit  mixed  up  the  first  day  or  so,  even 
the  most  ardent  backers  of  the  idea  were 
surprised  at  how  well  it  worked.  Minor 
bugs  had  to  be  worked  out  but  from 
the  start  it  was  a  whizbang  success. 

In  fact,  two  days  after  the  system 
was  started,  the  City  Council  went  on 
record  approving  it,  and  instructed  City 
Manager  Bartley  W.  Cavanaugh  to 
check  up  on  the  feasibility  of  extending 
it.  Now  plans  are  in  the  works  to  Scram- 


COMFORT 

Mile  after  Mile  on  the 

Route  of  the  Orient 

Star 

One  trip  with  P.A.L.  and  you'll 
never  forget  the  friendly,  person- 
alized service  that  makes  you  feel 
like  an  honored  guest. 

CrO  P.  A,  L.  .  .  . 

and  discover 
real  luxury 
in  air  travel 

Philippine  Air  Lines 

spanning  %  of  the  World 
P.A.L.  Office:  DO  2-1688 

212  Stockton  Street 
San  Francisco 


Best  Wishes  to  All 

Our  Friends  in  the 

San  Francisco  Police 

Department 


Huntington  Hotel 

1075  California  St. 

San  Francisco 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


P^tge  33 


HEALD  ENGINEERING 
COLLEGE 

Van  Ness  Avenue 
AT  Post  Street 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


GILMORE  STEEL  AND 

SUPPLY  COMPANY, 

INC. 

Alloy  Bars,  Cold   Finished  Bars, 

Plates,  Hot  Rolled  Bars,  Structural 

Shapes,  Sheets,  Strips,  Boiler 

Tubes. 

Concrete  Reinforcements 

840  Brannan  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


San  Francisco  Federal 
Savings  &  Loan  Assn. 

83  Post  Street 

San  Francisco 

DO.  2-0072 

Insured  Savings  •  Home  Loans 

Arnold  E.  Archibald 
President 


UNderhill  3-1250 

SKILSAW,    INC. 

285  South  Van  Ness  Avenue 
San  Francisco,  Calif. 

.  .  .  East  Bay  .  .  . 
ENterprise  1-0035 


hie  the  Y  Street  intersections  at  Seventh, 
Tenth,  Eleventh  and  Twelfth  Streets — 
the  busiest  in  the  city — and  those  on  L 
at  Eleventh  and  Twelfth. 

The  police  department  has  a  big  job  to 
do  in  connection  with  the  system.  Here 
is  what  City  Traffic  Engineer  D.  Jack- 
son Faustman,  advises: 


Traffic  Captain  Bennett 

Obedience  Needed 

"Strict  obedience  on  the  part  of  both 
pedestrians  and  vehicle  operators  is  ne- 
cessary if  the  full  advantage  of  the  sys- 
tem is  to  be  obtained.  If  pedestrians 
consistently  violate  the  signal  indica- 
tions, the  additional  delay  caused  to  vehi- 
cles on  the  succeeding  phase  more  than 
cancels  out  any  advantage  which  can  be 
gained   by  the  timing  system." 

He  added,  however,  that  both  drivers 
and  walkers  are  cooperating  well. 

Of  course,  mistakes  can't  be  helped. 
One  Sacramento  police  officer  can  testi- 
fy to  that,  and  probably  will,  to  the  end 
of  his  days.  The  first  time  he  went 
through  a  Scramble  system  on  his  tri- 
cycle something  went  wrong.  Before  he 
got  through  the  pedestrians  got  going 
and  he  was  stuck  in  the  middle  of  about 
100  of  them  and  couldn't  move  a  foot. 

And  it  was  just  his  luck  that  a  pho- 
tographer came  along  and  got  an  excel- 
lent shot  of  him  sitting  there  dejectedly, 
wondering  what  to  do  about  it  all. 


PATCH  THE  DRIVEWAY 

Don't  allow  a  driveway  surface  that 
needs  patching  to  go  unattended.  A  patch 
in  time  reduces  the  cost  of  driveway 
maintenance,  according  to  the  National 
Automobile  Club. 


ORIENTAL 
TEA  GARDEN 

//;  the  Heart  of 

GOLDEN  GATE  PARK 

SAN  FRANCISCO 


FAIRBANKS-MORSE 
COMPANY 


630  Third  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


GRANNY    GOOSE 
FOODS 


916  -  98th  Avenue 
OAKLAND  3,  CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL  WHITCOMB 


Market  Street  at  Eighth 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


Page  34 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


NATIONAL  ICE  AND 
COLD  STORAGE  CO. 


417  Montgomery  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


CONNELL  BROS.,  LTD. 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


Seasons  Greetings 
THE  SILVER  RAIL 


974  Market  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


PIERCE-RUDOLPH 

STORAGE  COMPANY, 

Ltd. 

Estabished  1898 

UNITED  VAN  LINES,  INC. 
NATION-WIDE  MOVING 

1450  Eddy  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


Pistol  Pointing 

(Continued  frnm   page  14) 

Championship  Scores  for  1952 

(  Best  3  out  of  5  matches) 

Master  (open)  Class 

1st  place T.  D.  Elton 3166 

2nd  place Karl  Schaugaard  3166 

3rd  place Frank    Borneman 3153 

4th   place Ed    Preston. 1047 

Expert  Class 

1st  place Chas.    Bromhower 3115 

2nd  place Milt  Klipfel 3114 

3rd  place .Ed    Hamilton 1037 

4th  place Dave  Menary  1035 

Sharpshooter  Class 

1st  place Mike  Carroll  3026 

2nd  place Joe  Durst  3003 

3rd  place N.  Werner  2984 

4th  place John  Bellera   2983 

Marksman  Class 

1st  place Bob  Till  2942 

2nd  place H.   Stalker  2907 

3rd  place _ E.   Mclnerney  2893 

4th  place J.  Yuen  2873 

Marksman  Second  Class 

1st  place Milt  Morris  2488 

2nd  place P.   Millichap  2402 

Team  Scores 

Year  champions  in  Class  "A"  team 
division,  California  Highway  Patrol 
team. 

Years  champions  in  Class  "B"  team 
division,  Public  Target  Range  team. 

THE  OAKLAND  MATCH 
FOR  NOVEMBER 

Pistol  shooting  develops  sterling  char- 
acters and  good  fellowship  as  we  can 
witness  by  the  following.  In  the  C.F. 
short  course,  Bill  Thomas  was  nosed 
out  of  the  second  place  e.\pert  medal  by 
Hal  Fellows  via  the  Creedmore  route 
which  made  Bill  rather  indignant  as  he 
always  wanted  a  silver  medal.  Bill's 
good  fellowship  remark  left  the  boys  in 
rather  a  funk  as  to  the  exact  meaning  of 
the  quote  (and  we  quote).  "Gee,  but  I 
sure  would  of  liked  to  have  beaten  Hal 
outta  that  medal  as  he's  a  friend  of 
mine."  (And  here  we  unquote.) 

Was  interested  in  our  good  friend 
United  States  Marine  Klipfel  while  he 
was  shooting  the  .22  Camp  Perry  match 
and  the  resultant  case  of  jitters  that 
affects  one  when  the  scores  are  high. 
Klip  was  doing  fine  in  the  slow  fire  with 
a  nice  possible  and  repeated  the  possible 
in  the  timed  fire  string  but  "ole  man 
jitters"  took  over  in  the  rapid  fire  string 
and  poor  ole  Klip  wound  up  with  a  99 
and  a  cracker-jack  score  of  299  to  boot. 
Too  bad,  as  we  were  looking  for  a  rec- 
ord. 

Pistol  Minded 

The  armed  services  are  sure  pistol 
minded  these  days  and  each  match  brings 
out  a  new  army,  navy  or  marine  team 
and  Sunday  was  no  exxeption  when  the 
U.S. S.Boxer  sent  two  teams  over  to  the 


HOTEL  FRANCIS 

CENTRALLY  LOCATED 

346  Sutter  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO  8,  CALIF. 


J 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A 

FRIEND 


TAY-HOLBROOK  INC. 

Successors  to 

GEORGE  H.  TAY  COMPANY 

Established  1848 

HOLBROOK,  MERRILL  & 

STETSON 

Established  1850 

165  Eighth  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO  1,  CALIF. 


INTERNATIONAL 

BROTHERHOOD 

OF    TEAMSTERS 

GRaystone  4-6544 

25  Taylor  Street 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 

Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  35 


MArket   1-8261 

WESTERN  TRUCK 

LINES,  LTD. 

IN  THE  WEST  SHIP 

WESTERN 

75  Columbia  Square 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 

— -------------------------^ 

GArfield   1-6200 

LEVI  STRAUSS  AND 

COMPANY 

• 

98  Battery  Street 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 

EMERSON  TELEVISION 
AND  RADIO 

•IN  EVERY  SCREEN  SIZE, 

EVERY  STYLE— EMERSON  IS 

AMERICAS  BEST  BUY." 

SOLD  ONLY  THROUGH 

AUTHORIZED  EMERSON 

TELEVISION  DEALERS. 


BASALT  ROCK  CO., 
INC. 

Eighth  and  River 
NAPA,  CALIFORNIA 


Sixth  and  Berry  Streets 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


range  for  their  first  try  at  a  team  match. 
However,  they  didn't  officially  enter  in 
any  of  the  team  matches  but  were  just 
trying  out  to  see  how  the  boys  behaved 
under  fire.  Next  month  nia\be  we'll  see 
wot  happens — officially. 


Ed  Preston 

During  the  matches  some  kid  came 
running  up  the  hill  from  the  zoo  ex- 
claiming that  a  lion  had  busted  loose  and 
was  terrorizing  the  people.  Immediately 
the  brave  pistoleers  grabbed  all  sorts  of 
shooting  irons  and  started  off  for  the 
lion  hunt,  mostly  all  with  fear  and  trepi- 
dation. Of  course,  it  was  just  a  young- 
ter's  prank  but  what  we  are  trying  to 
bring  out  is  that  after  the  excitement 
was  ov'er  Ralph  Johnson  made  the  sage 
remark  that  not  a  one  of  the  brave 
hunters  had  any  bullets  in  their  guns! 
Last  Laugh 

For  some  time  now  Frank  Biven  has 
been  shooting  an  old  Colt  single  action 
gun  in  the  matches  and  Frank  Lipoid 
has  ben  giving  him  a  rather  rufi  time  of 
it.  Up  comes  the  C.  F.  Camp  Perry 
match  and  Frank  B  takes  the  first  place 
medal  with  a  2')2  in  the  marksman  class 
which,  by  the  bye,  was  two  points  lower 
than  the  master  class  high.  Frank  L. 
now  has  a  red  face,  Frank  B.  is  still 
shooting  the  old  klunk  and  lafifing  at 
Frank  L.  with  each  drop  of  the  hammer. 

The  annual  banquet  of  the  Western 
Revolver  Association  will  be  held  in 
January  of  next  year  at  which  time  the 
winners  of  the  yearly  aggregate  scores 
will  be  announced.  The  yearly  attend- 
ance prizes  will  be  in  the  form  of  small 
loving  cups  of  gold  for  those  attending 
for  two  or  more  years  and  silver  for 
those  of  one  year. 

There  were  180  shooters  present  Sun- 
day and  sure  had  a  swell  day  for  shoot- 


CLUB  70 

70  TURK  STREET 


SAN    FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


EXbrook  2-9500 

SAM  GOTTARDO   HOTEL  AND 
RESTAURANT 

MIXED   DRINKS    -     BEER     -     WINE 
ITALIAN   DINNERS 

217  COLUMBUS  AVENUE 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


JOHNS  RENDEZVOUS 

Still  Sertiiig  San  fraiichco' s  Vines/  I'ood 

UNDER  ORIGINAL  OWNERS 

DANCING  -  ENTERTAINMENT 

EVERY  NIGHT   (except  Sunday) 

.  .  .  DINNER  FROM  $3.00  .  .  . 

Songs  and  Music  You  Like  in  Our 

Smart  Cockiail   Lounge 

Lunch  and  Dinner 

After  Theater  Supper  Suggestions 

DOiGLAS    2-8375 
50  OSGOOD  PLACE 

off  Broadway,   bet.  Montgomery  &  Sansome 


UNIVERSAL  SUPPLY 
CORPORATION 


825  FoLSOM  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


EXbrook  2-6100 

KINGAN  &  COMPANY 
Pork  Packers 


Fourth  and  Townsend  Sts. 
SAN   FRANCISCO,   CALIF. 


Page  36 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


DOYLE'S  TAVERN 

1199  CHURCH  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Buich  Bros. 


Established    1946 


TADICH  GRILL 

THE  ORIGINAL  COLD   DAY  RESTAURANT 

sutler   1-9754 

545   CLAY  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

C.  M.  MURPHY  OLDSMOBILE 
COMPANY 

OLDSMOBILE  SALES  AND  SERVICE 

425   Worcester   Avenue,   San   Francisco,  Calif. 
7255   Mission  Street,    Daly   City,   California 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF  A 

FRIEND 


THE  UPJOHN  COMPANY 

199  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SPROUSE  ■  REITZ  CO.,  INC. 

6400  MISSION  STREET 

DALY   CITY COLIFORNIA 

UNIVERSITY  CLUB 

POWELL  AND  CALIFORNIA  STREETS 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


SWIFT  -  Limited 

MEN'S  WEAR 

TWO  EIGHTY   POST  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


ing.  J'he  No  Sunshine  award  was  not 
awarded  on  account  the  sun  was  shining 
— as  it  always  does  at  the  Oakland 
matches.  The  Oscars  were  picked  up  by 
Royce  Tevis,  Goldon  McPherson  and 
Jack  McNamara.  And  next  match  we 
have  the  long  sought  after  turkey  shoot. 

Jack  Watkins  has  not  been  shooting 
too  long  but  is  now  trying  to  make  up 
his  mind  to  enter  the  cap  'n  ball  match 
as  he  has  an  old  cap  'n  bailer  his  grand- 
father used  to  shoot  about  100  years 
ago.  Our  advice  is  that  he  stay  with  his 
three  modern  guns  that  he  is  having 
trouble  with  and  let  the  100  year  model 
rest  on  its  laurels. 

Len  Engstrom  of  the  Alameda  Police 
Department  is  still  trying  to  figure  out 
where  that  10th  shot  of  his  went  in  the 
rapid  fire  string  of  the  .22  match.  Len 
insists  it's  on  the  target  and  MUST  be 
a  double  of  one  of  those  tens  he  has  but 
the  point  is  which  one  is  it?  No  one  can 
find  it  so  Len  goes  down  10  points, 
much  to  his  sorrow.  Such  is  the  rugged 
life  of  pistol  shooting. 

SCORES 

CF  Short  Course 

Master Grif  Thompson 289 

Expert E.  L.  Johnson 280 

Sharpshooter R.  J.   Murphy 284 

Marksman   1st Frank    Ramos 270 

Marksman  2nd F.     LaCraft 268 

Marksman   3rd H.  E.  Jenkins 256 

CF  Camp  Perry  Mateh 

Master Karl    Schaugaard 294 

Expert Jack    McNamara 291 

Sharpshooter F.  Fennessey  289 

Marksman  1st Fred    Biven 292 

Marksman  2nd J.   Magee  273 

Marksman  3rd H.    Bottini 272 

.22  National  Match 

Master Jack   Chaney 293 

Expert Hal  Fellows  288 

Sharpshooter Randy  McDermott 283 

Marksman   1st R.  Galloway  277 

Marksman  2nd ..R.   H.   Johnson 272 

Marksman  3rd ,T.  Harmon  259 

22  Camp  Perry  Match 

Master M.  Klipfel  299 

Expert E.  Johnson  295 

Sharpshooter J.    W.   Steele 292 

Marksman  1st D.   W.   Henery 288 

Marksman  2nd Ernest  Lum  280 

Marksman  3rd J.   Magee  279 

.45  National  Match 

Master Dick  Thomas 282 

Expert J.  E.  Green 276 

Sharpshooter ..Phil  Lander  262 

Marksman   1st  W.  F.  Martens 273 

Marksman  2nd J.   E.   Durst 274 

Marksman   3rd G.  Colville  250 

.Aggregate  Match 

Master Karl  Schaugaard  872 

Expert Hal  Fellows  849 

Sharpshooter M.  McVey 848 

Marksman   1st R.  P.  McDermott 823 

Marksman  2nd L.  Wilke  794 

Marksman  3rd H.  E.  Jenkins 780 

Scores 

1st  place— S.  F.  Police  Team  No.  1 1155 

2nd  place— Oakland  Pistol  Club  No.  1 1142 

3rd  place— Calif.  Hiway  Patrol  Team  1.1137 
4th  place— Calif  Hiway  Patrol  Team  2.1124 


CONSOLIDATED  MILLINERY 
COMPANY 

210  POST  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 
A  FRIEND 


ROBIN  J.  WHYBROW,  D.C. 

CHIROPRACTIC  ORTHOPEDICS 

1301    NINTH  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

DElaware    3-9922 

THE  SAPPHIRE 

Frank  Rogero    -    Curt  Robison 
COCKTAILS   .   .   .  LUNCHEON 

2888  SAN  BRUNO  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


PHYSICIANS  TELEPHONE 
EXCHANGE 

450  SUTTER  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


O.  A.  TALMAGE  COMPANY 

4330  CALIFORNIA   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


MR.  JOSEPH  URSINO 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

327  TOPEKA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FOSTER  &  VELLA 
CHEVRON  GAS  STATION 

4101    THIRD  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  37 


CArfield    19507 

GRIZZLY  BEAR  CLUB 

414    MASON  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Mission   7. 9981 

DUVALL'S  STUDIO  CLUB 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

309  COURTLAND   AVENUE 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PRospect    6. 5965 

PINE -JONES  MARKET 

1100    PINE   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JUniper   4-9813 

LODGE 

699  CHENERY  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

VAIencia    6-3444 

CRYSTAL  CLUB 

2491    MISSION   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YUkon   2-2844 

SUN  TAI  SAM  YUEN 

Jimmy   Wong.    Manager 
Best  in  Chinese  and  American  Food 

622  JACKSON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YUkon   2-3640 

ARGONAUT  INSURANCE 
EXCHANGE 

WORKMEN'S  COMPENSATION  INSURANCE 

210  SANSOME    STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SUtter    1-3721 

INTRUSION  -  PREPAKT,  INC. 

CONTRACTORS 

607    MARKET   STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Midnight  Manhunt 

(l.'iinlinuiJ  Iriim  pai/r  /5; 

Catching  the  stolen  car  was  easy.  1  he 
handits  had  not  been  suspicious  of  the 
pri\ate  automobile  which  followed  in 
their  wake.  Carrozzi  pulled  abreast  of 
them  in  the  500  block  of  Girard  Street, 
then  turned  in  sharply.  Brakes  squealed, 
the  bandit  driver  cursed  and  the  stolen 
car  came  to  an  abrupt  stop  by  the  curb. 

The  officer  leaped  from  his  car,  gun 
drawn,  and  moved  toward  the  fugitives. 

"All  right,"  he  ordered.  "Come  out 
of  there  with  your  hands  up.  Don't  try 
any  funny  business." 

Carrozzi  know  it  was  a  touchy  situa- 
tion. One  policeman  with  two  gun  happy 
bandits  is  alwa\s  pla>ing  the  short  end 
of  the  odds,  even  if  he  does  have  the  drop 
on  them  for  the  moment.  He  stayed  well 
clear  of  the  car  while  he  waited  for  the 
two  men  to  unload. 


Lieutenant  Martin  Lee 

The  man  in  the  passenger's  seat  opened 
the  door,  then  lifted  his  hands  high  in 
the  air  and  stepped  out.  The  driver 
mo\ed  slower.  He  gazed  at  the  officer 
with  surly,  disgusted  eyes,  then  shuffled 
toward  the  sidewalk.  Carrozzi  watched 
him  warily,  knowing  he  could  cause 
trouble. 

"Get  your  hands  up  where  I  can  see 
them,  "  he  ordered. 

The  airman  leaned  low,  half  doubled 
over  as  though  he  was  sick. 

"I'll  get  'em  up,"  he  muttered. 

Still  in  a  crouch  the  airman  brought 
his  hands  into  view,  moving  fast,  striking 
with  the  deadly  speed  and  precision  of  a 
rattlesnake.  Carrozzi  caught  the  gleam 
of  the  barrel  of  the  twenty-five  too  late 


Phone  WAlnul    1-4141 

CERCIAT  FRENCH   LAUNDRY 
AND   DRY  CLEANERS 

102S  McAllister  street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ORdway   3-8338 

American-Italian  Delicatessen 

2217   POLK  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


TIBBY 


PEE   WEE 


SPIVEY 


TIPSY'S  COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 


CArfield    1-0SS4 
556   BROADWAY 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


ROWLANDS  CHEVRON   SERVICE 

HAIGHT   AND    BAKER   STREETS 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FAY'S  CLUB 

Fay   Latter 

"THE    PLACE   WHERE   FRIENDS   MEET" 

506    HAYES   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


ECK'S  WHIST  PARLOR 

24TH  AND  MISSION  STREETS 

SAN    FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ROUMBANIS  MARKET 

James  N.  Roubanis     -     Anthony  J.  Hanges 

611    BUSH   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FREDERICK'S  PAINT  SHOP 

AUTO   PAINTING   AND   BODY   REBUILDING 

1700  MARIPOSA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  38 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


RATHJEN   BROTHERS,  INC. 

We   Recommend 

YELLOWSTONE   BOTTLED  IN   BOND 

Kentuck   Straisrhl   Boubon   Whiskey 

THIRD   AND   BERRY   STREETS 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Mission    7-0862 

ENTERPRISE  ENGINE  AND 
MACHINERY  COMPANY 

A  Subsidiary   of  General  Metals  Corp. 

18th  &  Florida  Streets 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

sutler    1-2956 


MARINE  COOKS  &  STEWARDS. 
A.   F.  of  L. 

100   FIRST   STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


CLUB  CHI  CHI 

Best    of  Mixed    Drinks 
ENTERTAINMENT 

467   BROADWAY 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


George  M.  Philpott  Company 

CONTRACTORS'   SUPPLIES 

1060  BRYANT  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

EL  PRADO 

ONE   OF  SAN   FRANCISCO'S   MOST 
DISTINCTIVE    RESTAURANTS 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


WEsi    1-3058 

WEBSTER  NURSING  HOME 

930  BRODERICK   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WEst    1-822: 

NAMIEMON  SPECIALTIES 

1482  ELLIS   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


to  do  anything  about  it.  The  little  gun 
spoke  in  an  angry,  snapping  voice,  belch- 
ing as  it  did  so.  Then  it  was  the  officer's 
turn  to  double  over  as  a  mighty  leaden 
fist,  moving  at  better  than  1900  feet  a 
second,  caught  him  just  below  the  belt. 
Four  more  bullets  sprayed  from  the  air- 
man's gun  before  he  turned  and  darted 
down  Girard  Street  in  the  wake  of  his 
companion. 

Carrozzi  lifted  his  own  weapon  and 
the  heavy  throated  voice  of  the  thirty- 
eight  roared  a  defiant  answer  to  the  light- 
er pistol.  The  officer  emptied  his  weapon 
at  the  fleeing  figures  but  distance  and 
darkness  spoiled  his  aim.  The  bandits 
disappeared  around  a  corner. 

Every  now  and  then  a  wounded  man 
behaves  with  courage  and  fortitude  which 
amazes  the  physicians  who  work  on  him. 
Carrozzi  did  that  night.  Conscious  of 
considerable  pain,  but  having  no  idea  of 
how  badly  he  was  hit,  the  officer  strug- 
gled to  his  feet  and  looked  around,  taking 
a  moment  or  so  to  get  his  bearings.  He 
noticed  the  porch  lights  at  524  Girard 
Street  had  flicked  on  soon  ofter  the  shoot- 
ing and  headed  in  that  direction. 


Inspector  Tom  Cahill 

Louis  Scurini  and  his  family  had  all 
been  awakened  immediately  by  the  shoot- 
ing. He  answered  the  doorbell  at  once 
when  Carrozzi  rang. 

"Come  on  it,  Officer,"  he  urged. 

"Have  you  got  a  telephone?"  Carrozzi 
inquired. 

"Right  at  the  head  of  the  stairs.  Can 
you  make  it?" 

"Sure,  Carrozzi  told  him.  "I'm  all 
right." 

The  big  policeman  moved  slowly  to 
the  top  of  the  stairs  and  found  the  tele- 
phone.  He  called  Potrero  station. 


NATIONAL  WOODEN   BOX 
ASSOCIATION 

Pacific    Division 
SS   NEW  MONTGOMERY   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HOLIDAY  GREETINGS  FROM 
A  FRIEND 


J.  H.  BAXTER  CO. 

200  BUSH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ALLIS-CHALMERS  COMPANY 

650   HARRISON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DOuglas   2-0678 

Haas  and  Haynie  Construction 
Company 

275  PINE   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SKyline    1-5094 

LAWRENCE  RYAN 

PLUMBING   CONTRACTORS 

717    -   31ST  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALlFOR^i'A 

THE  TABLET  AND  TICKET  CO. 

BUILDING     DIRECTORIES      -      CHANGEABLE 

LETTER  SIGNS  -  LABELS,  EMBOSSED  TAGS, 

ADVERTISING   SPECIALTIES 

425   BUSH  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CArficId    1-3300 

THE  WILSHIRE  LOUNGE 

359   GRANT  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  39 


BUDDAH   BAR 

901    Grant   Avenue  SUtter   1-9292 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MATHEWS  &  LIVINGSTON 

310   Sansome   Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SWALLOW  PRINTING  COMPANY 


"Swift  as  a  Swallow" 
349  Clay  Street 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


A.  LEVY  &  J.  ZENTNER  CO. 

Receivers  -  Jobbers  -  Distributors 
FRUIT  AND  VEGETABLES 

P  O.  Box  2129.  Station  B 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


SWETT  &  CRAWFORD 

INSURANCE 

100   Sansome   Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FREEDOM-VALVOLINE  OIL  CO. 

Since   1866 
"The  Original  Pennsylvania  Oil" 

1300  Seventeenth  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


M  &  M  MOTORS 

679   Valencia   Street  KLondike   2-2S33 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


LEE  PRICE 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


"This  is  Carrozzi,"  he  declared.  "I'm 
at  524  Girard  Street.  I  spotted  those 
two  men  who  pulled  the  San  Bruno  Ave- 
nue holdup  and  ran  them  down.  Oiie_of 
them  shot  me.  Then  they  escaped  on 
foot.  They  must  still  be  in  the  area 
somewhere.  Send  some  help.  Quick. 
And  send  me  an  ambulance.  I've  got  a 
bullet  in  me." 

Carrozzi  turned  to  his  host.  "I've 
ne\er  been  shot  before,"  he  declared.  "It 
doesn't  feel  so  good." 

He  pulled  his  tunic  open  and  stared 
at  the  blood  which  was  spreading  slowly 
across  his  shirt  and  trousers.  "\  ou  know, 
I  thought  I  got  the  bullet  in  my  belt.  It 
hit  me  so  hard  it  knocked  me  down.  But 
I  got  hit  all  right.   I  got  hit  good." 

Scurini  lead  his  guest  to  a  comfortable 
chair.  Carrozzi  continued  to  talk  ration- 
ally and  calmly.  The  sound  of  sirens  in 
the  distance  told  him  that  his  fellow  offi- 
cers were  bracketing  the  area  with  blue 
uniforms. 

"I  hope  they  get  them,"  he  declared. 
"I  sure  hope  they  get  them." 

The  telephone  rang.  It  was  a  news- 
paperman asking  what  had  happened. 
AVhile  Scurini  tried  to  explain  Carrozzi 
lifted  himself  from  the  chair  and  took 
over.  He  outlined  the  incident  in  detail. 
Later  he  took  another  call  of  the  same 
nature. 

The  Scurini  family  gathered  around 
the  wounded  officer.  Carrozzi  ejected  a 
shell  case  from  his  service  revolver  and 
handed  it  to  eight-year-old  Jannette 
Scurini. 

"Here's  a  souvenir  for  you,"  he  de- 
clared. "Now  you'll  have  something  to 
show  the  kids  in  school." 

The  ambulance  from  Alission  Emer- 
gency Hospital  seemed  to  be  dragging  its 
feet.  Carrozzi  rose  from  his  chair  and 
went  downstairs  to  see  what  was  holding 
things  up.  Nothing  was  in  sight.  He 
climbed  the  stairs  again,  moving  slower 
than  ever.  The  pallor  on  his  face  had  in- 
creased. He  was  turning  a  pale,  pasty 
gray.   Scurini  noticed  it. 

"You've  gotta  sit  down  officer.  You've 
just  got  to." 

Carrozzi  sighed  wearily.  "OK,  I'll 
sit  down." 

A  few  minutes  later  the  ambulance  ar- 
rived and  carted  the  amazing  six  foot, 
200-pound  plus  officer  to  the  surgery 
tables  of  the  San  Francisco  hospital. 
Plasma  was  the  first  thing  he  needed. 
The  big  officer  had  lost  a  lot  of  blood. 


Western  Life  Insurance  Co. 

Ted   Collins,  Supt.  of  Agencies 

47    Kearny    Street  EXbrook   2-1913 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


TRADING  POST 

ANTIQUE  AND   MODERN   FIREARMS 

SOS    Divisadero   Street  Fillmore   6-7654 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Mission   7-0236 

GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER  CO. 

STOVES    -    REFRIGERATORS    -    WASHERS 
IRONERS    -    WATER  HEATERS 

Mission  Street  at  Eighteenth 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


RITZ  CLUB 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

212  Eddy   Street  GRaystone  4-9790 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

FORBIDDEN  CITY  CLUB 

FINEST  IN  CHINESE  FOODS  AND 
ENTERTAINMENT  .      .  FLOOR  SHOW 

363   Sutter   Street 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


EMBASSY  ROOM 

584  Turk  Street  PRospect  5-9954 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


GOLDEN  WEST  IRON  WORKS 

TECO   PRODUCTS 

946   EI   Camino    Real 

SOUTH   SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MISSION   BELL  MOTEL 

110  Cottages    -    70  Kitchenettes 

15  Minutes   from  City   Center 

A  Good  Place  to  Stay  While  Visiting 

San  Francisco 

6843  Mission  Street 
DALY  CITY  CALIFORNIA 


Page  40 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  J  a 


1953 


TRIAhSGLE  CONDUIT  AND 
CABLE  CO.,  INC. 

6S6   TOWNSEND   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


Since    185S 

SUTRO  &  CO. 

407    MONTGOMERY   STREET 


SAN    FRANCISCO   4 


CALIFORNIA 


THE  LETTER  SHOP 

214   Mission   Street  EXbrook   2-6560 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


HANK'S  JEWELRY  AND 
WATCH   SHOP 

1712    Polk   Street  ORdway   3-8717 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


RAY  &  JOE'S  SERVICE 

2995   Irving   Street  SEabright    1-9936 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


COMPUMENTS  OF 

RUCKER- FULLER  CO. 


SCHRAMM,  INC. 

Manufacturers   Air  Compressors     -     Tools 

1315   Howard  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  sutler   1-9625 


527  CLUB  -  Bar  and   Restaurant 

DOMESTIC  AND   IMPORTED   LIQUORS 
Pabst   on   Tap 

Joe   Fuchslin  and  Carl  Reichmulh,  Proprietors 

527    Bryant   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Meanwhile,  back  along  Bayshore 
Houlexard  and  Silver  Avenue,  the  search 
for  the  gunmen  continued  and  expanded. 
Every  available  man  in  the  Ingleside  and 
Potrero  districts  was  rushed  to  the  scene. 
Carloads  of  men  arrived  from  the  Hall 
of  Justice  and  spread  themselves  through 
the  gloom.    Traffic  men  joined  the  chase. 

Chief  of  Inspectors  James  English  ar- 
rived to  direct  the  manhunt  personally. 
Inspector  Frank  Ahern,  square  jawed, 
grim  faced  and  angry  appeared  to  assist. 
Lieutenant  Marty  Lee  of  the  Robbery 
Detail — calm,  confident  and  efficient — 
was  summoned  to  direct  a  portion  of  the 
chase. 

Spot  lights,  probing  the  shadows,  prod- 
ding the  recessed  dorways,  swept  down 
dark  alleys.  Slashlights  flickered  in  the 
darkness.  Prowl  car  radios  growled, 
sputtered  and  disgorged  information  in 
static  splattered  sentences.  Patrolmen  on 
foot  moved  methodically  from  house  to 
house  and  street  to  street,  investigating 
each  shadow. 

The  manhunt  continued.  An  hour 
passed  and  then  another.  Chief  English, 
who  had  gathered  his  aides  around  him 
in  Mission  Emergency  Hospital,  ex- 
changed worried  glances  with  his  men. 
1  he  area  was  bracketed,  blocked  off.  But 
it  was  large  and  the  quarry  was  small.  A 
needle  in  a  haystack.  Two  men.  Two 
men  loose  in  a  district  as  large  as  many 
medium  sized  cities. 

Robbery  Inspector  George  Heeg  had 
joined  the  group.  Tom  Cahill  of  homi- 
cide was  there.  John  O'Haire,  also  of 
homicide  was  present.  They  studied  the 
incoming  reports  and  tried  to  fit  them 
into  and  intelligent  patern. 

Meanwhile  the  patrolmen  moved  on. 
Methodically  and  slowly  now,  in  an  ever 
narrowing  circle. 

Three  ten  A.M.  Seventy-one  year 
old  Louis  Sechini  arose  at  his  home  at 
437  Goettingen  Street  and  prepared  to 
leave  for  work.  Louis  is  a  produce  work- 
er and  men  who  labor  in  the  commission 
market  get  up  early.  Sechini  moved 
quietly.  His  daughter  and  her  husband, 
Frank  DeMartini  and  their  two  children 
were  still  asleep.  To  make  things  easier 
he  went  to  the  basement  to  shine  his 
shoes.   He  switched  on  the  light. 

"Keep  quiet  or  we'll  kill  you!" 

Sechini  caught  his  breath.  A  gunman 
moved  from  behind  the  family  car,  pistol 
leveled  at  the  elderly  man.  The  second 
bandit  appeared  from  his  hiding  place  un- 
der the  car.  His  gun  was  also  drawn. 

"AVhat  the  hell  are  you  doing  here?" 
Sechini  inquired  angrily. 


FRANKS  OF  CHINATOWN 

555   Grant   Avenue  GArfield    1-9949 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


MERCURY  PARCEL  AND 
DRAYAGE  SERVICE 

385  Ninth  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


R.  M.  TAPPING  LETTER  SHOP 

580  Market  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


JAMES  LEES  AND  SONS 
COMPANY 

1525   Bayshore  Boulevard 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WESTWOOD  HOMES,  INC. 

205   Granada    Street  JUniper   7-2340 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

A.  L.  LEARNER  TRUCK  SALES 

G.M.C.   TRUCK  SALES 

350  Eighth  Street  MArket   1-7618 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Compliments  of 
A     F  R  I  EN  D 


i 


SCHLAGE  LOCK  COMPANY 

2201    Bayshore   Blvd.  De  3-1100 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  41 


BAXTER  TRADING  COMPANY 

IMPORT    -    EXPORT 
Cable  Address:  "BAXCO" 

416   Jackson  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


White  House   French  Laundry 

J.   p.   Cassou 

2S49   Clay   Street  WEst    1-8073 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

DOuglas    2-6987 

EMMETT  F.   McCARREN 

CUSTOM  BROKER 

WHEELER  AND   MILLER 

Customs   Broker    -     Freight  Forwarders 

409  Washington   Street,  Room  7 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


GOODALL   RUBBER  CO. 

398    Fifth    Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

Phones:  EXbrook  2-8179     -    MArket    1-3889 

Williams  Welding   Service 

ALUMINUM  AND  MAGNESIUM  SPECIALISTS 
Consulting  Service    -    Design  and  Engineering 

47  Shipley  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

Telephone:  HEmlock    I -187  I 

Kwik  Frozen  Products,   Inc. 

Gilbert   G.    Lazzari 

FROZEN  SPECIALTY  MEATS 
BEEF    -    PORK    -    VEAL 

334  South   Van   Ness   Avenue 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

Compliments   of 

HELLER.  EHRMAN.  WHITE 
AND  McAULIFFE 

14  MONTGOMERY   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


Compliments  of 
A     FRIEND 


"Keep  quiet  or  we'll  kill  \ou,"  the 
bandit  repeated. 

"What  do  you  want?" 

'The  keys  to  the  car.  Where  are 
they?" 

"I  haven't  got  them,"  Sechini  replied. 
"The  car  keys  are  upstairs." 

Frank  DeMartini  had  been  half  awak- 
ened when  his  father-in-law  got  up.  The 
sound  of  the  older  man's  angry  voice  fil- 
tered through  his  semi-slumber,  and  he 
arose  to  see  what  had  happened.  The 
bandits  had  just  asked  about  the  keys 
when  he  entered. 

"\Vhat's  going  on  here,  anyway?"  he 
demanded. 

Sechini  whirled  toward  the  doorway. 
"Get  out  of  the  way,  Frank,"  he  ordered. 

But  DeMartini  was  already  in  the  cel- 
lar. One  of  the  bandits  covered  him  with 
his  gun. 

"Keep  your  hands  up  and  keep  quiet," 
he  said. 

DeMartini  took  a  step  back,  then 
stopped.  The  airmen  looked  at  each  other 
questioningly,  cursed,  and  then  retreated 
through  the  back  door.  DeAIartini  raced 
toward  the  telephone. 

The  call  to  communications,  which 
was  immediately  relayed  to  Captain  Eng- 
lish, was  the  first  real  break  in  the  man- 
hunt. 

"I  hey  were  just  in  our  basement,  " 
DeMartini  reported.  "I  think  I  can  hear 
them  climbing  to  the  roof.'' 

Captain  English  and  his  crew  rolled 
with  sirens  screaming  down  Bayshore 
Boulevard.  Meanwhile  Potrero  Station 
policemen  caught  fleeting  glimpses  of  the 
two  bandits  who  had  somewhow  clam- 
bered to  the  roof  of  the  DeMartini  house 
and  scampered  over  a  row  of  houses  in 
the  direction  of  the  Grace  Lutheran 
Church. 

Meanwhile  a  cocker  spaniel  barked  in 
frantic  indignation. 

Two  carloads  of  emergency  officers  in- 
cluding Leo  Osuna,  ^Valter  Kracke,  Al 
Gordon,  Art  Hagstrom  and  George  Eng- 
ler  coiuerged  on  the  scene.  The  uniform- 
ed policemen  drew  their  net  in  tight. 
Frank  Ahern  pulled  up  in  front  of  the 
church  and  found  Reverend  Byron  P. 
Wallschlaeger,  the  pastor. 

"My  little  dog  has  been  barking,"  the 
minister  reported.  "I  think  there  may  be 
someone  on  the  roof.  He's  pretty  excited." 

He  had  not  finished  talking  when 
Osuna  and  Kracke  made  a  simultaneous 
discovery. 

"Hev,  there  they  are,"  the  officers 
shouted.    "On  the  roof  of  the  church." 

Spotlights  pierced  the  darkness  illumi- 
nating the  fugitives.  A  tiny  tongue  of 
flame  gickered  defiantly  as  a  gunman 
opened   fire  on   the  lot  of  officers.  The 


Residence:  156  -  2nd  Avenue    -    EV  6-6404 


HAL'S  BARBER  SHOP 

Harold   L.   Morrison 
YOU'LL  FEEL  UKE   NEW 

208  Clement  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone   LOmbard   4-2360 

VOGUE   REWEAVING  STUDIO 

Burns   -   Tears   -   Moth    Holes    -   Stains   -   Cuts   in 

Garments,  Rugs  and  Upholstered  Furniture 

Rewoven   by   Hand. 

1143  Taraval  Street,  Near  22nd  Avenue 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

MAJOR   FRED   N.  WIGGIN 

85   HEATHER  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COURTNEY'S  RICHFIELD  SERVICE 

GEARY  AT  ARGUELLO   BOULEVARD 
Evergreen    6-9742 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HEmlock   1-3680    -     1-3681       ENterprise    1-0062 

W  R  E  S  C  O 

wholesale  Radio   and   Electric   Supply   Co. 

Authorized    Distributor 

"RCA  Tubes    -    Parts    -    Test  Equipment 

Batteries" 

140   Ninth   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


MAX  JACKSON   &   SONS 

INSURANCE 

461    Market  Street  YUkon  2-2494 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


PACIFIC   FELT  COMPANY 

710  York  Street  Mission  7-0111 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


METAPHYSICAL  LIBRARY  AND 
BOOK   SHOP 

85    Post   Street  YUkon   6-6145 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  42 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  195 ^ 


B  &  W  TRUCKING  AND 
EXPRESS 

2335  Clement  Street  BAyview   1-2061 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


ST.  MARY'S  HOSPITAL 

Hayes   and  Stanyan  Street 
Phone  SKyline   1-2112 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

SMITH  &  CRAWFORD 

wholesalers 
ELECTRONIC  PARTS 

1345  Mission   Street  UN   1-5206 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


ARLIN   HOTEL 

2186    Union   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

LESLIE  GORRELL 

Proven  Answers   to  Your  Association's 

Financial   Problems 

HOW   TO   RAISE   FUNDS 

At  No  Added  Cost  to  Your  Members 

No  Obligation  for  Complete  Information 

420   Market   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


JAMES  HURST  CO. 

REAL  ESTATE 

155   Montgomery   St.  Phone    SUtter   1-8456 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


THE  TUX  -  Cocktofis 

Phone   UNderhill   1-7064 
1204   Market  Street,   Opposite   WhJtcomb    Hotel 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


ELMORE'S  AUTO  REPAIRING 

IBS   Twelfth   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


policemen  lunged  for  the  cover  of  their 
cars,  then  returned  fire.  The  net  spread 
tight  around  the  lofty  building.  Patrol- 
men focused  their  flashlights  on  the  roof 
and  advanced,  guns  drawn  and  ready  for 
instant  use. 

Osuna  and  Kracke  moved  forward, 
scaled  an  eight-foot  wire  fence  and  drop- 
ped into  the  backyard.  Almost  before 
they  knew  what  was  happening  they  rea- 
lized they  had  company. 

One  of  the  bandits  was  squatting  in 
the  yard,  desperately  trying  to  bury  the 
holdup  money  and  his  gun. 

Kracke  leveled  his  thirty-eight  at  the 
airman. 

"Come  out  with  your  hands  up  or  I'll 
let  you  have  it,"  he  ordered. 

The  suspect,  hands  aloft,  moved  for- 
ward under  the  flashlight  beam.  He  sur- 
rendered without  further  struggle. 

While  Osuna  and  Kracke  captured  the 
fugitive,  Frank  Ahern  sought  a  route  to 
the  church  roof.  He  found  it  at  319 
Bacon  Street.  Leading  Officers  Engler, 
Robert  Dennison  and  George  Ferris,  he 
moved  through  the  house  to  the  roof. 
A  four-foot  gap  separated  the  policeman 
from  the  church  roof. 

"We  can  jump  that,"  Ahearn  decided. 

"Easy,"  one  of  the  officers  agreed. 

One  by  one  the  four  officers  leaped 
from  the  residence  to  the  church.  From 
there  on  it  was  easy.  The  defiant  bandit 
had  lost  his  nerve.  He  crouched,  empty 
handed,  beside  a  cornice.  His  gun  lay  on 
the  tar  paper  a  few  feet  away. 

"Don't  shoot,  I'll  give  up,"  he  said. 

"You  bet  you'll  come,"  Ahern  replied. 
He  turned  and  called  to  the  officers  on 
the  street. 

"Somebody  send  for  a  fire  truck,  will 
you,"  he  called.  "I  need  a  ladder  to  get 
this  fellow  down  with." 

The  manhunt  was  over.  Later  that 
night  the  two  bandits  were  identified  as 
Judge  Lombard  and  Nathan  Nichols, 
both  airmen  stationed  at  Hamilton  Air 
Force  base.  A  complete  confession  of 
each  detail  of  their  crime  spree  followed. 

Every  San  Francisco  officer  who  reads 
this  magazine  knows  by  now  that  Car- 
rozzi  will  recover.  His  constitution  was 
as  tough  as  his  disposition.  His  fellow 
officers  will  be  working  with  him  during 
the  months  and  years  to  come.  And  his 
courageous  action  will  not  soon  be  for- 
gotten. 

And  the  bandits  ?  They  have  tempo- 
rary quarters  in  the  San  Francisco 
County  Jail  while  they  await  trial.  Later 
on  they  will  take  up  residence  in  rooms 
which  have  been  reserved  for  them  up  the 
bay  apiece.  Right  close  to  Hamilton  Air 
Force  Base  in  fact.  But  in  spite  of  this 
it  is  considered  highly  unlikely  that  they 
will  feel  at  home.   Not  right  away. 


WING  SING  CHONG  CO. 

IMPORTER  AND   EXPORTER 
GROCERIES    -    WINES    -    UQUORS 

1076  Stockton  Street  YUkon  2-4171 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


\ 


W.  C.     TAIT 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

2300  Mason  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


ARTHUR  A.  HYMAN 

300  MONTGOMERY  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 

E.  CLEMENS  HORST  CO. 

235  PINE  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


COAST  LINE  TRUCK 
SERVICE.  INC. 

WATSONVILLE,  CALIFORNIA 


J.  B.  KING  COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS 

231    Franklin  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


NATIONAL  CASH   REGISTER 
COMPANY 


SAN    FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNA 


ECK'S  WHIST  CLUB 

Enjoy  Whist  With  Us  Every  Afternoon  and 
Evening,   Except   Wednesdays 

3316  24th  Street  Mission  7-99S2 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


i 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  43 


GOLD   STAR  LIQUOR  STORE 

1199' 2   McAllister   Street  JOrdan    7-0303 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

A.  E.  HANSON 

SELF-SERVICE  LAUNDRY 

1835   Divisadero   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Joe  Jung's  Indo  China  Restaurant 

263   O'Farrell   Street  DOuglas   2-6706 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WING  SUN 

FUNERAL  DIRECTOR 
17    Brenham    Place  YUkon   2-0719 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Beaux  Arts   French   Laundry 

3-Day    Service  or  Special    1-Day 

607  Geary  Street  ORday  3-4306 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SEQUOIA  HOTEL 

174   Third   Street  EXbrook  2-9803 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COLONIAL  UPHOLSTERING  SHOP 

FURNITURE   MADE   TO   ORDER 
2228   Lombard   Street  Fillmore   6-7793 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  ROSEMONT  TAVERN 

903  Valencia  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  BRISTOL 

E.  L.  Taft,   Manager 

WEEKLY  AND   PERMANENT  RATES 

56    Mason   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

The  White  House  Cleaners  and 
Dyers 

"The  House  of  Quality  and  Service" 
174  Fourteenth  Street  HEmlock   )-047S 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

GET  YOUR   KICKS  AT  THE 

HOUSE  OF  NIX 

1135   Ocean   Avenue 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ZEBRA  SNACK  BAR 

Miss  Lucille  Pettit 
4102  GEARY   BOULEVARD 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WINTER  HARDWARE 

429  San   Anselmo   Street 

SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

S.  &  W.  Machinery  &  Supply 

PIER  No.3,  EMBARCADERO 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Personal  Identification 

(Conthiuiii  from   pacic  17 J 

society,  but,  despite  numerous  and  offera- 
tory  manifestations,  the  directors  of 
American  public  welfare  were  apathetic. 
However,  the  Hertillon  novelty  was  loud- 
ly acclaimed  by  those  in  power,  with  the 
fine  unreason  of  witless  sheep  aping  some 
freakish  antic  of  their  bellwether;  and 
eventually,  anthopometry  gained  foothold 
in  another  unsuspecting  territory. 

Bertillion  File  Compiled 

Bertillon's  book,  "Signaletic  Instruc- 
tions," published  in  English  in  1896,  con- 
tains the   following  prideful  statement: 

"It  (the  Bertillon  System)  was  intro- 
duced into  the  United  States  in  1887  by 
Major  R.  W.  McClaughry  (then  war- 
den of  the  Illinois  State  Penitentiary  at 
Joliet.  and  Secretary  of  the  United  States 
and  Canada  Warden's  Association)  to 
whose  attention  it  was  brought  by  the 
chief  of  that  institution,  the  late  Gallus 
Muller.  Shortly  afterward,  it  was  offi- 
cially endorsed  by  the  Warden's  Associa- 
tion .  .  .  and  at  the  present  time,  there 
are  in  the  United  States  nearly  twenty 
prisons  and  reformatories  and  at  least 
seven  police  departments,  which  are  mak- 
ing use  of  it  to  some  extent." 

As  early  as  1896,  the  International  As- 
sociation of  Chiefs  of  Police  had  set  up 
a  Bertillon  file  at  Chicago,  compiled  from 
the  records  furnished  by  enforcement 
agencies  throughout  the  entire  country. 
Incidentally,  this  was  the  first  bureau  of 
identification  with  a  national  scope  to  be 
created  in  the  United  States.  It  also  is 
an  important  circumstance  that  these  rec- 
ords were  later  removed  to  Washington, 
D.  C,  to  become  the  nucleus  of  the  Na- 
tional Police  Bureau  of  Identification, 
which  had  its  birthplace  in  an  office  over 
the  National  Bank  of  AVashington,  at 
7th  and  D  Streets,  N.W.  Washington, 
D.  C,  with  Eugene  Van  Buskirk  in 
charge  as  superintendent. 

When  fingerprinting  was  finally  adopt- 
ad,  digital  records  also  were  forwarded 
by  the  many  police  officers  of  the  United 
States,  and  not  by  the  Federal  Govern- 
ment, as  popular  misinformation  has  fre- 
quently contended. 

Rogues  Gallery  Expands 
Some  extenuation  for  Bertillon's  readv 
acceptance  in  the  L^nited  States  is  found 
in  the  haphazard  identification  procedures 
current  at  the  time.  The  "Rogues  Gal- 
lery" instituted  in  San  Francisco  by  Cap- 
tain Lees  in  1854,  pioneered  similar 
methods,  which  were  employed  in  1875 
by  Inspector  Thomas  Byrnes,  Chief  of 
Detectives  in  the  New  York  City  Police 
Department.  Recognized  as  a  world  fig- 
ure in  the  enforcement  field,  the  achieve- 


WHITCOMB  TRAVEL  SERVICE 

1231    Market   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WILLIAM   SANFORD 

EXHIBITS  AND   DISPLAYS 

657    Harrison    Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

IDEAL  PAINT  &  WALL  PAPER  CO. 

2200  Lombard  Street,  Corner  Steiner 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WILBAR   HOTEL 

328    Fourth    Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

McGRAW  BROTHERS 

PRESCRIPTION  PHARMACISTS 

6300   Mission   Street 
DALY  CITY  CALIFORNIA 

YOUNG  REPUBLIC  LAUNDRY 

517  ARGUELLO  BOULEVARD 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Y  O  U   N  G"  S 

LAUNDRY  AND   CLEANERS 

193   Valencia    Street  KLondike   2-3024 

Near   Duboce  Avenue 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YOUNG  CHINA  NEWSPAPER 

Mr.    S.    S.    Fong 

881    Clay    Street  YUkon   2-2651 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HENRY  SEWING  SHOP 

Mr.  and    Mrs.   Henry  Chu 
1038  Powell  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


GEORGE'S  FOUNTAIN 

303  CLEMENT  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

George  A.  Karros  Sandwich  Shop 

Mr.   and    Mrs.   George   Karros 
932A  MORKET  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Zouaounis   Brothers   Five-Mile 
Market 

3574  SAN  BRUNO  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

VIENNA  GROCERY 

799   Vienna   Street  DEIaware   3-59S5 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  CHINESE  TIMES 

119   Waverly   Place  YUkon   2-0136 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  44 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  19S3 


Peerlite  Manufacturing  and 
Supply  Co. 

178   Fifth   Street  SUtter    1-0S50 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MISSSON  VILLAGE  CLUB 

2000   Mission   Street  MArket    1-8138 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  DRAGON'S  GATE 

FINEST  CHINESE  CUISINE 

850    Kearny   Street  YUkon   2-3926 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JAMES  MARKET 

GROCERIES    -    BEER    -    LIQUORS 

3100  California   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  BOSTON 

452   Folsom   Street  GArfield    1-9956 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN  EAGLE  LUNCH 

SPANISH  AND  ITALIAN  FOOD 
400    Broadway 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


Seventeenth  Street  Restaurant 

1233   -    17th    Street  UNderhill    3-9717 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Romeo's  Fruit,  Fish  and  Vegetable 
Market 

GROCERIES.   FRESH  AND   DRIED  FRUITS 
5216  Third  Street  ATwater  2-8466 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JUSTICE  HOTEL 

640   Clay   Street  YUyon   2-0735 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


MARINA  BOWL 

FOR   RELAXATION  AND   FUN 

1725   Filbert    Street  GR   4-9937 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


NEV\^  CONTINENTAL  HOTEL 

127    Ellis    Street  YUkon    6-0464 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

RIVA  ITALIAN   RESTAURANT 

180  Church   Street  HEmlock    1-5739 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WONG  &  HOW  RESTAURANT 

CHINESE   FOOD 
404    Kearny    Street 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


FRANKLIN   HOTEL 

1380   Sutter   Street  TUxedo   S-9734 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


nients  of  Byrnes  in  criminal  photography 
surpassed  those  of  Captain  Lees,  who  had 
been  handicapped  by  hick  both  of  funds 
and  cooperation.  In  1886,  Byrnes  pub- 
lished a  sizeable  text  entitled  "Profes- 
sional Criminals  in  America,"  in  which 
he  described  a  large  number  of  current 
offenders,  and  included  several  hundred 
photographs,  a  work  suggesting,  but  far 
from  comparable  with  that  of  Oloriz 
Aquilera. 

Byrnes  later  included  descriptions  of 
the  Bertillon  system,  and  published  an 
enlarged  and  revised  edition  of  his  book 
in  1895,  which,  in  that  era  of  horsecars 
and  gaslight,  enforcement  officers  of 
America,  and  of  Europe  as  well,  found 
to  be  of  considerable  utility.  But  inter- 
national criminals  and  local  lawbreakers 
also  were  both  numerous  and  active,  and 
more  effective  weapons  were  sorely 
needed. 

Thus  Bertillon's  anthropometry  came 
as  an  emergency  measure  in  dire  extrem- 
ity ;  however,  it  is  regretable  that  popu- 
lar selection  made  such  a  choice  with 
fingerprinting  not  only  available,  but 
also  convincingly  advocated  by  progres- 
sive intellects  possessing  the  foresight  to 
appreciate  its  advantage. 

Bertillon  System  Spreads 

Once  rooted  in  American  soil,  anthro- 
pometry throve  with  timely  blossoming 
in  all  important  centers.  The  Chicago 
police  department  countenanced  its  em- 
ployment in  1888  at  the  insistence  of 
Captain  Michael  P.  Evans,  and  its  was 
used  in  Illinois  State  Reformatory  in 
1889  by  a  J.  Reno,  one  of  Evans'  stu- 
dents. New  York  officially  sanctioned 
Bertillon's  method  September  1,  1896, 
and  was  still  addicted  to  its  use  in  1903, 
when  Captain  James  H.  Parke,  of  the 
New  York  State  Prison  Department, 
vainly  petitioned  the  U.  S.  Immigration 
Service  to  adopt  fingerprinting.  The  offi- 
cial reply  was  "...  The  Bertillon  Sys- 
tem is  the  most  advantageous  for  the 
needs  of  this  Service." 

But  Captain  Parke  was  not  by  any 
means  a  lone  champion,  and  once  again 
the  subject  of  Dermatography  found  ap- 
preciative and  able  support  in  Dr.  Henr\' 
P.  de  Forest,  Ph.B.,  M.S.,  and  Fellow 
of  the  New  York  Academy  of  IMedicine. 
Here  was  a  second  Galton  with  percep- 
tion beyond  his  contemporaries  ;and  large- 
ly through  his  historic  efforts  were  the 
American  people  destined  once  again  to 
share  the  benefit  of  a  heritage  from  an- 
tiquity. 

For  some  time  prior  to  and  during  the 
year  1900,  the  New  York  Civil  Service 
Commission  had  been  encountering  diffi- 
culties with  the  numerous  applicants  for 


LAKESIDE  LIQUOR  STORE 

2188   Mission   Street  UNderhill   3-972S 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Blue   Bird   Cafe   and   Cocktail    Bar 

ITALIAN  DINNERS 
3149   -    22nd  Street  Mission  8-9793 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Green  Spot  Cocktail  Lounge 

1371   Grant  Avenue  EXbrook  2-9940 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MARINA  PASTRY 


2045   Chestnut   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


WAlnut    1-8020 

CALIFORNIA 


DANTE  BILLIARD  PARLOR 

521    Broadway  GArfield    1-9529 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


MOLER  BARBER  SCHOOL 

D.  E.   Brown,   Manager 


161    Fourth  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


GArfield    1-9979 

CALIFORNIA 


BIGHORN  TAVERN 


2898  -   1 6th  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


HEmlock  1-5718 

CALIFORNIA 


THE  TUX 

MIXED  DRINKS    -    COCKTAILS 
1204   Market   Street 


SAN    FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


MIAMI  BUFFET 

2722  SEVENEENTH  STEET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

W.  H.  AND  S.  SILLS 

PAINTING  CONTRACTOR 

241    Highland  Ave.  Diamond  3-7503 

BURLINGAME  CALIFORNIA 

THE  BARREL  INN 

139  ELLIS  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

VENETIAN   BAKING  COMPANY 

Italian  -  French  Bread  and  Rolls 


2200  Powell  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


DOuglas  2-2416 

CALIFORNIA 


BYRNE'S  LIQUOR  STORE 

"Right     Kind     of     Liquor     and     Beers — on     the 

Wrong^  Side  of  the  Track*;*' 
SELMA  CALIFORNIA 


THOMAS  CERAMICS 

2534   Newport    Blvd.  Beacon   5664-J 


COSTA   MESA 


CALIFORNIA 


1 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  45 


Phone  GReystone   4-9644 

STUDIO  LIQUORS 

Fine  Wines  and  Liquors    (Retail) 

Peter    Vellas 

468   Ellis    Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

MOnlrose  4-4909 

CANARY  LIQUOR  STORE 

Call  Us  For  Liquor  .  .  .  We  Deliver 

R.  Val  Ennis     -     R.  J.  Ennis 

31st   Avenue   and   Judah   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 


Zona-Lee  -  Children's  Garments 

199   Minna   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


REV.   D.  ZUNIO 

80   Santa    Rosa   Avenue 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

Zurich  Life   Ins.  Company 

417    Montgomery   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MICHAEL'S  TAVERN 

62  Taylor  Street  TUxedo  5-1277 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

Bay  Bridge  Emporium 


130   Valencia   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO 


UN   3-2928 

CALIFORNIA 


Appliance   Reconditioning 
Service  Co. 


3151    Scott   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO 


FI   6-2051 

CALIFORNIA 


MOLONY'S  PHARMACY 

16tli   and   Guerrero   Streets 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HENRY  M.  ZAIS 

COMPLETE   HOME    FURNISHERS 

Custom   Built  Upholstered   Furniture 

Furniture     -     Appliances 

849  Mission  Street  EXbrook  2-6512 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Haas  Wood  and   ivory  Works 

George    Haas     -     Carl    Haas 

64  Clementina  Street  Phone  GArfield   1-8273 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


L.  J.  LAZARUS 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


North  American  Accident  Ins.  Co. 

A.  J.   Carlson,   Field   Representative 

LIFE,   ACCIDENT  AND    HEALTH   INSURANCE 

Phones:  Office  DO  2-3295  -  Res.  LA  5-8537 

867    Phelan    Building 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SUTTER  TRAVEL  SERVICE 

Hotel   Lobby    -    Hotel   Sutter 

Air,  Rail,  Steamship,  Tours  .  .  .  Sightseeing 

Let    us    make    your    reservation    for    your    next 

hotel     stop.       Reservations     to     all     ski     resorts 

DOuglas   2-2680 
Sutter  &  Kearny  Sts.  San  Francisco.  Calif. 


civic  employment.  An  artful  subterfuge 
resorted  to  by  poorly  qualified  but  ambi- 
tious petitioners,  was  that  of  hiring  some 
vigorous  but  unscrupulous  impersonator 
to  take  the  required  tests,  and  thus  fraud- 
ulently attain  a  qualifying  e-\amination 
rating.  This  regrettable  practice  culmin- 
ated in  unsavory  scandal  when  some  of 
the  contestants,  even  after  dishonestly  se- 
curing appointment,  failed  to  reimburse 
their  spurious  representative,  who  actu- 
ally brought  legal  action  to  recover  what 
he  considered  his  just  fee. 

Fate  Intervenes 

On  June  \^.  \^Q2,  Dr.  de  Forest  was 
appointed  head  medical  advisor  in  charge 
of  all  Civil  Service  physical  examina- 
tions, and  a  few  days  later  was  called  to 
a  conference  with  Civil  Service  Commis- 
sioner Col.  \Villis  L.  Ogden.  The  subject 
of  this  discussion  was  the  creation  of 
some  reliable  preventive  measure  to  frus- 
trate any  further  attempts  at  misrepre- 
sentation b\'  applicants.  As  a  result.  Dr. 
de  Forest  agreed  to  make  a  survey  of 
available  identification  methods. 

On  August  1,  1902,  the  doctor  sailed 
for  England,  where  his  plans  included 
a  cross  country  bicycle  tour  in  company 
with  his  wife,  and  later,  a  visit  to  Paris 
where  he  intended  to  make  a  thorough 
in\estigation  of  Bertillon's  system  at  its 
source.  However,  the  hand  of  fate  in- 
tervened in  the  form  of  a  newspaper  ar- 
ticle appearing  September  15,  1902,  in  an 
issue  of  the  "London  Daily  Telegraph," 
captioned  "Identification  by  Finger- 
prints." This  item  came  quite  casually 
to  Dr.  de  Forest's  notice,  and  very  natu- 
rally aroused  his  immediate  interest.  The 
account  related  how  one  Harry  Jackson, 
an  ex-offender,  had  recently  been  recoll- 
ected of  burglary  by  the  fingerprints  he 
had  unwittingly  left  during  the  commis- 
sion of  his  latest  crime. 

Ready  Solution 

Sensing  here  a  ready  solution  to  his 
personal  problem.  Dr.  de  Forest  at  once 
\  isited  Scotland  Yard,  and  eventualh' 
met  Sergeant  Charles  Collins,  who  was 
eager  to  furnish  all  needful  information 
relati\'e  to  the  Galton-Henry  system  em- 
ployed in  the  local  bureau,  which  at  that 
time  contained  over  three  hundred  thou- 
sand fingerprint  cards. 

Feeling  well  asured  that  further  search 
would  discover  nothing  superior  to  fin- 
gerprinting as  an  identification  system, 
the  doctor  returned  to  New  York.  How- 
ever, he  did  subsequently  meet  Bertillon, 
and  examined  his  method,  and,  on  this 
later  European  venture,  visited  a  num- 
ber of  fingerprint  bureaus,  including  those 
of  Christiania,  Stockholm,  Copenhagen, 
St.  Petersburg,  Moscow,  ^Varsaw,  and 


SUGAR  BOWL 

3703    Twentieth    Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ROSE  BOWL  LIQUORS 

3045   Army   Street,   Corner  Alabama 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Compliments    of 

MISS  MILDRED  G.  STONE 

SODA   FOUNTAIN   SHOP 
328   Courtland   Avenue 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Try    Us    and   Compare 

"Zephyr"  Cleaners  and   Dyers 

Odorless  Cleaning    -     Quality  Workmanship 

Expert  Alteration  and   Repairing 

4001    Balboa  Street  BAyview  1-4669 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

LEAVENWORTH   MARKET 


1762   Leavenworth   Street 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


YOUNG  COMPANY 

GROCERS 

1658   O'Farrell    Street  Fillmore   6-8358 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Pacific  American   Distributing  Co. 

550   Beale   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

UNIVERSITY  RESTAURANT 

2078    Hayes    Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MON  SING 

Specializing  in  Egg  Noodles 
1392    Pacific    Avenue 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Compliments  of 
A     FRIEND 


Z  I  E  G  L  E  R  'S 

Jewelers    and   Watchmakers 

Santa  Fe  R  R.  Watch  Inspectors 

210  Townsend  Street  Phone  GA   1-2784 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Chin's  Liquors  and  Groceries 


2092  Sutter  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


JO  7-3663 

CALIFORNIA 


Fillmore    6-2414 

CAREW  &  ENGLISH 

FUNERAL   DIRECTORS 
Masonic   and  Golden  Gate  Avenue 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JOE  THE  TAILOR 

5898   Mission    Street  DElaware    3-7342 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  46 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


BUTCHER  AND   FOX 

Auto    Undercoating   and    Polishing 
Free   Pickup   and   Delivery   Service 


248   Oak   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


Phone   UNderhill    3-2288 

CALIFORNIA 


THE  TWINS 

Will  Be  There  to  Service  Your  Favorite  Cocktails 

Open  6  A  M.  to  2  A.  M. 

597-599  Post  Street  Phone  PRospect  5-1042 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


F.  &  G.  PORK  STORE 

2770  Mission  Street  Phone  Mission  7-4003 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC  BUILDING 

4th  and  Market  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

DEANS  AND  HOMER 

INSURANCE  AND  GENERAL  AGENTS 

340   Pine   Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

VITTORI   BROS. 

Fruits,  Vegetables  and  Poultry,  Fancy  Groceries 


3820-2<5    Mission    St. 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


Phone    MUsion    R-3'70 

CALIFORNIA 


ST.  FRANCIS  DELICATESSEN 

GROCERIES   -   BEER  -   WINES  AND   LIQUORS 

1579   Sanchez   Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

JOS.  C.  FLETCHER 

1415   Folsom   Street  UNderhill    1-2991 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORN'A 

R.  MOHR  &  SONS  DIVISION 

AMERICAN  OPTICAL  CO. 


8»3  M!"=="n    Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO 


GArfield    1-SS1S 

CALIFORN'A 


Garrett  M.  Goldberci  Paint  Co. 

MANUFACTURERS   SINCE   1906 


1019  Mission  St.-eet 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


Phone  UNderhi'l  1-0197 

CALIFORN'^ 


JACK  AND  MILT 

TOBACCOS  -  MAGAZINES  -  LIQUORS 


1501    F-lImore  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO 


Phone  Fillmore  C-.-S.-in' 

CALIFORNIA 


SIDNEY  MIRON 


Po='tiveIv    Pavs    the    H-^h^^st    Prices    for   Ladi°<: 
airl    Oenls     -     S-^cond-Hj^n^   Gown<;.   nress*";   and 

Suits    -    We  Carrv  a  FuM  Line  of  New  Furs 
17K0  Gearv   St.,   Betwp^n   Fillmnre   and   Web^t-r 

WEst    1-1552  SAN  FRANCISCO.  CAl  IF. 


ALBERT  PICARD 

405    Montgomery    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORn"^ 

ST.   FRANCIS   FOUNTAIN 

Serving  the  Community  for  32  Years  'n  the  S»me 

Location    Featuring   Onat'tv    Hommade   Cand''='e, 

Ice  Cream   and   L'g^t  Lunches. 

2801    -   74th  Street,  Corner  York 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Vienna,  as  well  as  several  others  in  Ger- 
many, This  extended  investigation  was 
amply  convincing,  demonstrating  beyond 
any  question  the  marked  superiority  of 
fingerprint  methods. 

Upon  arrival  at  New  York,  in  Oc- 
tober, 1902,  after  the  initial  contact  with 
Scotland  Yard,  Dr.  de  Forest  outlined 
his  well  formulated  plan  to  Col.  Ogden, 
who  gave  it  personal  approval  and  official 
sanction.  Within  a  fortnight,  the  appro- 
priate forms  and  other  needful  items  were 
prepared,  and  a  modern  fingerprint  file 
had  its  debut  in  the  United  States  of 
America. 

First  Applicant 

The  expediency  of  this  form  of  regis- 
tration was  of  high  importance  in  this 
instance,  since  at  that  time,  between 
twenty  and  thirty  thousand  Civil  Service 
applicants  were  examined  annually  in 
the  city.  Dr.  de  Forest  in  his  writings 
asserts  that  during  the  ten  years  he  occu- 
pied the  position  of  Chief  Medical  Ex- 
aminer, the  aspirants  to  city  employment 
who  passed  through  his  bureau  number- 
ed well  over  a  quarter  of  a  million. 

Following  the  installation  of  the  new 
registration  bureau,  the  first  person  to  be 
recorded  was  a  Mr.  James  Johnson,  an 
applicant  for  membership  in  the  New 
York  City  Fire  Department,  whose  fin- 
gerprints were  taken  on  December  19, 
1902.  Since  this  individual  plays  so  mate- 
rial a  part  in  fingerprint  history,  it  is 
gratifying  to  relate  that  he  was  success- 
ful in  his  examinations,  and  was  appoint- 
ed on  September  21,  1903,  being  assigned 
for  duty  on  the  fireboat  "Zopher  Mills." 

A  quarter  century's  active  service  was 
marked  by  transfer,  promotion,  and  nu- 
merous recognitions  for  distinguished 
performance  under  hazardous  circum- 
stances, concluding  with  honorable  re- 
tirement, when  James  Johnson  was  pen- 
sioned from  the  department  on  June  6, 
1928. 

Pattern  Unchanged 

Throughout  Dr.  de  Forest's  many  anil 
varied  activities,  the  subject  of  Dernia- 
tography  ever  remained  a  fascinating 
study,  and  his  academic  interest  furnish- 
ed invaluable  support  in  bringing  the 
science  into  general  recognition  and  ac- 
ceptance. He  was  later  elected  to  the 
presidency  of  the  subsequently  organized 
International  Society  for  Personal  Iden- 
tification, which  distinguished  post  his 
enthusiastic  constituents  would  not  per- 
mit him  to  relinquish  for  a  fvill  decade. 
Upon  final  retirement  from  office,  he  was 
honored  by  a  testimonial  dinner  at  the 
Hotel  McAIpin,  in  New  York  City,  on 
the  evening  of  January  26,  1935.  Num- 
bered among  the  many  noteworthy  guests 


LIGHTSTONE'S 

2798   Mission   Street 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


EASY  WASHING  MACHINE 
CORPORATION 

1 355   Market    Street 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


"Where   Customers    Send    Their    Friends" 

LLOYD'S  SERVICE  STATION 

Lubrication    -    Simonize    -    Gas    -     Oil     -    Parts 

Accessories    -    Tune-Ups  a  Specialty 

5301    Mission   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Great  American   Insurance  Co. 

OF  NEW  YORK 
Herbert    Ryman,   Vice-President 

Pacific  Department:   320  California   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Sandusky's  Indian  Trading  Post 

Indian  Trading  Post    -    Complete  Line  of  Reser- 
vation   Made    Indian    Jewelry,    Navajo    and    Chi- 

mayo  Rugs,   Indian   Crafts   and   Antiques. 
323   Grant   Avenue  Phone   YUkon   6-0715 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Yerba  Buena  French  Laundry 

ALL  WORK  DONE   BY  HAND 


2157  Lombard   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


Phone  WE«t   1-?171 

CALIFORNIA 


JULIUS'  CASTLE 


302  Greenwich   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


DOuglas   2-3042 

CALIFORNIA 


AVENUE  AUTO  PARTS 

2410   San   Bruno   Avenue 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phon*-  WAlnul    1-2434  Vinre  Minors 

Minors  and  Saverv  Brothers 

Antiauf^s.     Press     Work,     Punchinc:.     Stamoiner, 

Metal   Sninning",  I-amD*;,  Lpn'^es.  H'^h'way  Ru'Is- 

eye    Reflectors,    S'gnals,    Reoair    Work,    Stenc'l 

Machines,  F.tc. 

760    McAllister  Street  San   Francisco,  Calif. 

Thomas  Radiator  Mfq.  Co. 

Thomas  Suoer   Prrvlucl  Yukon   Coooer  Radiator 
Cores   .  .  .  Most  Effic'pnl   for  Automotive  or  Air 

Conditioning. 
B46     r.nlden     Gate     Ave.  Phone     PR     R-7Q00 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WESTERN   SEWING  COMPANY 

716    Sacramento   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BABE  ZANCA 

Complete  Automotive  Sfrvice  -   Ba*ter'es,  Tir'-s, 

Accessories.    Pamt-ng-    Bodv   and    Fender  Work. 

Martm  E'lpinal,   Service  Manager 

2130    Polk   Street  PRospect    S-SO^O 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YOUR  SELF  SERVICE  LAUNDRY 

Finished   and   Washed   and   Dry 
1-aundry  Service    -    Dry  Cleaning 


1735   Fnlfon    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


JOrdan    7-BBd4 

CALIFORNIA 


Phil's  Mobil  Service  Station 

We  Specialize  in  Certified  Lubrication,  Tires  and 
Batteries,   Gasoline,    Oil   and   Accessories. 


2501    Lombard   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


Phone  WEst  1-51 11 

CALIFORNIA 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURiNAL 


Page  47 


Dr.  Russ.  L.  Alley 

Physician     -     Surgeon    -     Osteopath 

EXbrook  2-2240,  Day  and  Night 

323  Geary  Street.   Suite  414 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SEWARD-WHEELER  STUDIO 

ILLUSTRATION   -   LAYOUT 
216  Market   Street  Phone   DOuglas   2-7120 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ZIPPER  SUPPLY  &   REPAIR  CO. 

84   First   Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SANFORD  CLEANERS 

Wholesale  Cleaning   and  Dyeing 

Jack   Friedman 

270-274  Valencia  Street  UNderhill   1-9040 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BILL     YOUNGS 

PAINTING  CONTRACTOR 

1444  -   48th   Avenue 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Hilltop  Barber  &   Beauty  Shop 

159  -   161    Hilltop   Road 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  GRAYSTONE 

REASONABLE    RATES 


66  Geary  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


EXbrook  2-4885 

CALIFORNIA 


COAST  SUPPLY  CO. 

Distributors   of  Pre-Popped  Corn 


977  Howard  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


DOuglas  2-2689 

CALIFORNIA 


Comp/imenfs  of 
A     FRIEND 


THE  MaclNTOSH  COMPANY 

544  Market   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

RELIABLE  GLASS  CO. 

Specializing   in   Auto   Glass 

2015  -  16th  Street  HEmlock  1-0684 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  GArfield    I- 1515 

A.  J.  ZIRPOLI 

300   Montgomery    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO   4  CALIFORNIA 

HOBART  BROS. 

Polyken  Industrial  Tapes     -    Miracle  Adhesives. 

Zegers,  Inc.  "Dura-Seal"  Tremco  Mfg.  Co. 

"Tremglaze" 

200  Davis  Street  YUkon  2-32S8 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WALLACE-ZORN  -  Phofos 

Wavne   W.   Woolerv 

HEmlock  1-1709,  1-1710  ...  If  no  answer, 

call  GArfield    1-1155 

389  Valencia   Street 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


was  Mr.  James  Johnson,  anil,  during  the 
program,  his  fingerprints  were  again  re- 
corded by  Dr.  de  Forest  after  an  interval 
of  thirty-three  years.  Needless  to  say,  the 
pattern  forms  showed  no  material  altera- 
tion. 

At  about  the  time  of  Dr.  de  Forest's  in- 
\  estigative  trip  through  England,  another 
American  executive  faced  a  dilemma. 
During  the  summer  of  1902,  Cornelius 
V.  Collins,  Superintendent  of  Prisons  in 
New  York  State,  was  having  the  custom- 
ary difficulty  with  Bertillon  files  in  the 
identification  bureaus  of  various  state  in- 
stitutions; as  usual,  with  large  collections 
of  records,  the  system's  defects  were  be- 
coming glaringly  apparent.  The  urgency 
was  such  that  he  dispatched  two  repre- 
sentatives to  Europe,  with  the  purpose  of 
studying  identification  methods  employed 
there,  in  the  hope  of  discovering  some 
better  system  for  the  subclassification  of 
Bertillon  cards  in  the  American  regis- 
tries. 

Fingerprints  Superior 

The  men  selected  for  this  mission  were 
the  Hon.  Charles  K.  Haker,  Chief  Clark, 
New  York  Prison  Department,  and  Dr. 
R.  B.  Lamb,  of  Dannemore  State  Hos- 
pital. These  emissaries  made  a  careful 
survey  of  foreign  procedures,  including 
both  the  French  and  British,  returning 
to  the  United  States  convinced,  as  was 
Dr.  de  Forest,  that  fingerprint  identifi- 
cation is  superior  to  all  other  forms.  To 
their  sponsor,  they  presented  a  recom- 
mendation for  the  adoption  of  finger- 
printing, which  met  with  approval.  Su- 
perintendent Collins  turned  over  the  text- 
books and  other  collected  data  to  an  al- 
ready mentioned  executive.  Captain  James 
H.  Parke  of  the  Prison  Department,  for 
installation  and  development. 

Captain  Parke's  lively  interest  and  ap- 
plication constituted  yet  another  gener- 
ous subscription  to  the  cause,  since  he 
not  only  mastered  the  Galton-Henry  sys- 
tem, but  also  devised  additional  exten- 
sions thereto,  and,  by  1903,  was  finger- 
printing all  inmates  in  the  New  York 
penal  institutions. 

Captain  Parke's  initial  position  of 
prison  guard  was  eventually  followed  by 
promotion  to  the  important  post  of 
Parole  Statistician  of  the  New  "^'ork 
State  Prison  Department.  His  mastery 
of  fingerprint  methods  led  to  such  out- 
standing and  useful  results  that  it  was 
decided  to  make  an  exhibit  of  this  tech- 
nique in  conjunction  with  the  Bertillon 
system  at  the  forthcoming  St.  Louis  Ex- 
position. This  was  done,  with  the  unex- 
pected outcome  that  the  interesting  dis- 
play prepared  and  presented  by  Captain 
Parke  was  awarded  the  Grand  Prize. 


OLGA'S   FOUNTAIN 

1954  Hyde  Street  ORdway   3-S413 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ZIMS'   RESTAURANT 

Miss   Elaine   Nichols 

1415   Market   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CHAS.  H.  ZIPSER  CO. 

Printers  -  Bookbinders  Supplies,  Machinery 
Equipment 

515  Howard  Street  DOuglas  2-1850 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WARREN  W.  ZIMMER 

Free   Lance   Advertising  Artist 


216   Market   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


YUkon   6-6S45 

CALIFORNIA 


SUNSET  WATCH   REPAIRING 

Watch    and    Jewelry    Repairing     -     Gifts,    Rings, 

Watches,  Diamonds   and  Mountings. 

H.  E.  Seeds,  Expert   Watchmaker 

1342   -  9th  Avenue  MOntrose  4-0716 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


YOUNGHAVEN   STUDIO  -  Danc'tnq 

Miss   Audree    Young 


102  Clipper  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


ATwater  2-2125 

CALIFORNIA 


California  Employment  Agency 

Clerical     -     Hotel     -     Restaurant     -     Domestic 
Resort     -     Bakery 

821   Market  Street,  Room  265 

SAN    FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone   SKyline    1-7998  Lucretia    Swinburne 

WILSON  CLEANERS 

Alterations     -     Repairs 
2110   Clement    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Res.  BA   1-6369 


Telephone  SK   2-0250 

ZOIA  BEAUTY  SALON 

Specializing  in  All   Kinds  of   Permanent  Waving 

AH   Branches    of   Beauty   Culture 

1819   Balboa   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


POLLY'S 

CARDS    -    STATIONERY    -    GIFTS 


1010  Taraval  Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO 


MOntrose  4-5360 

CALIFORNIA 


Persian  Aub-Zam-Zam 

.   .   .   COCKTAILS   .   .   . 

1633   Haight  Street  Phone   MArket    1-1636 

SAN    FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

A.  E.  ROWE  &  COMPANY 

660   Mission   Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Compliments  of 
A     FRIEND 


MIRON  GROSSMAN 

543   Mission   Srteet  YUkon   6-2671 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  48 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


PACIFIC  GEAR  &  TOOL  WORKS 

1035   Folsom    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIKORNIA 

LACE  HOUSE  FRENCH   LAUNDRY 

Mme.  J  P.  Bourdet,  Prop. 
CASH  AND  CARRY 


3038     -    24th    Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


Phone    Mission    7-4720 

CALIFORNIA 


A  &  H  AUTO  PARTS 

Al   Flaum 
3809   Geary   Boulevard  SKyline   1-0941 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JACKSON'S  NOOK 

Private  Dining  Room    -     Chinese  and   American 
Dishes 

Mr.   and  Mrs.  J    W.   Jackson.   Props. 
1638  Buchanan  Street  Phone  JOrdan  7-9790 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


BINN'S  MACHINE  WORKS 


1072  Bryant  Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


HEmlock  1-3570 

CALIFORNIA 


BAYVIEW  BAIT  SHOP 

Sporting  Goods  -   Fishing  Tackle  -  Fishing 

Parties  Arranged  .  .  .  Phone  Your  Order  to  Be 

Sure   of   Bait   ...   A.   Bin 


4408   Third  Street 
SAN    FRANCISCO 


ATwater  2-3242 

CALIFORNIA 


Parker  Water  Heater  Service 

Successor   to   Edward   H.   Parker 

All  Types  of  Water  Heaters  Installed  &  Repaired 

Chester   C.    Parker,   Licensed   Gas   Appliance 

Dealer 

750   Monterey   Boulevard  JUniper   7-7233 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


BAY  BRIDGE  EMPORIUM 

Ruth   and   Maurice   Zugman 


130   Valencia   Street 

SAN   FRANCISCO 


UNderhill   3-2928 

CALIFORNIA 


Louis  Holm  Silver  Pheasant 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 
1813  San  Jose  Ave.  JUniper  4-9926 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PASTIME  BILLIARD  PARLOR 

POOL    -    BILLIARDS 
Soft   Drinks 

1235  FILLMORE  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone   Fillmore  6-3  3  1  I 

AMERICAN   MARKET 

MEAT  AND   POULTRY 

1714-1716   Fillmore  St„  between  Post  «c  Sutter 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


P.  A.  BERGEROT 

110  SUTTER  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MArket    1-8080 

JOS.  D.  SHEEDY  DRAYAGE 

630  Tennessee  St.  (Near  Third  &  Mariposa  Sts.) 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Inspector  Ferrier 

A  name  justifying  especial  recognition 
and  remembrance  in  latter  day  finger- 
print history  is  that  of  Inspector  John 
Kenneth  Ferrier,  of  Scotland  Yard, 
whose  presence  in  America,  though  cir- 
cumstantial, was  of  utmost  importance 
to  the  science  of  modern  identification. 

When  the  abo\e  mentioned  World's 
Centennial  Exposition  was  held  at  St. 
Louis  in  1904,  Kind  Edward  of  Eng- 
land loaned  the  Jubilee  presents  of  Queen 
Victoria,  which  included  the  famous 
Kohinoor,  then  the  largest  diamond  in 
the  world,  to  be  placed  on  exhibition 
there.  Some  idea  of  the  value  represent- 
ed by  these  jeweled  treasures  gathered 
from  all  parts  of  the  empire,  is  indicated 
by  the  fact  that  the  collection  was  in- 
sured for  fifteen  million  dollars.  To  ac- 
company and  constantly  guard  the  ex- 
hibit, a  number  of  picked  men  were  se- 
lected from  Scotland  Yard,  among  them, 
Mr.  Ferrier.  Scotland  Yard  also  had  an 
exhibit  at  the  Exposition,  and,  of  this  dis- 
play, Mr.  Ferrier  was  in  personal  charge. 

At  that  time,  American  identification 
procedure  was  still  consistently  impeded 
by  anthropometry,  although  Great  Bri- 
tain and  her  possessions  had  for  several 
years  demonstrated  the  superiority  of  fin- 
gerprints in  their  modern  application.  But 
American  police  officers,  then  frequently 
of  the  stolid,  sedentary  "nightwatchman" 
type,  had,  with  some  few  and  scattered 
exceptions,  little  knowledge  or  curiosity 
regarding  the  methods  employed  by  for- 
eign departments. 

Impossible  Task 

In  Scotland  Yard,  Mr.  Ferrier's  du- 
ties had  been  largely  in  the  identification 
bureau  under  the  tutelage  of  Sir  E.  R. 
Henry,  and  consequently  he  was  a  hearty 
advocate  of  his  teacher's  precepts.  Arriv- 
ing in  St.  Louis  April  10,  1904,  he  lost 
no  time  voicing  to  local  authorities  the 
praises  of  fingerprinting.  But,  as  usual, 
the  suggestions  encountered  cynical  skep- 
ticism. This  was  both  unfortunate  and 
inexcusable,  since  Ferrier's  contentions 
were  amply  objectified  by  several  actual 
displays  of  fingerprints  at  the  Exposition. 
However,  Mr.  Ferrier  was  definitely  a 
person  not  to  be  lightly  discouraged,  and 
energetically  continued  his  missionary 
endeavors.  AVith  such  insistence  did  he 
press  his  cause  that  many  of  his  listeners 
styled  him  a  tiresome  fanatic,  on  the  pop- 
ular assumption  than  any  departure  from 
convention  must  necessarily  be  all  wrong. 

^Vith  scant  appreciation  and  less  un- 
derstanding for  all  that  Ferrier  was  offer- 
ing, the  St.  Louis  officers  conceived  the 
idea  of  quieting  him  by  setting  what  they 
considered  an   impossible  task  for  their 


LIBERTY   FARMS,  INC. 

400  MONTGOMERY  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PALACE  UPHOLSTERING  SHOP 

Chesterfields    Recovered     -     New    Sets    Made    to 
Order     -     Reasonable    Prices     -     Free   Estimates 

5791    Mission   Street  JUniper   4-2471 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Pound's   Refrigeration  Service 

Youngstown  Dishwashers      -      Coolerator 
Refrigerators 


615   Diamond   Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO 


VAlencia   4-7737 

CALIFORNIA 


Phil   Lynch  Sporting  Goods  Co. 

WHOLESALE   AND  RETAIL 
623   MissionStreet  YUkon   6-6950 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MERRY  CHRISTMAS 
AND    A    HAPPY    NEW    YEAR 

EDYTH   LEIGH   SHOPPE 

Women's   and  Children's  Wear 

2806  TARAVAL  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Son  Francisco  Advertising  Club 

690   MARKET   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

TRUNK  &  LEATHER  GOODS 

Repair  Shop 

Expert   Repairing  of   Suit  Cases.   Brief  Cases.  All 
kinds   of    leather    goods.   Zippers   repaired   or   re- 
placed.   Gold  Leaf  Stamping. 

12   GEARY   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

"You'll  wonder  why   you  never  ate  here  before" 

Parcel  Post  CofFee  Shop 

GOOD   MEALS   -   AT  REASONABLE   PRICES 
115  MISSION  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SARATOGA  BEAUTY  SALON 

Specializing  in  Pemnanent  Waving,  Haircutting, 
Tinting    .    .    .    Open    Evenings    by    Appointment 

Jane    Pickering.    Operator 
3800  Noriega  St.,  Entrance   on  45th  Ave. 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

E.  SYVERSEN 

Manufacturing   Jeweler 
962  Phelan   Building 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HICK'RY  PIT 

SPARERIBS  $1.45 

Beef    -     Ham    -    Pork    -    Steaks    -    Spareribs 

Barbecued    Over   the   Open   Fire 

Free  Parking  in  Rear. 
3545   California   Street 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


THE  HERMANN   SAFE  CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Howard   and  Main  Streets 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNA 


Dec.   J 952  -  Jan.   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  49 


NEW  DIAMOND  MARKET 

Groceries    -    Produce    -  Wine    -    Beer 

600  Castro  Street  UN  1-7414 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Park  Auto   Reconstruction  Co. 

SYyline  1-4636  .  .  .  PHONE  .  .  .  SKyline  1-4650 

624  Stanyan  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  YUkon  2-373  1  Res.  JUniper  7-0187 

Washington  &  Sawyer,  Inc. 

Civil  Engineering  and  Surveying 

204  Sacramento  St.,  Corner  Davis   St. 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PAX      HOTEL 

SPECIAL  WEEKLY   RATES 
DAILY— $1.50   AND    UP 

246   MASON   STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SWANSON'S   MOHAWK   SERVICE 

1795   FIFTEENTH   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

W.  A.  Palmer  Films,   Inc. 

611    Howard   Street  YUkon   6-5961 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

DRUMM   LIQUOR  STORE 

133   Drumm  Street  YUkon  6-619S 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL   HALE 

939   Mission   Street  SUtter   1-9515 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


REM   REALTY  COMPANY 

679   PORTOLA   DRIVE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Want  Books  -  Post-O-Card  Want  Order  Books 

Env-O-BIank  Want  Order  Books  Envelope 

Order   Blanks 

ORVILLE   E.  DE   BOLT  CO. 

394  PACIFIC  AVENUE 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PRospect   5-9610 

WALKER'S   FOUNTAIN   LUNCH 

1019   Van    Ness    Avenue 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


uouKl  be  instructor.  Just  prior  to  this 
time,  there  had  been  arrested  in  that  city 
a  confidence  man  of  polished  appearance, 
who  ensnared  his  numerous  victims  b\ 
most  impressive  and  official  looking  en- 
posing  as  a  member  of  the  royal  family 
of  England,  under  the  name  of  "Lord 
Harrington. "  With  this  fictitious  creden- 
tial, his  pretensions  sufficed  to  dupe  a 
sizeable  number  of  unsuspecting  citizens 
into  making  generous  but  ill  advised 
"loans,"  which  of  course  were  never  re- 
paid. But  the  smooth  swindler  finally 
overstepped  himself,  and  his  arrest  fol- 
lowed, with  the  final  disposition  of  a  term 
in  the  Jefferson  City  Penitentiary. 

This  dubious  person  was  selected  as  a 
foil  in  the  attempted  hoax  on  the  presum- 
ably ill  prepared  Scotland  Yard  e.xpert. 
The  penitentiary  warden  was  instructed 
to  bring  the  prisoner  to  St.  Louis,  osten- 
sibly for  an  additional  check  on  his  rec- 
ord. ^Vhen  not  on  duty  at  the  Exposition 
groLinds,  Ferrier  and  his  fellow  officers 
as  well  usually  spent  considerable  leisure 
time  in  the  St.  Louis  identification  bur- 
eau. When  the  guards  arrived  with  their 
prisoner,  the  bureau  superintendent  called 
Ferrier,  explaining  that  the  prisoner's 
true  identity  and  previous  behavior  were 
not  known,  which  was  partially  true,  but 
that  he  was  suspected  of  having  been  ar- 
rested in  England,  and  "would  Inspector 
Ferrier  please  try  to  secure  the  needful 
information  ?" 

Fingerprints  on  Foolscap 

There  is  little  doubt  that  Ferrier  was 
fully  aware  of  the  essayed  duplicity,  and 
probably  experienced  keen  though  tacit, 
amusement  at  the  futile  gesture.  How- 
ever, he  outwardly  accorded  every  respect 
to  the  apparent  dignity  of  the  occasion. 
Since  obviously  there  was  no  conventional 
fingerprint  equipment  at  hand,  Ferrier 
blackened  the  prisoner's  digits  with  a 
common  rubber-stamp  pad,  and  rolled 
the  impressions  on  a  sheet  of  foolscap. 

No  inkling  of  any  sort  was  offered  as 
to  the  subject's  true  name,  and  a  plain 
prison  uniform  had  replaced  the  erst- 
while conspicuously  British  Prince  Al- 
bert coat  and  striped  trousers ;  gone  were 
the  lordly  monocle  and  high  hat.  The 
gleeful  pranksters  felt  sure  that  Ferrier's 
chances  of  establishing  an  identification 
were  practically  nil.  But  Ferrier  had  se- 
cured more  intimate  data  than  all  the 
rest,  fingerprints;  and  with  no  indication 
of  his  inward  reactions,  he  departed  with 
the  promise  to  contact  Scotland  Yard  at 
once. 

Highly  elated  at  what  they  considered 
the  "exposure  "  of  an  over  radical  zealot, 
Ferrier's  smug  hecklers  then  forthwith 
dismissed  from  their  complacence  all 
thought  of  him  and  his  "outlandish"  sug- 


SAUSALITO 
SHIPBUILDING 
COMPANY 


1702  Bridge  way 
Sausalito,  California 


Robert  E.  Acorne 

24  HOUR  SERVICE 
UNION  OIL  DEALER 

123  Third  Street 
PETALUMA,   CALIFORNIA 


THE  TOP  HAT 


819  FOURTH  STREET 
SAN  RAFAEL,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  50 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


SEASON'S  GREETINGS  .  .  . 

Marin  Wheel  Alignment 
&  Frame  Service 

509  FRANCISCO   BOULEVARD 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


BARONIAL  CAKE   BOX 

"OUR  CREATIONS — YOUR  TEMPTATIONS" 
1007   C   STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


CROCKETT'S  VAN  &  STORAGE 

522   "B"  STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  Glenwood   3-3393 

M.    BURKE 

Estimates    Furnished    for    Linoleums,    Awnings, 

Window  Shades  and  Mattress  Work. 

Carpet   Binding    and    Installing. 

915   Looten   Street,    Between    Third   and   Fourth 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

Dr.  Stephen  A.  Duff,  DC 


1104  Irwin  Street 
SAN   RAFAEL,   CALIF. 


WEBB  AND  ROGERS 
.  .  .  Drugs  .  .  . 

1146  Fourth  Street 
SAN  RAFAEL,  CALIFORNIA 


gestions.  But  the  finger  of  destiny  had 
once  again  intervened  to  mark  a  shifting 
page,  and  some  days  later  there  arrived 
at  the  St.  Louis  identification  bureau  a 
velope  displaying  the  seal  of  His  Majes- 
ty's Service.  This  proved  to  be  a  letter 
from  the  Criminal  Identification  Divi- 
sion, New  Scotland  'V'ard,  Metropolitan 
Police,  acknowledging  receipt  of  the  late 
request  forwarded  through  Sergeant  John 
K.  Ferrier,  and  enclosing  photographs  of 
"Lord  Barrington,"  whose  true  name 
was  shown  to  be  "Barton,"  copies  of  his 
fingerprints,  and  his  complete  criminal 
history,  showing  many  prior  arrests  and 
convictions  under  various  aliases,  until 
his  departure  from  England. 

Factual  Evidence 

Here  was  factual  evidence  to  convince 
the  most  dull-witted  skeptic,  and  former 
apathy  now  gaped  in  dumb  amazement. 
Ferrier,  who  had  purposely  shunned  the 
police  station  pending  the  letter's  arrival, 
was  eagerly  sought  for,  and  a  special 
messenger  respectfully  requested  that  he 
confer  with  the  Chief  of  Police  as  soon 
as  conveniently  possible.  The  conclusion 
of  the  episode  was  an  enthusiastic  class 
of  fingerprint  students,  organized  and  in- 
structed by  Ferrier  during  the  summer 
and  fall  of  1904 ;  and  Ferrier  writes  that, 
following  the  recognition  and  adoption 
of  fingerprints  in  the  St.  Louis  police  de- 
partment, the  first  prisoner  to  be  thus 
recorded  was  one  Percy  Ogilvie,  sen- 
tenced to  three  months'  imprisonment  for 
obtaining  money  by  false  pretensions. 

This  briefly  outlined  drama  was  but 
one  of  many  eventualities  resulting  from 
Mr.  Ferrier's  noteworthy  and  versatile 
efiorts.  His  pupils  became  subsequent 
teachers ;  public  lectures,  demonstrations 
before  representative  groups,  together 
with  numerous  written  articles,  served 
to  disseminate  useful  information  which 
was  to  identify  Sergeant  John  Kenneth 
Ferrier,  later  promoted  to  Inspector,  as 
one  of  the  more  prominent  personalities 
in  the  modern  field  of  personal  identifi- 
cation. 

lo  lie  Continued  Next  Month 

Communications  Officers 

(Conlinued  from  pai/r  S) 

An  application  for  membership  from 
Leland  Smith  of  Chico  was  read  and 
turned  over  to  the  Board  for  study  and 
clarification  of  status. 

George  Burton  gave  an  interesting 
talk  and  explanation  of  Contra  Costa 
County's  new  system. 

Bob  Mason  offered  Alviso  for  the 
next  meeting  place.  Accepted. 

There  being  no  further  business  the 
meeting  was  adjourned  at  2:20  p.m. 


THE  YACHT  CLUB 

807    IRWIN   STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

THE   MUSIC   BOX 

1618   SECOND    STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

MARIN   RADIATOR  SERVICE 

509  FRANCISCO   BOULEVARD 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

BRUNNER'S  CLEANERS 

Drive-in  Store  and -Plant 
3rd   and   Lindard 

Branch    Store 

1109  Fourth   Street 

SAN  RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

THE  YACHT  CLUB 

307   IRWIN  STREET 
SAN  RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


THE  BROTHERS 

6  -  8   LOCUST  STREET 
MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

SHOESTRING  RESTAURANT 

382  MILLER   AVENUE 

MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

Compliments  of    .    .   . 

TWO  A.  M.  CLUB 

MONTFORD  AVENUE 
MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

MASTER  CLEANERS 

PICK-UP   AND  DELIVERY  SERVICE 
LAUNDRY   SERVICE 

9  Camino   Alto  Alto  Y 

MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

THE  CHINA  TRADER 

CHINESE  AND  AMERICAN  DISHES 
COCKTAILS  OUR  SPECIALTY 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   J 95 3 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'   TOURNAL 


Page  51 


—                                                  '  -  -  - 

WESTERN  IRON  AND 

BODY  WORKS 

• 

1165  -  67th  Street 

OAKLAND,  CALIFORNIA 

BERTOLA'S 

Six  Restaurants  in  East  Bay 

Italian  Style  Fried  Chicken 
Dinners  Still  Only  $1.35 


North  Oakland    -    East  Oakland 
Castro  Valley  -  Albany 
Richmond    -    Lafayette 


FREDRICKSON  & 

WATSON 

CONSTRUCTION 

CO. 

General  Engineering 
Contractors 

873  -  8 1ST  Street 
Oakland  3,  California 

SWeetwood  8-1264 


Manhattan  Bowling  Balls 

"The  Ball  of  More  Lhe  Rubber" 

Custom  Fitted  to  Your  Hand  at 

no  Extra  Charge  -  Bowling  Shoes 

Bowling  Bags    -    Bowling  Alley 

Supplies 

Also  Open  Saturdays 

9  a.m.  to  6  p.m. 

Milan  Zlokovich  Co. 

3716  San  Pablo  Avenue 
OAKLAND,  CALIFORNIA 
Telephone  HUmboldt  3-3386 


MAYOR  ROBINSON'S 
CHRISTMAS  MESSAGE.  1952 

1  o  every  man,  every  woman  and  par- 
ticularly to  every  child  in  San  Fran- 
cisco, I  wish  a  flood  tide  of  happiness 
this  Christmas. 


Mayor  Elmer  Robinson 
The  people  of  our  City,  ever  since  our 
foLuuliiip:,  have  been  kindly, warm  hearted 
and  high  spirited,  and  in  this  City,  where 
so  many  people  of  different  races  and 
national  origins  form  one  unit,  the  tre- 
mendous meaning  of  Christmas  has  al- 
ways bee  recognized  as  the  pattern  of  our 
community  life:  Peace  on  earth  to  men 
of  good  will. 

Let  all  of  us,  each  in  his  own  way, 
at  this  blessed  season,  follow  noblest  im- 
pulses of  our  hearts  and  souls;  let  us 
embrace  wholeheartedly  that  spirit  of 
forgiveness  and  kindly  tolerance  to  all 
our  fellow  men  so  that  we  may  be  coimt- 
ed  among  those  who  are  in  truth  and  in 
fact  men  of  good  will. 

May  every  child  in  our  City  enjoy 
the  happiness  that  belongs  to  children  at 
this  holy  season,  and  may  we,  their 
elders,  catch  the  reflections  of  their  hap- 
piness and  make  it  our  own. 

I  hope  that  the  peace,  the  content- 
ment and  the  happiness  of  the  Christ- 
mastide  will  abide  with  you  and  yours 
throughout  every  da\'  of  the  coming  year. 


Foothill  Police  Chief 

(Conlinurii  from  paaf  9) 

Anyway,  as  far  as  the  chief  is  con- 
cerned, the  poisonings  fall  into  the  cate- 
gory of  unsolved  crimes.  There  are  not 
many  of  those  in  Los  Gatos,  and  Phil- 
lips feels  strongly  about  the  few  there 
are. 


HOME   FIXTURE  BUILDERS 

1189    -    65th    Street  OLympic   2-0670 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Pete  Tire  Res:  OLvmpic  2    784  7 

TIRA  FURNITURE  COMPANY 

COMPLETE    HOME    FURNISHERS 

EASY    PAYMENT    PLAN 

4920   Telegraph   Ave  OLympic   2-2831 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S  AUTO  SERVICE 

'"Rebuilders    of    Fine   Engines" 

Cash  or  Terms     -    All  Work  Guaranteed 

No  Repair  Job  too   Large  or  too  Small 

BIOS  East   14th  Street  ANdover  1-9884 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

SAM'S  AUTO  SERVICE 

BODY   AND    FENDER   WORK 

Specializ'n?    in    Auto    Painting,    Simonizing    and 

Polishing    -     "Don't  Cuss  -  Call  Us" 

3220  San  Pablo  Ave.  GLencourl  3-4317 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

S  &  E  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

MACHINE   WORKS 


3103   Adeline   Street 

OAKLAND 


HUmboldt    3-3224 

CALIFORNIA 


Office:    TE    2    21<'0  Res.:    TW    3-3975 

Bruehl's  Metal   Manufacturing  Co. 

Established    in    1932 
TOOLS      •      DIES      •      STAMPINGS 


OAKLAND 


525   Market   Street 


CALIFORNIA 


J  &  J  Liquor  Store  &  Cider  Shop 

Nick    Christo 
THE   DEPOT   OF  ALL  WINES 


1204   Friiitvale   Ave. 
OAKLAND 


KEIlog  2-8024 

CALIFORNIA 


GATES  AUTO  BODY 

AUTO   PAINTING 
5341    College   Ave.  HUmboldt   3-7303 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

L.  F.  WITHARM 

Sheet   Metal     -     Warm   Air  Heating     -     Stain1ps<: 

Steel    -    Air     Conditioning   -    Gas.    Coal     and     Oil 

Furnaces 


1718  E.    12th   Street 

OAKLAND 


ANdover   1-1RB8 

CALIFORNIA 


WILLIE  P.  JONES 

WATCHES     -     DIAMONDS 

Newest     Creat'Ons     in     Jewelry     and     Diamonds, 

Wedding   and   Graduation   Gifts. 


1SI2   Seventh   Street 

OAKLAND 


TWinoaks    3-4733 

CALIFORNIA 


Telephone:  TWinoaks  2-4662     -     3-4663 


CARLSON'S 


BAKERS'  AND   CONFECTIONERS' 
SUPPLY   HOUSE 


229   HARRISON   STREET 
OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

KEIlog  20686 

WISEMAN'S  MARKET 

3136   THIRTEENTH   AVENUE 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  52 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'   JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


CHIEF  GAFFEY  LAUDED 


P.  &  N.  PRODUCE  CO. 

WHOLESALE   FRUIT  AND   PRODUCE 


301    FRANKLIN  STREET 


OAKLAND 


OLympic    2-8260 


San  Francisco's  traffic  conference  re- 
cently lauded  the  Police  Commission, 
Chief  Michael  Gaffey  and  his  depart- 
ment for  their  efforts  to  clear  the  streets 
of  illegal  parking  through  strict  law  en- 
CALIFORNIA  forcement  so  that  the  movement  of 
downtown   traffic  can   be  speeded. 


CONSOLIDATED   DRUM   CO. 

DRUMS   OF  ALL  DESCRIPTIONS 

4500  SHELLMOUND   STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

"AFTER   WE   SELL,  WE   SERVE" 

Vol  Strough  ChevroSet  Co. 


3330   Broadway 

OAKLAND 


Piedmont   S-4700 

CALIFORNIA 


S.  KULCHAR  &  CO. 


EIGHTH  AVENUE   AND  EAST  TENTH  ST. 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


OLympic  3-3713 

Higgins  -  Magee 

Printing  Ink  and 

Chemical  Company 

PRINTING  INKS 

1219  Park  Avenue 
Emeryville,  Calif. 


Chief  Michael  G.^ffey 

The  conference  is  composed  of  the 
Central  Council  of  Civic  Clubs,  the 
Down  Town  Association,  The  San 
Francisco  Chamber  of  Commerce  and 
the  San  Francisco  Planning  and  Hous- 
ing Association. 

The  organization's  chairman,  Roger 
D.  Lapham,  Jr.,  in  a  letter  to  Gaffey 
said :  "You  and  your  Department  have 
made  a  splendid  move  in  your  effort  to 
bring  about  a  free  flow  of  traffic  in  the 
congested  areas  of  San  Francisco.  This 
certainly  meets  with  the  approval  of  the 
Traffic  Conference.  As  you  know,  it  is 
part  of  our  Ten  Point  Traffic  Action 
Program. 

"We  hope  that  the  good  work  will 
continue.  It  has  already  given  assistance 
not  only  to  those  driving  cars,  but  also 
to  transit  via  bus,  trolley  and  street  car, 
and  an  improvement  has  been  noticeable 
during  the  past  few  days. 

"We  want  you  to  know  that  your 
efforts  are  greatly  appreciated,  and  we 
sincerely  thank  you,  the  Police  Com- 
mission and  the  Police  Department  for 
making  this  move  toward  an  improved 
flow   of   traffic   in    San   Francisco." 


Official   Brake  Testing  Station   No.   141 

Alameda  Wheel  &   Brake  Service 

C.    V.    Davier 
2217   Central   Avenue  LAkehurst  2-8515 

ALAMEDA  CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC  VINEGAR  COMPANY 

24th   and    Welcome   Avenue 

RICHMOND  CALIFORNIA 

BIGLER'S  STORE   FOR  MEN 


14353    East    14th    Street 

SAN   LEANDRO 


LOckhaven    8-4336 

CALIFORNIA 


STANDARD  TRAILER  CO. 

415   San    Leandro    Boulevard 

SAN    LEANDRO  CALIFORNIA 

STAR  LUNCH 

ALEX    AND    BILL 
1098   Verba   Buena  Piedmont   5-8570 

EMERYVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Piedmont    5-5035 


!9a(ionai  Transfer  &   Storage 


COAST   TO   COAST   VIA   MOTOR   VAN 


EMERYVILLE 


CALIFORNIA 


Piedmont    5-7617      Thomas  F.  Mason.  Treasurer 
— CALFAST— 

CALIFORNIA  FASTENERS 

SONOMA.  CALIFORNIA 

Special   and    Standard    Cold    Heated   and 
Thread    Rolled    Products 

Sales    Office:    1447    PARK   STREET 

EMERYVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    Piedmont    5-9366 

ROXY     HOTEL 

DAILY  AND  WEEKLY  RATES 
Daisy  M.  and  Chas.  C.  Smith,  Manager 

3619  SAN  PABLO  AVENUE 
EMERYVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


APEX 
MANUFACTURING  CO. 

Tool  -  Die  -  Machine  Shop 
Stamping  and  Drawing 

Landregen  and  Powell  Streets 

EMERYVILLE,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  OLympic  2-8851 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  53 


BErkeley    7- 7543 


FOLGER  LUMBER.   INC. 

— Service — 

LUMBER       •       MILLWORK 

940  FOLGER  AVENUE 


BERKELEY 


CALIFORNIA 


BErkeley   7-3470 


HOVEY  MACHINE   PRODUCTS 

p.  W.  "Scotty"   Hovey 
701    HEINZ   AVENUE 


BERKELE-i" 


CALIFORNIA 


RODS.  INC. 

Charles   J.   Fox 

70S    FolBer' Avenue  THornwall   3-3124 

BERKELEY'  CALIFORNIA 

BERKELEY  POULTRY  CO. 

A.    Simoni,    Prop. 

Wholesale  and  Retail  Poultry 

FRESH   RANCH  EGGS  -   LIVE  AND  DRESSED 

POULTRY   FOR  ALL  OCCASIONS 

141 1    San    Pablo   Avenue  LA   5-6202 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

DWSGHT  UPHOLSTERING  CO. 

Custom  Made  Furniture  -  Furniture  Upholstered, 

Repaired    and    Refinished    .    .    .    Estimates    Frte 

II.    S.    PhUlips 

2140  Dwight  Way  BErkeley  7-6411 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

Headman,   Ferguson  &  Carollo 

CONSULTING  ENGINEERS 
EMERYVILLE    .   .   .   PHOENIX 

2168   Shattack  Avenue 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

DWSGHT  WAY  NURSERY 

Specializing  in   Bedding  Plants 

General   Nursery   Stock 

Ricky   T.    Sumimoto 

1001    Dwight   Way  BErkeley   7-8623 

BERKELEY'  CALIFORNIA 

UP-TO-DATE   MARKET 

FRUIT,  VEGETABLES  AND  GROCERIES 
2644   Ashby   Avenue  BErkeley   7-6202 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

TAKEMORI   BROS. 

IMPORTERS   AND   DISTRIBUTORS 

THornwal  3-9829  Res.    HUmboldl   3-894  1 

1902  Ashby  Avenue 


BERKELEY 


CALIFORNIA 


CHILD'S  WARDROBE 

CLOTHING    -    TOYS    -    WHEEL  GOODS 
1563   Solano    Avenue  LAndscape   5-1044 

BERKELEY  CJiLlFORNI.A 

SKIPS  RADIO  AND  TV 

1553  Solano  Avenue  LAndscape  5-4313 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 


Excerpts  from  San  Francisco 
Police  Ordinances 

Sec.  1075:  Certificates  of  "Public 
Convenience  and  Necessity."  "Vehicles 
for  Hire." 

1.  Ihe  Police  Commission  has  the 
power  to  decide  if  "Public  Convenience 
and  Necessity"  calls  for  the  issue  of  a 
(new)  license  or  permit  for  a  motor 
vehicle  for  transporting  persons  for  hire. 

2.  The  Commisison  makes  the  decision 
after  taking  into  consideration  all  facts 
which  it  considers  pertinent  or  proper, 
hut  the  Commissioners  must  specifically 
find  for  the  applicant  in  the  following 
points  before  granting  the  permit. 

A.  That  the  applicant  is  financially 
responsible. 

B.  That  the  person,  firm  or  corpora- 
tion (already)  holding  permits  or  li- 
censes for  the  operation  of  motor  vehi- 
cles for  hire  are  under  efficient  manage- 
ment and  earning  a  fair  and  reasonable 
return  on  their  capital  devoted  to  such 
services. 

C.  That  persons,  firms  or  corpora- 
tions holding  permits  or  licenses  for  the 
operation  of  the  same  class  of  vehicles 
for  which  the  application  is  being  made 
are,  under  normal  conditions,  inade- 
quatelv  serving  the  public. 

0.  That  the  applicant  has  complied 
with  the  provisions  of  the  Municipal 
Code  and  (or)  State  or  Federal  laws 
apiilicable   to  the   proposed   operation. 

3.  The  Police  Commission  does  not 
have  to  decide : 

A.  The  question  of  "Public  Conven- 
ience and  Necessity"  in  the  case  of: 
Limousines,  taxis,  jitney  busses  or  sight- 
seeing busses,  as  to  number,  color,  etc., 
actually  operating  in  February  1932,  or 

B.  in  the  case  of  vehicles  operating 
under  a  certificate  of  "Public  Conven- 
ience and  Necessity"  issued  by  the  Rail- 
road Commission  of  the  State  of  Cali- 
fornia. 

4.  The  applicant  deposits  $15.00  with 
his  application  and  the  Commission  ad- 
\ertises  notice  for  three  days  in  the  offi- 
cial newspaper. 

5.  If  service  by  such  vehicle  is  aban- 
doned for  ten  days  the  permit  ma\-  be 
revoked. 

6.  Permits  granted  are  transferable 
only  on  consent  of  the  Police  Commis- 
sion after  written  request  for  such  trans- 
fer. 

Sec.  1080:  Bonds,  Insurance  Policies. 
Filed   with   Police   Commission. 

1.  Either  a: 

A.  "Policy  of  Insurance"  or 

B.  A  "Bond"  made  out  in  the  amount, 
and  in  the  form  approved  by  the  Police 
Commission,  and  kept  in  full  force  and 
effect  during  entire  period  of  permit,  is 
mandatorv. 


MERRY   CHRISTMAS   FROM 

Georgette  Cunningham  -  Antiques 

We    Wish    to    Buy    old    linens,    lace,    bric-a-brac 
1520   Solano    Ave.  LAndscape   6-7434 

ALBANY  CALIFORNIA 


LIN   FA  CAFE 

CHOP   SUEY 
1403  Solano  Avenue 


CALIFORNIA 


LAndscape  4-2636  Res.:   BErkeley  4-7569 

Dr.   Raymond   L.  Chan  -  Dent'isi 

Office   Hours  2-6      .      .      Sat.  9  -  12,  2  -  6 

Evenings    by   Appointment 

333    SAN    PABLO    AVENUE 

EL   CERRITO  CALIFORNIA 

RAY'S 

HOUSE   OF  QUALITY  AUTOMOBILES 

Cash    for   Your  Car 

LAndscape   4-3831     -     LAndscape   4-3832 

540   SAN    PABLO   AVENUE 

EL   CERRITO  CALIFORNIA 

G.  M.  STIMSON 

REALTOR 

"Bay*s   Best  Buys" 

943   San    Pablo    Ave  LAndscape    5-6747 

ALBANY  CALIFORNIA 

LAndscape    5-6280 

Golden  Gate  Stucco  and   Building 
Materials  Co.,   Inc. 

Manufacturers    of 

EXTERIOR  AND   INTERIOR  STUCCO 

READY  -  MIX 

Brighton    and    Masonic    Avenues 
ALBANY  CALIFORNIA 


F.  G.  WOOL  PACKING 
CO.,  INC. 


2296  A  Center  Road 
San  Jose,  California 


Phone  LA.  4-1042 

THE  KOUNTRY  BOYS 

MOTOR  KAR 

COMPANY 


1626  San  Pablo  Avenue 
EL  CERRITO,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  54 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


WELLS  P. 

GOODENOUGH 

INC. 

Contractors 


P.  O.  Box  120 


Palo  Alto,  California 


Ladies:  Mon.,  Tues.,  Wed.  and  Thurs. 
Men:  Fri.,  Sat.  and  Sun. 

• 

CASTRO  ROCK 

STEAM  BATHS 

• 

Hygiene  Beneficial 
for  Health 

• 

open  Daily   10  A.M.  to   10  P.M. 
Sundays  9  A.M.  to     4  P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 

APPOINTMENT 

• 

Phone  UNderhill   1-5995 
582   Castro   (Bet.   28th   and    19th  Sts.) 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 


2.  The  section  .specifies  the  minimum 
amount  of  recovery  in  such  "Policy  of 
Insurance"  or  such  "Bond." 

Minimum  amount  to  be  recovered 
under  this  section: 

1.  $5000.00:  For  the  injury  or  death 
to  one  in  any  one  accident. 

2.  $10,000.00:  For  injury  to  two  or 
more,  or  death  to  two  or  more,  in  any 
one  accident. 

3.  $500.00:  For  injury  or  destruction 
of  property  in  any  one  accident. 

4.  $20,000.00 :  For  vehicles  having  a 
capacity  of  ten  or  more. 

5.  $10,500.00:  If  one  vehicle  only  is 
offered  for  hire. 

5.  $25,000.00:  If  2-5  vehicles  are  of- 
fered for  hire. 

7.  $50,000.00:  If  6-20  vehicles  are 
offered  for  hire. 

8.  $75,000.00:  If  21-60  vehicles  are 
offered  for  hire. 

9.  $100,000.00:  If  61-100  vehicles  are 
offered  for  hire. 

10.  $125,000.00:  If  100-up  vehicles 
are  offered  for  hire. 

11.  If  there  is  a  seating  capacity  of 
more  than  ten  persons  this  graduating 
scale  shall  be  doubled. 

12.  All  "policies"  and  "bonds"  shall 
contain  a  provision  for  a  continuing  lia- 
bility thereunder  up  to  the  full  amount 
of  the  penalty  thereof,  notwithstanding 
any  recovery  thereon. 

13.  It  shall  be  unlawful  to  operate 
any  vehicle  without  having  a  "policy"  or 
"bond,"  as  described  in  this  section,  in 
full  force  and  effect  at  all  times  during 
the  operation  of  such  vehicles. 

Sec.  1081:  Statement  to  be  filed  with 
Police  Commission. 

1.  This  statement  must  be  sworn  to. 

2.  Must  be  filed  not  later  than  the 
first  week  of  July. 

3.  Must  set  forth  all  permits  held  and 
specify  a  full  compliance  with  all  mu- 
nicipal, state  or  federal  laws  governing 
the  operation  of  such  vehicles. 


MYSTERIOUS  RATTLES 

In  the  all-steel  automobile  body  noises 
due  to  looseness  are  likely  to  be  harder 
to  find,  points  out  the  National  Automo- 
bile Club.  Metal  parts  and  large  panels 
are  likely  to  serve  as  transmission  lines, 
carrying  the  noise  from  its  point  of  origin 
to  qin'te  another  part  of  the  machine.  The 
noise  that  you  cannot  locate  alone  may 
be  easier  to  find  it  you  have  someone  else 
drive  the  car  while  you  concentrate  upon 
finding  the  cause. 


ALEXANDER 
SANITARIUM,  INC. 


Ralston  Blvd. 
Belmont,  California 


Phone  LYtell  3-2316 

BUENA  CAMPBELL 
SANITARIUM 


Laurel  and  Hill  Street 
BELMONT,  CALIFORNIA 


E.  T.  HAAS 
COMPANY 


GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 


Specializing 
Pipe  Line  Construction 


Belmont,  California 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  55 


Diamond  3-5671 

J.  E.  French  Company 

DODGE  AND  PLYMOUTH 
Dodge  Job  Rated  Trucks 

327  LoRTON  Avenue 
BURLINGAME,  CALIFORNIA 


Diamond  3-2761 

WILLIAM  &  BURROWS, 
INC. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

10  California  Drive 
BURLINGAME,  CALIFORNIA 


O'NEILL  LUMBER 
COMPANY 

"For  a  Square  Deal 
Call  O'Neiir 

966  Bransten  Road 
SAN  CARLOS,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  EMerson   6-4679 

CURRIE  MANUFACTURING  CO. 


2426  EL  CAMINO  REAL 


REDWOOD   CITY 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone    6891 


DELANO 


YELLO  CAB  CO. 

24-HOUR  SERVICE 

10191/2  MAIN  STREET 

CALIFORNIA 


LOVELESS  TAKES  NEW  POST 

Theodore  Loveless,  who  was  a  field 
representative  for  the  Traffic  Division  of 
the  International  Association  of  Chiefs  of 
Police  for  14  years,  has  been  appointed 
assistant  director  in  charge  of  extension 
services  of  the  Traffic  Institute  of  North- 
western University,  Evanston,  111. 

Mr.  Loveless  assumed  his  new  duties 
(October  1st,  according  to  Franklin  M. 
Kreml,  director  of  the  Institute. 

As  head  of  the  Institute's  extension 
program,  Mr.  Loveless,  through  field 
consultation  on  traffic  organizational,  ad- 
ministrative, and  training  matters,  will 
assist  graduates  and  their  departments  to 
achieve  maximum  utilization  of  the  train- 
ing received  at  the  Institute. 

A  former  member  of  the  Indiana  State 
Police,  Mr.  Loveless  joined  the  lACP 
Traffic  Division  in  1938  after  his  gradu- 
ation from  Harvard's  Bureau  of  Traffic 
Research  (now  at  Yale  University). 

He  served  as  ^Vest  Coast  field  repre- 
sentative for  the  lACP  Traffic  Division 
until  January  1,  1951,  when  he  resigned 
to  become  director  of  public  safety  for 
the  L'niversity  of  Washington  in  Seattle. 
In  this  capacity  he  directed  the  establish- 
ment of  the  University's  police  force  and 
served  as  civil  defense  director. 

In  the  Spring  of  1952  he  rejoined  the 
staff  of  the  lACP  Traffic  Division  of 
Evanston. 

Among  the  police  departments  whose 
traffic  supervision  programs  Mr.  Loveless 
has  helped  reorganize  for  the  lACP 
Traffic  Division  are:  Knoxville  and 
Memphis,  Tenn. ;  Los  Angeles,  Oak- 
land, San  Francisco,  San  Diego,  Stock- 
ton and  Palo  Alto,  Calif.;  Portland, 
Ore.;  Phoenix,  Ariz.;  Boise,  Idaho,  and 
the  L'tah  Highway  Patrol. 

Mr.  Loveless  served  36  months  in  the 
Army  in  World  War  II,  engaged  pri- 
marily in  traffic  and  transportation  work 
in  Africa,  Sicily,  France,  and  Germany. 
He  held  the  rank  of  major  when  released 
from  active  duty.  He  is  a  graduate  of 
Indiana  State  College. 


PROLONGS  THE  MILEAGE 

Highly  recommended  by  motor  car 
experts  is  the  practice  of  allowing  the 
service  station  to  check  the  tires  every 
five  thousand  miles  to  see  if  front  and 
rear  tires  should  be  switched,  and 
whether  the  same  thing  should  be  done 
to  those  on  the  right  and  left  sides  of  the 
car,  reports  the  National  Automobile 
Club.  It  is  a  way  of  prolonging  tire 
mileages  that  never  occurs  to  many  mo- 
torists. 


Thirty  Years  .  . . 

• 
Same  Trademark  .  .  . 

• 
Sa7}ie  Ownership  . . . 

• 

GRAN  PANADERIA 
Y  REPOSTERIA 

LA  ESPERANZA 

Telephone  MAdison  9-0849 
507  North  Main  Street 

La  Antiguedad  Nudestro 
Negocio  Gara>itiza  La  Mercaucia 


STATE  MARKET 

YOL'NG  BROS. 

GROCERIES 
MEATS 
FRUITS 

AND 

VEGETABLES 


1201  Jefferson  Street 

Delano,  California 

Telephone  982-J 


Page  56 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


Office  Phone  988 

NEWTON  DRILLING 
COMPANY 

Max  A.  Newton 


430  West  Elm  Street 
COALINGA,  CALIFORNIA 


PLEASE   MENTION  THAT 

YOU   SAW  THEIR  AD  IN 

THE  POLICE  AND  PEACE 

OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


POLICE   BOOKS   FOR   BOTH 
RANK  AND   FILE 

Abnormal  Psychology,  Landis. 

Accident  Investigation  Manual, 
Northwestern  University. 

Code  of  Civil  Procedure. 

Criminal  Evidence,  Fricke. 

Charter  of  the  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco. 

Criminal  Interrogation,  Inbeau. 

California  General  Laws. 

Criminology,  Taft. 

Distribution  of  Police  Patrol  Force, 
Wilson. 

Delinquency  Control,  Carr. 

Evidence    Handbook,   Kreml. 

Elements  of   Police  Science,   Perkins. 

Fire  Ordinances. 

Health  Ordinances. 

Homicide  Investigation,  Synder. 

Municipal  Police  Admintration,  Insti- 
tute of  Training  in  M.  A. 

Motor  Vehicle  Act. 

New  Lights  on  Delinquency  and  Its 
Treatment,   Healy  and  Bronner. 

Police  Ordinances. 

Police  Records,  Their  Installation  and 
Use,  AVilson. 

Police  S^'stems  of  the  United  States, 
Smith. 

Psychology  of  Normal  People,  Tiffin. 

Reprints  of  Excepts  from  the  F.  B.  I. 
Law  Enforcement  Bulletins. 

Red  Cross  First  Aid  Manual. 

Rules  and  Regulations  of  the  Police 
Department. 

The  Art  of  Leadership,  Tead. 
Traffic  Ordinances. 

LTniform  Crime  Reports  (vearlv), 
F.  B.  I. 

U.  S.  Army  Drill  Manual. 

For  promotion  examinations  a  definite 
knowledge  of  the  Charter,  the  Municipal 
Police  Code  and  the  Traffic  Code  of  San 
Francisco,  the  Rules  and  Regulations  of 
the  San  Francisco  Police  Department 
and  the  Code  of  Civil  Procedure,  the 
Vehicle  Code  of  California  is  absolutely 
necessary. 

A  good  working  knowledge  of  the 
contents  of  the  bibliographical  authori- 
tative references  listed  above  will  be  ne- 
cessary in  determining  the  proper  an- 
swers to  pertinent  questions  on  general 
knowledge  of  police  departmental  func- 
tioning. 


TAKE  IT  EASY 

In  getting  out  of  mud  or  sand,  motor- 
ists should  know  that  it  is  important  to 
avoid  spinning  of  the  wheels,  to  prevent 
them  from  digging  in  deeply,  points  out 
the  National  Automobile  Club.  While 
it  may  be  necessary  to  use  low  gear,  do 
not  open  the  throttle  any  more  than  is 
absolutely  necessary. 


Phone   Fresno   2-6610 

Sam's  Luggage  &  Leather  Goods 

Complete    Line    of 

LUGGAGE  AND  LEATHER  GOODS 

Featuring  Skyway   and  Samsonite  Luggage 

Prince  Gardiner  and  Buxton  Wallets 

1928    MARIPOSA  FRESNO.    CALIF. 

Phone   2-5181 

Compliments    of 

GEO.  H.  SCIARONI 

Security    Bank    Building 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Phone   2-8608 

TOWER  SHOETORIUM 

SHOES   DYED.   CLEANED,   AND   SHINED 
Ladies   Purses    Redozeled 

925    OLIVE   STREET  FRESNO.   CALIF. 

Phone   2-0223 

PACIFIC   FURNITURE  CO. 

H.   Waxman,   Prop. 
1417    FULTON    STREET  FRESNO.    CALIF. 


Complete  FROZEN  FOOD 
Sales  and  Service 

LIBBY'S  •  BIRD'S  EYE  •  19c  Brand 

SUNKIST  •  WELCH  •  RUPERT'S 

BELLEANNA  •  SWANSON 

WESLEY 
DISTRIBUTING  CO. 

Frozen  Foods  -  Vegetables  ■  Meats 
and  Specialty  Items 

3101  Hamilton  Avenue 
FRESNO,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Service  6-9766  -  6-9767 


Phone  3-5251 

Compliments  of 

WESTERN  TRUCK 
LINES 


2440  Church 
FRESNO,  CALIFORNIA 


E.     REYES 

LABOR     SUPPLY 

• 

18  Sun  Street 

SALINAS,  CALIFORNIA 

i 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  57 


WAGON  WHEEL 
LIQUOR  STORE 

Charley    Buchholz 

Finest  IMPORTED  AND  DOMESTIC 
WINES  AND  LIQUORS 

W.   1st  St.  at  Harbor 
SANTA   ANA  CALIFORNIA 

M.   R.  R.  LIQUOR  STORE 

14761    So.   Harbor 

IMPORTED  AND  DOMESTIC 

WINES  AND  LIQUORS 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

STANTON   LIQUOR  STORE 

Kanshie  &  Katsuyo  Takayama 

10762  Chestnut  -    Home  Anaheim  2-8720 

STANTON  CALIFORNIA 

REFRIGERATED   FOOD  LOCKERS 

Wm.  Braun,  Owner.  Res.   Kimberly  2-5036 

MEATS  AND  FROZEN  FOODS 

316  East  Third  St.  -   Office  Kimberly  3-2617 

SANTA  AN.A  CALIFORNIA 

Black  &  White  Roadside  Market 

Cor.  Harbor  and  Garden  Grove 

FRUIT  -  VEGETABLES  -  GROCERIES 

COLD   DRINKS 

A.  Capasso  Co. 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

ACAPULCO  CAFE 

BEER  -  WINE 
MUSIC,  WEEK  ENDS 

2026  W.   Sth  Street 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 


EVE'S  NURSERY 


12102  Sth  Street 
SANTA  ANA 


KI   3-0929 

CALIFORNIA 


R  ADC  O 

MEATS  -  PROVISIONS 
Wholesale  -  Retail 


14745  Harbor  Blvd. 

SANTA  ANA 


Kimberly  2-5782 

CALIFORNIA 


EL  GORDITO  MARKET 

VEGETABLES    -   GROCERIES 
BEER  AND  WINE 


1711   West  Sth  St. 

SANTA  ANA 


Kimberly  2-944S 

CALIFORNIA 


BARRIOS  MARKET 

C.   G.    Barrios 
14712   S.   Harbor   Blvd. 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 


Kimberly  2-3531 

EXCELSIOR 
CREAMERY  COMPANY 

Also  .  .   .  Ice  Cream  at  Its  Best 
Zenith  2076  (No  Toll) 
C.  A.  Ranney,  President 

926  East  First  Street 
SANTA  ANA,  CALIFORNIA 


MOVE  YOUR  HOUSE,  MR. 

When  the  engineers  get  to  straighten- 
ing out  the  kinks  in  our  streets  ami  high- 
ua\s,  they  quite  often  find  that  their  new 
alignment  runs  right  through  a  cluster 
of  houses.  In  the  past  this  has  usually 
meant  that  the  occupants  would  have  to 
move  out,  and  the  houses  would  have  to 
be  razed  to  the  ground.  But  in  the  fu- 
ture, according  to  the  National  Automo- 
bile Club,  this  might  not  always  be  the 
case,  for  the  gadgeteers  have  moved  into 
the  scene  with  a  gadget  to  end  all  gad- 
gets, a  giant  contraption  that  can  pick  up 
a  thirty  by  sixty-foot  three  story  brick 
house  and  trundle  it  off  down  the  street 
without  even  making  a  crack  in  the  plas- 
ter, wihtout  even  rocking  that  old  rock- 
ing chair. 

With  the  new  contraption,  as  with  the 
older  methods  of  house  moving,  the  major 
part  of  the  work  comes  in  the  preliminary 
stages  when  the  house  is  being  prepared 
to  be  moved.  It  has  to  be  "cut  loose  from 
its  roots."  Electrical  and  plumbing  lines 
have  to  be  se\ered.  Large  holes  have  to 
be  cut  in  the  basement  walls  so  the  giant 
twelve-by-tvvelve  timbers  can  be  thrust 
through  to  carry  the  load.  Then  hy- 
draulic jacks  have  to  be  inserted  and  the 
whole  house  raised  up,  and  sometimes 
slid  along  a  little,  to  put  it  in  a  position 
to  be  carried  away.  And  then,  before  the 
actual  moving  takes  place,  the  course  of 
tra\el  has  to  be  surveyed  and  a  careful 
check  made  on  all  the  clearances. 

After  these  preliminaries  have  been 
taken  care  of,  the  gadget  takes  over. 
Backing  up  to  the  house,  it  slips  its  great 
U-shaped  prongs  around  the  walls,  strong 
steel  beams  are  slipped  into  place,  and 
then  the  giant  goes  rolling  off  on  its  ten- 
foot  diameter  tires,  carrying  the  house  off 
down  the  street  with  the  same  ease  that 
you  or  I  might  carry  off  the  family  gro- 
ceries in  the  family  car.  To  make  sure 
that  the  driver  gets  himself  into  no  tight 
corners,  a  man  walks  ahead  of  him  to 
survey  the  bumps  and  turnings  and  tele- 
phones his  findings  back  to  the  cab  by 
means  of  a  portable  telephone. 

Some  time  back  about  a  hundred  homes 
were  moved  in  Chelsea,  Massachusetts, 
by  this  new  method,  and  it  proved  so 
efficient  that  it  soon  should  be  being  put 
to  use  in  all  corners  of  the  countrv. 


THAT  INSIDE  DIRT 

That  discoloration  on  the  inside  of  a 
windshield  glass  usually  is  a  byproduct 
of  smoke,  according  to  the  National 
Automobile  Club.  The  moisture  in  the 
exhalation  of  a  cigar,  cigarette,  or  pipe 
tends  to  strike  against  the  glass  and  re- 
main there  in  the  form  of  a  discoloring 
mist. 


ALASKA  PIPE  &  SALVAGE  CO. 

SHIP   SUPPLIES 

2121    WEST   ANAHEIM  STREET 

LONG    BEACH  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  9-4856       Malvina  P.   (Mama)   St.  Clair 

St.  Clair's  Drive-In   Restaurant 

CAR   SERVICE     -     COFFEE    SHOP 

DINING   ROOM 

.   .    .  SAZARAC   ROOM   .   .   . 

(Famous  for  its  Ramos  Gin  Fizz  and 
Sazarac    Cocktails) 

4401    EAST   PACIFIC   HIGHWAY 

LONG   BEACH  CALIFORNIA 

SOUTHERN   MOTOR  INN 

ROOMS     -     APARTMENTS 
M.   C.    Hall     -     Phone   60260 

940   West    Pacific    Coast    Highway 
LONG  BEACH  CALIFORNIA 


YOUNG'S  TURKEYS 

BROAD-BREASTED    BRONZE 
"The   Very    Best" 

3001    W.   First    St.  Kimberly   3-1S23 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  6-0567 

HONOLULU 
MOTEL 

Bill  Hatch 
G.  I.  Owned  and  Operated 

Sleep  on  a  Beauty  Rest 


9012  Pacific  Coast 

Highway 

LONG  BEACH 


Page  58 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.   1952  -  Jan.   1953 


CLOVIS   FRUIT  COMPANY 


CLOVIS 


CALIFORNIA 


VIC'S  COFFEE  SHOP 


235  Beachwood 

PINEDALE 


Phone  7-4253 

CALIFORNIA 


N  A  C  H  O  '  S 

ENCHILADAS  -  TACOS 

American   and   Spanish   Dishes 

BEER  -  SOFT  DRINKS 


472  West  Minaret 
PINEDALE 


Phone  7-0704 

CALIFORNIA 


GEO.  VANDERLAM  DAIRY 

NORWALK      CALIFORNIA 

SHELL  OIL  PRODUCTS 
Expert  Lubrication 

LLOYD'S 

SPANISH  AND  AMERICAN  FOOD 

Phone  326-113 

Foothill  Blvd.  &   Central   Ave. 

UPLAND  CALIFORNIA 

BENEDICT  MARKET 

COMPLETE  LINE  OF  MEATS 
AND  GROCERIES 

875  East  Mill  Street 

We    now    give    CROWN    TRADING    STAMPS— 

1    Stamp  for  each   10c  Purchase 

FREE  PARKING  AT  SIDE  AND  REAR 

SEMRAU'S  FOOD  MARKET 

Open  Daily  and  Sundays 
357   Highland  Ave.  Phone  5-9128 

DESERT  CAFE 

WE  SPECIALIZE  IN  SPANISH  FOOD 
LUNCHEON  -  DINNER  -  SANDWICHES 
DRAFT  BEER  -  WINES  -  SOFT  DRINKS 

Highway  395 
ADELANTO  CALIFORNIA 

ORO  GRANDE  CAFE 

Open  6  A.M.  to   10:00  P.M. 

DINNERS  AND  SHORT  ORDERS 

BANQUET  ROOM  -  BEER 


ORO  GRANDE 


Phone  Victorville  5-2237 


CALIFORNIA 


JERRY'S  OASIS 

SPANISH  FOODS   OUR  SPECIALTY 
COCKTAILS 

Corner  Highway  395  and   Duchess 
Phone  62301 

ADELANTO  CALIFORNIA 


LOCK  YOUR  CAR 

Approximately  467  automobiles  are 
stolen  every  week  in  the  year  according 
to  F.B.I,  records  and,  with  the  e.xcep- 
tion  of  towns  vmder  25,000  population, 
car  theft  is  on  the  increase. 

Here  are  some  suggestions  from  the 
National  Automobile  Club  that  will 
help  the  motorist  keep  his  car  from  being 
stolen : 

First,  always  lock  the  car  if  planning 
to  leave  it  for  any  length  of  time.  In 
addition  to  locking  the  doors  and  taking 
the  ignition  keys,  the  motorist  should 
also  lock  the  trunks.  Thieves  in  many 
localities  make  it  a  practice  just  to  take 
tires  and  tools  which  are  found  in  un- 
locked luggage  compartments  or  trunks. 

Some  motorists  when  shopping  have  a 
habit  of  leaving  their  cars  unlocked  for 
a  moment  to  run  into  a  store  and  pick 
up  some  article,  planning  to  be  away 
from  their  cars  for  but  a  brief  moment. 
During  the  Christmas  holiday  season, 
passing  thieves  are  tempted  by  packages 
which  can  be  quickly  and  easily  taken 
from  the  unlocked  car.  Rifling  of  cars  by 
roving  theives  is  common  in  many  cities 
causing  tourists  to  lose  luggage,  clothes 
and  packages.  When  there  are  anv  pack- 
ages in  the  car,  the  wise  driver  will  keep 
it  locked  when  he  parks,  even  though  he 
plans  to  be  away  but  for  a  few  minutes. 

It  is  a  good  idea  for  the  driver  to 
park  his  car  close  to  his  home  at  night. 
If  possible,  it  should  be  parked  in  the 
garage  or  at  least  in  one's  own  yard.  If 
the  motorist  has  no  garage  or  yard,  he 
should  leave  it  in  front  of  his  home.  In 
crowded  or  apartment  areas  this  may  be 
difficult.  In  such  event  the  safe  minded 
driver  will  park  as  near  a  street  light  as 
possible. 

^Vhen  traveling  out  of  town,  the  mo- 
torist should  keep  his  parked  automobile 
as  close  to  him  as  possible  and  to  keep  it 
locked  at  all  times.  The  added  time  it 
takes  a  stranger  in  town  to  alert  the  local 
police  provides  good  get-a-way  time  for 
the  thieves. 

If  motorists  will  make  it  more  difficult 
for  the  thieves  by  taking  added  pre- 
cautions, they  can  reduce  the  number  of 
cars  stolen  every  week. 


THE  METEOR  CRATER 

Meteor  Crater,  located  nventy-one 
miles  west  of  ^Vinslow  and  seven  miles 
south  of  U.  S.  Highway  No.  66  in  Ari- 
zona, is  reported  by  the  National  Auto- 
mobile Club  to  have  been  formed  by  the 
landing  of  a  huge  meteor.  It  is  regarded 
as  one  of  the  world's  wonders. 


VAN'S 
Cocktails  atid  Food 


497  S.  Sierra  Ave. 
Phone  9406 


APPLE  VALLEY  INN 

Apple  Valley,  California 
All  Year  Resort 

SWIMMING  -  RIDING  HORSES 
GOLFING 

FINE  FOOD  -  COCKTAILS 


V.  MARKET 

QUALITY  MEATS  AND 
GROCERIES 

Popular  Brands  of 
BEER  AND  WINES 


' 


LAUNDERETTE 


3031/2  Second  Street 
OcEANSiDE,  California 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  59 


NU-WEST  HOTEL 

TRANSIENT  AND  PERMANENT 

Seventh  and  "D"  Streets 

RIGHT  DOWN  TOWN 

VICTORXILLE  CALIFORNIA 

YOUR  MONEY  BUYS  MORE 
at 

THE   FURNITURE  CENTER 

Moved  to  986  E.  Base  Line 

Phone  825582 
Jack   H.  Greenland^   Owner 


LA  TOLTECA 

M.  J.  Ciriza,  Prop. 

MEXICAN  FOOD   PRODUCTS 

579  No.  Mt.  Vernon 


M  &  W  VARIETY  STORE 

GENERAL  MERCHANDISE 
578  N.  Mt.  Vernon 


LLOYD'S  RESTAURANT 

SPANISH  AND  AMERICAN 
Hours:  5:00  P.M.  and  3:00  A.M. 

FOOTHILL  BLVD.  AND  CENTRAL  AVE. 

UPLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone    Beacon   682  1 

THE  DAVIS -BROWN  CO. 

TELEVISION  AND   HOME   APPLIANCES 

PHILCO       •       WESTINGHOUSE 

DUMONT      •       MAYTAG 

Hugh  L.   Davis    -    Chisholm   Brown 

1885   HARBOR  BOULEVARD 

COSTA  MESA  CALIFORNIA 


Seals  Sales  and  Service 
tires  -  batteries  -  auto 

PARTS  and  ACCESSORIES 

USED    CARS 

Specialized  Lubrication 

Pick  Up  and  Delivery  5  Mile  Radius 

Hiway  41  Elm  Avenue 

ROAD  SERVICE  -  EASTON 

Phone  3-0656 


IDLE   HANDS   SWELL 
TRAFFIC  TOLL 

1.  Don't  make  the  other  fellow  guess; 
give  a  hand  signal  and  give  it  correctly. 

2.  The  driver  behind  you — unless  he 
is  a  fortune  teller  or  a  first  class  mind 
reader — has  no  definite  means  of  know- 
ing what  you  are  going  to  do,  so:  "Give 
him  a  hand." 

3.  To  avoid  pileups  at  stopping  places 
the  law  says  we  must  gi\e  notice  of  what 
we  are  going  to  do  at  least  fifty  feet 
ahead  of  the  place  at  which  we  wish  to 
stop  or  turn.  The  law  also  states  that 
drivers,  before  stopping,  starting  or  turn- 
ing their  cars,  must  see  that  same  may 
be  done  in  safety  to  themselves  and  to 
the  traveling  public. 

4.  Under  the  provisions  of  the  Vehi- 
cle Act  only  three  arm  signals  are  recog- 
nized: 1.  The  Horizontal — with  the  left 
arm  and  hand  extended  horizontally,  for 
left  hand  turns ;  2.  The  Verticle — with 
the  left  hand  and  arm  extended  upward 
beyond  the  left  side  of  the  vehicle,  for 
right  hand  turns ;  3.  The  Downward — 
with  the  left  hand  and  arm  extended 
downward  beyond  the  left  side  of  the 
vehicle,  for  sudden  stopping  or  decrease 
of  speed. 

5.  A  "waving"  of  the  left  hand,  indi- 
cating to  move  forward,  or  to  denote  a 
backward  or  a  swerve  movement,  is  not 
legal. 

6.  A  "last  second"  use  of  the  legal 
hand  signals  is  no  defense  in  actionable 
suits  for  damages.  The  provisions  of  the 
Act  are  definite  in  this  matter  and  re- 
quire: "signal  be  given  continuously  dur- 
ing the  last  fifty  feet  before  stopping  or 
turning." 

7.  Failure  to  give  the  mandatory  hand 
signals  is  culpable  laziness.  Hand  signals 
are  easily  given  and  there  is  no  reason  for 
the  common  scene  of  five  or  six  automo- 
biles, at  a  crossing,  with  damaged  fend- 
ers and  radiators,  because  the  lazy  driver 
at  the  head  of  the  line  failed  to  give  the 
legally  required  signal  with  his  idle  left 
hand. 


VISOR  WORKS  TWO  WAYS 

Many  a  motorist  apparently  forgets 
that  the  sun  visor  on  his  car  works  two 
ways,  that  it  may  be  adjusted  to  keep  out 
the  sun  rays  coming  from  the  side  as  well 
as  those  coming  through  the  windshield. 
Cross  rays,  points  out  the  National  Au- 
tomobile Club,  are  just  as  annoying  at 
certain  times  as  those  that  come  directly 
from  the  front. 


TAYLORS 
GOLDENWEST  TURKEYS 

FRYERS  -  DUCKLINGS 

ROASTERS  AND  EGGS 

Selected   Antiques 

7011   Garden  Grove  Blvd. 

Phone  Westminster  2923   or  4525 

WESTMINSTER  CALIFORNIA 


PLEASE   MENTION  THAT 

YOU  SAW  THEIR  AD  IN 

THE   POLICE  AND   PEACE 

OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


L.   F.  WILL  ■  Prolimn  Motor  Oil 

RECLAIMED   OIL 
Plant:   17th  St.  and  Verano  Road 

116  WILSON  STREET 

MIDWAY  CITY  CALIFORNIA 

CASALETTI'S  CAFE 

GOOD  FOOD  -  BEER  AND  WINE 
DANCING  FRIDAY  and  SATURDAY 

West  Highland  Ave.,  Vi  MUe  West 
of  Etiwanda  Avenue 


ETIWANDA 


Phone  416 


CALIFORNIA 


"LE  .  BELS" 

what   the   Name   Implies — in  Trailer   Parks 

2200   West   Front   Street 
SELMA  CALIFORNIA 


Bloomington   Building  Supply 

DOORS  AND  WINDOWS 
Largest  Selection  in  This  Area 

550  E.  Valley  Blvd.  Phone  Colton  227 

BLOOMINGTON  CALIFORNIA 


Dill  Lumber  Company 

A  Complete  Line  of 
BUILDING  MATERIALS 

440  West  Valley  Blvd. 
BLOOMINGTON,  CALIFORNIA 
Phones:  Colton  1816;  Fontana  6679 


Page  60 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Dec.  1952  -  Jan.  1953 


LUPRIN  TIRE  &  RECAPPING  CO. 

13021    SOUTH   CENTURY   BOULEVARD 

GARDEN   GROVE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    709 

GROVERS'  LAUNDRY  &  U-WASH 

FLUFF   DRY     -     FLAT   WORK    -     DYEING 

13051    WEST   AVENUE 
GARDEN   GROVE  CALIFORNIA 


Phone    7094 


Hiway  66 


"WESTWARD  HO"  MOTEL 

KITCHENETTE   APARTMENTS 
$3.50  Single    -    $5.00  Double 

Harry   Neiderman 

880  WEST  FOOTHILL  BOULEVARD 

FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone   4166 

HOUSE  OF  TELEVISION 

FRANCHISED   SYLVANIA   DEALER 

SALES     -     SERVICE 

"Where   Quality   Reigns" 

Jack  L.   Hull 

228   West    Foothill    Boulevard 

FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  3648 

ILLINI    MOTEL 

Clean — All  Modern  Furnished 
Apartments 

Permanent  and  Transient  Guests 

Reasonable  Weekly  and  Monthly 

Rates 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  L.  C.  Pfulb 

266  West  Foothill  Boulevard 
FONTANA,  CALIFORNIA 


FONTANA  BAKERY 

FANCY  CAKES  &  PASTRY 


108  East  Arrow 
FONTANA,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  3301 


MEET  THE  NEW  CHAMP 

(Continued  from  page  i) 

the  most  part,  it  was.  For  the  most  part, 
we  say.  We  have  a  sneaking  hunch  that 
we  had  the  best  of  the  holiday  season, 
thanks  to  your  presence.  We  know  what 
some  of  you  went  through  during  those 
hectic  two  weeks. 

The  highway  patrolmen,  for  instance. 
You  don't  have  to  tell  us  that  you  are 
glad  the  holidays  are  over.  ^Ve  saw  what 
kind  of  a  hellish  time  you  had  every  time 
we  picked  up  a  paper  and  we  sympa- 
thized with  you.  But  we  want  you  to 
know  we  appreciated  your  efforts.  If  you 
had  not  been  around  there  would  have 
been  more  of  us  on  those  gurneys  in  the 
morgue. 

And  then  there  was  the  group  of  dep- 
uties from  the  Santa  Clara  County  Sher- 
iff's office  who  had  to  go  out  to  Garden 
Gate  Village  in  Cupertino  the  day  before 
Christmas.  The  memory  of  those  three 
little  kids  couldn't  have  been  pleasant 
the  next  day. 

Of  course  there  was  the  chief  of  police 
in  Arcadia  who  had  the  little  old  lady 
who  robbed  banks  in  the  jug  on  Christ- 
mas day.  His  feelings  must  have  been 
mixed  as  he  sat  down  to  his  turkey. 

Yes,  it  was  a  tough  year  for  us  all 
right.  But  we  still  think  we  had  the 
best  of  the  holidays.  Frankly,  we  had 
nothing  but  a  good  time.  We  hope  that 
most  of  you  did.  Anyway,  we  have  a  new 
j'ear  growing  up.  And  you  want  to  keep 
an  eye  on  that  kid.  Don't  let  anyone 
tout  you  off  him.  He  has  the  makings 
of  a  real  champ.  Knowing  he's  around 
makes  it  easier  to  wish  a  "Happy  New 
Year"  to  all  of  you. 


UNCLEVER  AND  COSTLY 

"Flashy"  drivers  think  it  is  clever  to 
hold  the  car  in  second  gear  until  high 
speeds  are  reached,  points  out  the  Na- 
tional Automobile  Club.  Such  flashiness 
costs  them  dearly  in  gasoline,  for  the 
amount  of  gasoline  consumed  is  about 
double  that  consumed  under  ordinary 
driving  conditions.  Shift  into  high  before 
reaching  twenty-five  miles  per  hour,  top. 


SPEED   KILLS 

Speed  is  a  subtle  and  sudden  killer, 
warns  the  National  Automobile  Club. 
If  your  engine  has  power,  let  it  be  power 
in  reserve.  If  the  highway  is  wide  and 
smooth,  use  it  but  don't  abuse  it.  Don't 
give  this   killer  a  chance  to  kill  you. 

LOOK   BOTH  WAYS 

Look  both  ways  before  you  cross  the 
street,  advises  the  National  Automobile 
Club. 


HELEN'S  GROCERY 

THornwall  3-1370 

CALIFORNIA 


1987    Ashby   Ave 
BERKELEY 


WELL'S  PATIO  NURSERY 

1213   WEST    OLYMPIC    BOULEVARD 

MONTEBELLO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  TE.  4-9550 


A.  C.   Sandoval,  Prop. 


101   CLUB  CAFE 

Beer  and  Wine  -  Dancing  -  Good  Mexican  Food 

Always   a   hriendly   Weicome 

1521    East   Pacihc   Coast   Highway 

WILMlNCrON  CALIFORNIA 

TIA  JUANA  CAFE 

Mexican   Dinners    -    Orders    to   Take   Out    -    Beer 
and  wines    .   .   .   Jesus  Urrea,   Prop. 


1707  E.  Pacific  Coast 

WILMINGTON 


TE  4-9560 

CALIFORNIA 


DR.  YALE  BRODY 

127   East  Acacia 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-9539  C.   M  -'Johnnie"  Manetti 

WHITE  HOUSE  TAVERN 

COCKTAILS  AND   MIXED   DRINKS 

"Where   All   Friends   Meet" 

2132  Mariposa  Road    (Cor.  Mariposa  and 

Farmington  Roads)  Stockton,  Calif. 


GEORGE'S  SERVICE  STATION 

No.  Highway  "99"  at  Sangulnetti  Lane 

STOCKTON  CALIFORNIA 


BOLTON    WHITE 

ARCHITECT 

JACK    HERMANN 

ARCHITECT 


75  Castle  Street 
SAN   FRANCISCO 


sutler   1-2334 

CALIFORNA 


Phone  PRospect   5-5244 

STANWAY  MOTORS 

San  Francisco's  Largest  Used  Car  Dealers 

Complete  Stock  of  Late  Model  Cars 

ALL  MAKES   .   .   .  ALL   BODY   STYLES 

Easy  Convenient   Terms 

1919  Van  Ness  Ove. — Full  City  Block 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Paradise 
Cocktail  Lounge 

AND 

York  Club 

Bass  and  Sequestri,  Owners 

FOOD  AND  DRINK 

at  its  best 

4 16  Fifth  Street 

Eureka,  California 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


HUMBOLDT 
PLYWOOD  CORP. 


Douglas  Fir  Plywood 

Fir  Plywod  Exterior  and  Interior 


Fillmore  6-1234 

DITTO  AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 

Jack  Ditto,  Prprietor 


Areata,  California 


3131  Fillmore  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


FORD  MOTOR 
COMPANY 


• 


RICHMOND,  CALIFORNIA 


Sec.  34.66  P.  L.  &  R. 

U.   S.   POSTAGE 

PAID 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Permit  No.  3172 

Return  Portare  Guaranteed 
465  Tenth  Street,  San  Francisco  S 


^^^^^^^b 


^^111  fertile  future 


lVv]S&^9j5^ 


ON   GENERAL   SAVINGS  ACCOUNTS 

1^  COMPUTED  MONTHLY^ 


KiM][L 


THE    SAN    FRANCISCO    BANK 

TRUST    Inc.  Feb.  10. 1868 .  Member  Federal  Deposit  Insurance  Corp.    5A  VINGS 
526  California  Street  and  405  Montgornery  Street,  San  Francisco 


Parker  S.  Maddux,  President 


San  Francisco  27.  Cai. 


i 


Finer  Gas  Ranges 

O'Keefe  and  Merritt  Ranges 

A  Model  For  Every  Home 


962  Battery  Street 


Call  your  regular  dealer 


SAN  FRANCISCO  EDITION 


»  ^^_  ^   « 


OFFICER  OF  THE   MONTH 
See  Pages  2-3  and   13 


FEBRUARY,   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fillmore  6-1234 

DITTO  AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 

JACK  Ditto,  Prprietor 


3131  Fillmore  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


HUMBOLDT 
PLYWOOD  CORP. 


Douglas  Fir  Plywood 

Fir  Plyu'od  Exterior  and  Interior 


Areata,  California 


E5i  PEACE  OFFICERS 


(Copyright,  1931.  2-0  Publishing  Co.) 
Founded   1922 

Business  Office:  465  Tenth  Street 

San  Francisco  3,  California 

Phone  MArket  1-7110 

An  Independent  Journal  Published  Monthly,  Devoted  to 
the  Interests  of 

ALL  CALIFORNIA  AND  NEVADA  LAW 
ENFORCEMENT  AGENCIES 

'Published  Monthly  by 

Police  and  Peace  Officers'  Journal 

our  foreign  exchanges 

THE  GARDA  REVIEW     ....     2  Crow  St.,  Dublin.  Ireland 

ALERTA,  A.  V.  JUAREZ Desp.  6.  Mexico,  D.  F. 

REVISTA  DE  POLICIA 

Rioja,  666,  Buenos  Aires,  Republic  of  Argentine,  S.  A. 

CONSTABULARY  GAZETTE Belfast,  Ireland 

POLICE  NEWS New  South  Wales 

POLICE  JOURNAL Wellington,  New  Zealand 

WALTER  R.  HECOX Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION  TERMS— $5  a  year,  payable  in  advance;  25c 
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Post  Office  or  Express  Money  Order,  by  Registered  Letter,  or  by 
Pustage  Stamps  of  2-cent  denomination,  or  by  check. 

IMPORTANT  NOTICE— Do  not  subscribe  to  POLICE  PEACE 
OFFICERS'  JOURNAL  through  agents  unknown  to  you  personally, 
or  who  cannot  present  proper  credentials  on  our  stationery. 

ADVERTISING  RATES  on  application.  30 


EDGERTON 
BROTHERS 

LUMBER 
COMPANY 


White  Fir 

and 

Ponderosa  Pine 


Adin,  California 


I'lhruary   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  1 


Featured  in  This  Issue 

PAGE 

"Imasioii    from    ^^^ithi^" 3 

School  Opens  tor  S.P.D 4 

Mad  Dog  South  of  the  Slot 5 

By  ^Valter  R.  Hecox 

Associated   Public  Cflmniuiiications  Officers     .     .  6 

Police  Promotion  Examination  Questions     ...  7 

Keep  \'our  Driver  Dry 8 

Excerpts  from  San  Francisco  Police  Ordinances    .  8 

Sacramento  Traffic  Report 9 

Goodbye  Blue  Room 10 

Streamlined  for  Efficiency 11 

McCurry  Elected  CSAA  President 12 

Lagomarsino  Retires 12 

Officer  of    the    Month 13 

Progress   Report 14 

Detecti\e  Division 15 

Strei   Heads  State  Police 16 

Sacramento  Retirements 17 

Personal  Identification  in  Earh  America     ...  18 
By  B.  C.  Bridges 


Directory 


The  Editor  is  always  pleased  to  consider  articles  suitable  for  publication.  Con- 
tributions should  preferably  be  typewritten,  but  where  this  is  not  possible,  copy 
should  be  clearly  written.  Contributions  may  be  signed  with  a  "nom  de  plume," 
but  all  articles  must  bear  the  name  and  address  of  the  sender,  which  will  be 
treated  with  the  strictest  confidence.  The  Editor  will  also  be  pleased  to  consider 
photogxaphs  of  ofRcers  and  of  interesting  events.  Letters  should  be  addressed  to 
the  Editor. 


SAN  FRANCISCO  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

Hall  of  Justice,  Kearny  and  Washington  Streets 

Telephone  SUtter  1-2020 

Radio  Short  Wave  Call  KMA-438 


Mayor,  Hon.  Elmer  E.  Robinson 


POLICE  COMMISSIONERS 

Regular  Meetings,  Wednesday,  2:00  p.m.,  Hall  of  Justrce 

Washington  I.  Kohnke,  President 6S6  Sacramento  Street 

Henry  C.  Maginn 315  Montgomery  Street 

J.  Warnock  Walsh 160  Montgomery  Street 

Sergeant  John  T.  Butler,  Secretary 
Room  104,  Hall  of  Justice 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE Michael  Gaffev 

DEPUTY  CHIEF  OF  POLICE Bernard  J.  McDonald 

Chief  or  Inspectom James  ENCLitH 

Director  of  Traffic Jack  Ekeu 

Dept.  Sec't.  ..Captain  Michael  F.  Fftzpatrick  ...Hall  of  Justice 

District  Captains 

Central Daniel  McKlem 635  Washington  Street 

Southern Walter  Ames Fourth  and  Clara  Streets 

Mission Edward  Donohue 1240   Valencia    Street 

Northern Peter   Conroy 941    Ellis   Street 

Richmond Aldysius  O'Brien 451  Sixth  Avenue 

Ingleside Leo  Tackney Balboa  Park 

Taraval August  G.  Steffen 2348  Twenty-fourth  Avenue 

PoTRERO Ted  Terlau.  ..* 2300  Third  Street 

Golden  Gate  Park William  Danahy Stanyan  opp.  Waller 

Traffic Ralph  E.  Olstad Hall  of  Justice 

City  Prison Lt.  Walter  Thompson Hall  of  Justice 

Civilian  Defense George  Healt Hall  of  Justice 

Bur.  Inspectors Cornelius  Murphy Hall  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Personnel John   A.   Engler Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of 

Criminology Francis  X.  Latulipi H»ll  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Special  Services Otto  Meyer Hal!  of  Justice 

Director  of  Juvenile  Bureau 2475  Greenvrich  Street 

John  Meehan 

Director  -  Bureau  of  Criminal 

Information Lieut.  George  Hippely Hall  of  Justice 

Insp.  of  Schoou 

Traffic  Control Insp.  Thomas  B.  Tract 

Supervising  Captain 

OF  Districts Jeremiah  J.  Coughlin Hall  of  Justice 

Chinatown  Detail Lt.  H.  C.  Atkinson Hall  of  Justice 

Range  Master Pistol  Range,  Lake  Merced 

Emil  Dutil 


WKen  In  Trouble     Call  SlJtteY  hlO-lO 

YVhen    in   Doubt  Always  At  Your  Service 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL  AWARD 

Ql^rtiftral^  of  iH^rtt 

FOR  OUTSTANDING  SERVICE 


During  the  month  of  February,  Nineteen  Hundred  and  Fifty-three 

mfxtn  Sark  1.  (!ll?anpa 

SAN  FRANCISCO  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

combined  courage,  ingenuity,  preparation  and  intelligence  to  turn  a  difficult  situation 
into  the  outstanding  example  of  a  single  piece  of  police  work  to  take  place  in  the 
State  of  California  in  this  period. 

On  the  8th  day  of  February,  Nineteen  Hundred  and  Fifty-three,  Officer  Chaney,  tvhile 
patrolling  his  beat  along  Ocean  Beach,  heard  distress  calls  from  Barbara  Engs,  who 
had  been  swept  away  from  her  rubber  boat  and  out  to  sea  by  the  surf.  Officer  Chaney 
turned  his  horse  and,  disregarding  the  danger  to  himself,  rode  more  than  100  yards 
offshore  to  rescue  Miss  Engs. 

The  Journal  lauds  not  only  the  courageous  action  of  Officer  Chaney,  who  ivillingly 
risked  his  life  to  save  the  girl,  but  the  foresight  which  enabled  the  officer  to  train  his 
horse  to  enter  the  surf  in  preparation  for  such  an  emergency. 

In  recognition  of  this  outstanding  service  to  his  department,  his  profession  and  the 
people  of  the  State  of  California,  the  Police  and  Peace  Officers'  Journal  takes 
pleasure  in  presenting  him  with  this  Certificate  of  Merit. 

' Publisher 

Editor 


Fihruiiry   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  3 


"Efficient  Police 

Make  a  Land  of 

Peace" 


(Established  1922) 


The  Magazine 

Peace  Officers 

Read 

(Trade  Mark  Copyright) 


Vol.  XXVI 


FEBRUARY,  1953 


No.  4 


"INVASION  FROM  WITHIN" 


Jn  address  delivered  to  the  national 
convention  of  the  National  Automatic 
Merchandising  Association  at  the  Palmer 
House,  Chicago,  Illinois.  Mednesday . 
September  VI,  1952.  by  '('■  H.  Parker, 
Chief  of  Police,  Los  Angeles.  California. 


In  our  country's  176  years  of  exist- 
ence, it  has  been  subjected  many  times  to 
attack.  We  have  taken  no  joy  in  war- 
fare, but  as  enemies  appeared  we  have 
fought  .  .  .  we  have  paid  the  price  .  .  . 
and  we  ha\e  won  the  victory.  It  is  a 
comforting  thing  .  .  .  this  habit  of  win- 
ning. It  makes  easy  the  belief  that  we 
shall  always  win  .  .  .  that  we  are  a 
chosen  people  .  .  .  that  victory  forever  is 
a  sort  of  birthright  of  ours.  I  earnestly 
hope  it  is  so.  I  hope  we  represent,  as 
some  people  believe,  civilization's  pin- 
nacle. I  hope  the  hard  and  immutable 
rules  which  have  governed  other  civili- 
zations do  not  apply  to  us  .  .  .  that  even 
though  we  give  wa\-  to  weakness,  com- 
placency, and  corruption,  we  are  fore- 
destined  to  endure  to  the  end. 

Rotting  Timbers 

I  say  "I  hope  "  but  I  cannot  say  "I  am 
certain."  A  lifelong  pleasure  of  mine  has 
been  the  study  of  history  and  that  pur- 
suit is  not  conducive  to  shallow  opti- 
mism. Egypt,  Babylon,  Greece  and  Rome 
rose,  then  fell,  as  strength  gave  way  to 
weakness,  alertness  gave  way  to  compla- 
cency, and  \irtue  gave  way  to  corrup- 
tion. It  is  interesting,  and  perhaps  pro- 
ductive, to  recall  that  the  high  walls  of 
these  civilizations  were  never  toppled  by 
barbarians  from  without.  But  the  walls 
crumbled  into  rubble  and  the  enemy 
poured  through  when  barbarism  within 
rotted  the  moral  supporting  timbers. 

Today  America  faces  the  kind  of  at- 
tack which  destroyed  these  brave  civili- 
zations of  the  past.  We  face  a  three 
pronged  threat,  a  simultaneous  assault  in 
three  dimensions:  Armed  might  of  Rus- 


OUR  COVER 

Officer  Jack  E.  Chaney  of  the  San 
Francisco  Police  Department  ap- 
pears on  the  cover  of  the  Police 
.•iND  Peace  Officers'  Journal 
this  month  after  winning  the  Maga- 
zine's monthly  award  for  the  out- 
standing piece  of  police  work  in  the 
State  of  California. 

Officer  Chaney  is  shown  riding 
his  horse  beachward  after  being 
relieved  of  his  rescue  mission  by 
Officer  William  Becker,  a  former 
lifeguard,  and  Walter  Wehr,  chief 
lifeguard  at  Fleishhacker  Pool.  Since 
effecting  the  rescue  of  Barbara  Engs, 
a  17-year-old  El  Cerrito  high  school 
girl  who  had  been  swept  away  from 
a  rubber  boat  by  the  surf,  Chaney  has 
received  a  certificate  of  merit  from 
the  Police  and  Peace  Officers' 
Journal.  A  $50  United  States 
Savings  Bond  has  been  purchased  by 
the  Police  and  Peace  Officers' 
JfjURNAL  and  delivered  in  his  name 
to  the  San  Francisco  Police  Commis- 
sion who  will  present  it  to  him;  is 
being  considered  for  a  meritorious 
service  award  by  the  police  commis- 
sion. His  horse.  Bill,  has  been  pre- 
sented with  a  certificate  from  Pets 
Unlimited. 

Chaney's  ride  into  the  surf  was 
one  of  the  most  spectacular  individ- 
ual acts  to  be  contributed  by  a  Cali- 
fornia peace  officer  for  a  long  time. 
He  was  a  natural  choice  for  the  S50 
bond  award  and  the  certificate  of 
merit.  However,  the  act  which  wins 
the  bond  does  not  have  to  be  spec- 
tacular. Keep  us  informed  on  what 
you  and  your  friends  have  been  do- 
ing. Any  one  of  you  may  turn  up  a 
winner. 


.v;V;,  the  Communist  fifth  column  within 
our  borders,  and  organized  crime.  Let 
us  gauge  the  strength  of  these  enemies 
and  the  security  of  our  defense  against 
them. 

External  Danger 
To  speak  at  length  about  the  dangers 
presented  by  an  aggressively  militant 
Russia  is  scarcely  necessary  today.  The 
Russian  nation  presents  an  external  dan- 
ger, a  danger  that  can  be  clearly  defined 
and  squarely  faced.  Security  from  this 
threat  demands  a  protective  force  of  sol- 
diers and  rifles,  tanks  and  field  guns, 
naval  guns,  aircraft,  and  production  of, 
the  vast  supporting  paraphernalia  of 
modern  war.  \\'e  may  disagree  for  a 
time  about  the  necessary  size  of  armies, 
design  of  equipment,  or  level  of  produc- 
tion :  But,  you  may  be  certain,  as  in  the 
past,  America  will  armor  herself  and 
raise  her  walls  in  time  to  meet  these 
barbarians  from  without. 

No  Comic  Opera 

The  second  threat  is  posed  by  a  com- 
munist fifth  column  within  our  borders. 
By  force  and  violence  they  hope  to  de- 
stroy our  government  and  supplant  our 
ideals  with  an  alien  philosophy.  This 
threat,  more  insidious  than  invading 
armies,  is  dangerous  because  it  is  some- 
thing unique  in  our  experience.  During 
the  last  war  a  few  sympathizers  with 
the  Fourth  Reich  and  Imperial  Japan 
scored  some  minor  successes  within  this 
country.  However,  in  all  fairness  to  his- 
tory, we  cannot  recall  them  as  a  major 
threat  to  our  security.  They  furnished  as 
much  materials  to  our  screen  writers  as 
they  did  aid  to  our  enemy.  Compared 
with  the  disciplined  agents  of  Interna- 
tional Communism,  they  were  country 
bumpkins  cast  in  second  rate  Gilbert  and 
Sullivan.  The  danger  created  by  the 
communist  fifth  column  is  not  comic 
opera.  It  is  real  and  it  is  potent.  Its 
(Continued  on  page  22) 


Page  4 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

SCHOOL  OPENS  FOR  S.  P.  D. 


/•'<-/. 


ruary 


1953 


^Vithin  the  next  few  weeks  the  Sacra- 
mento Police  Department  will  open  a 
full  time  police  academy,  offering  new- 
comers and  old  timers  on  the  force  a 
constant  service  training  program. 

The  start  of  the  academy  will  repre- 
sent a  major  victory  for  Chief  James  V. 
Hicks,  who  has  advocated  the  idea  for 
se\eral  years. 

The  school  will  be  organized  accord- 
ing to  plans  developed  by  the  Federal 
Bureau  of  Investigation.  Sergeant  H. 
D.  Meredith  will  be  the  supervisor, 
working  under  the  direction  of  Captain 
Walter  C.  Sked. 


Chief  Hicks 

Year  Around  Operation 

It  will  be  operated  the  year  around 
and  each  officer,  with  the  exception  of  the 
real  old  timers,  will  be  required  to  at- 
tend a  two-week  course  every  six  months. 
All  phases  of  law  enforcement,  includ- 
ing public  relations,  will  be  taught. 

In  addition  to  the  regular  courses 
which  will  be  offered  to  the  police  and 
civil  defense  groups  the  academy  will 
feature  special  training  in  radiological 
defense  and  traffic  control  under  emer- 
gency conditions. 

FBI  Graduates 

The  instructors  will  include  the  super- 
vising officers  of  all  divisions  in  the  po- 
lice department  and  other  officers  who 
have  had  specialized  training  in  various 
phases  of  law  enforcement.  Several  of 
the  men  who  will  be  instructors,  includ- 
ing  the  chief  himself,  are  graduates  of 


the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  Na- 
tional Academy  in  Washington,  D.  C. 
FBI  agents,  members  of  the  state 
bureau  of  criminal  identification  and  in- 
vestigation, representatives  of  the  state 
bureau  of  narcotics  and  high  patrol  of- 
ficers also  will  teach. 

Training  School  Visits 
Each  class  will  consist  of  about  25 
men.  They  will  be  held  in  the  police 
academy  at  1215  Nineteenth  Street.  In 
preparation  for  the  opening,  Sked  and 
.Meredith  visited  police  training  schools 
in  San  Francisco.  Los  Angeles,  Oakland 
and  Berkeley. 

Meredith  formerly  was  superinten- 
dent of  the  police  department's  bureau 
of  records  and  Sked  was  in  charge  of 
police  training  and  motor  equipment. 

One  Forward  Step 

The  academy  is  just  one  of  the  for- 
ward steps  Hicks  is  planning  to  keep  the 
Sacramento  department  on  a  par  with 
the  best  law  enforcement  agencies  in  the 
West. 

Hicks  returned  to  the  department  No- 
vember 1st  after  an  18-month  tour  of 
duty  in  the  Air  Force.  He  holds  the  rank 
of  colonel  and  was  Air  Provost  Marshal 
and  acting  Inspector  General  of  the  huge 
Wright-Patterson  Air  Force  Base  in 
Ohio. 

Larger  Force 

In  fact,  during  the  period  he  headed 
a  larger  police  force  than  the  one  he 
returned  to,  a  total  of  400  civilian  and 
100  Air  police;  ran  a  stockade  which 
handled  law  violators  from  all  services  in 
the  Second  Army  Area,  and  was  in 
charge  of  all  security  clearance  and  in- 
\estigation  for  an  average  30,000  ci\il- 
ian  employes  and  10,000  military  per- 
sonnel. 

Hicks  is  a  native  of  Fair  Oaks,  a  Sec- 
ramento  suburb,  and  was  raised  in  the 
Sacramento  area.  In  1936  he  joined  the 
police  department  and  was  assigned  as 
one  of  the  original  team  to  handle  "Snow 
^^  bite."  the  accident  investigation  squad 
car. 

Rapid  Rise 

On  March  3,  1941  he  went  into  the 
service  as  a  lieutenant  in  the  184th  In- 
fantry, California  National  Guard.  His 
rise  in  the  service  was  rapid.  By  the  end 
of  1944  he  was  a  colonel.  He  saw  service 
in  Africa  and  Europe.  He  returned  to 
the  police  department  as  a  patrolman,  in 
1946,  and  the  following  year  he  was 
elevated  to  the  chief's  position. 


Hicks  has  won  many  honors  in  the 
service  and  in  police  work,  but  one  he  is 
particularly  proud  of  is  his  title  of  Ad- 
miral in  the  Nebraska  Navy.  His  old 
friend.  Governor  Dal  Peterson,  con- 
ferred the  honor  on  him. 

AVhen  he  returned  in  November. 
Hicks  replaced  Fritz  Kaminsky  as  chief. 
Kaminsk\'  retired. 


Deputs-  Chief  Roonev 

STOP  AND  REST 

SACRAMENTO  —  The  California 
Highway  Patrol  has  a  special  note  ot 
caution  for  motorists  who  try  to  cram 
two  days  of  driving  into  one. 

Patrol  headquarters  said  squad  com- 
manders throughout  the  state  have  re- 
ported a  growing  number  of  accidents 
involving  sleepy  or  tired  drivers. 

A  preliminary  breakdown  of  1952  sta- 
tistics shows  at  least  2000  fatal  and  in- 
jury accidents  can  be  charged  to  those 
causes.  At  least  100  were  fatal,  killing 
one  or  more  persons. 

Officials  said  some  accidents  in  the 
"cause  unknown"  classification  were 
probably  also  the  results  of  falling  asleep 
at  the  wheel.  Lack  of  survivors  made 
complete  investigation  difficult,  they 
added. 

\Vinter  was  singled  out  as  an  espe- 
cially dangerous  time  for  this  type  of 
accident  since  the  combination  of  closed 
car  windows  and  car  heaters  frequently 
adds  to  any  fatigue  brought  on  by  too 
man\'  hours  behind  the  wheel. 


Ithruary    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  5 


MAD  DOG  SOUTH  OF  THE  SLOT 


Marco  Biaginni  fell  face  down  across 
the  bed. 

A  scarlet  geyser  flowed  freely  from  his 
shattered  face  and  spread  in  an  ever 
widening  circle  across  the  bedclothes. 
Stunned  into  sobriety  the  three  witnesses 
stared  stupidly  at  each  other. 

"I  can't  understand  it.  He  gave  them 
the  money,"  muttered  one. 

"He's  dead." 

"We'd  better  get  out  of  here." 

"Why  did  they  do  it?  He  said  he 
didn't  have  any  more  money." 

"They  killed  him.  Shot  him  in  cold 
blood." 

"There'll  be  cops  in  this.  We'd  better 
get  out  of  here.  " 

"Shouldn't  we  call  an  ambulance?  " 

"It's  no  use.  He's  dead.  We'd  better 
get  out  of  here.'' 

\Vith  one  final,  horrified  glance  at  the 
broken  body  on  the  bed  the  three  men 
left  the  house,  glancing  furtively  around 
them  as  they  did.  A  few  blocks  away 
the  trio  entered  a  narrow  stairway  and 
knocked  at  a  hall  door.  A  man  studied 
them  briefly  through  a  peephole,  then  let 
them  in.  "Whiskey.  "  one  of  them  or- 
dered. 

The  man  placed  a  bottle  and  three 
glasses  on  the  table.  His  guests  poured 
tall  drinks  and  gulped  them  down.  They 
drank  silently,  but  the  liquor  appeared  to 
have  no  effect  on  their  trembling  hands. 
When  the  bottle  was  finished  and  police 
picked  them  upon  the  street  an  hour  later 
the  whiskey  had  done  nothing  other  than 
increase  their  jitters.  The  date  was  Oc- 
tober 9.  1926. 

The  flow  of  blood  from  the  face  of 
Marco  Biaginni  seemed  endless  to  the 
three  men  who  had  been  drinking  in  his 
kitchen  when  t\vo  armed  bandits  entered, 
demanded  money  at  the  point  of  a  gun. 
and  shot  the  Italian  in  the  face  when  he 
could  not  produce  more  than  $75.  T  o 
the  San  Francisco  police  department  it 
was  the  trickle  that  turned  into  a  tor- 
rent. The  gun  that  killed  Marco  Bia- 
ginni fired  the  opening  shot  of  a  three- 
day  org>-  of  murder  that  is  unparalleled 
in  the  history  of  San  Francisco. 

Marco  Biaginni  never  returned  to 
consciousness.  He  died  in  the  San  Fran- 
cisco hospital  a  few  days  after  he  was 
found  by  a  second  part\"  of  revelers.  The 
three  witnesses,  when  rounded  up.  could 
only  tell  police  that  the  killer  was  a 
young  man  with  black  hair.  His  accom- 
plice   had    remained    in    the    hall.     The 


/)'\  Walter  R.  Heco.x 

shooting  occurred  at  about  7:30  p.m.    It 
was  only  the  beginning. 

At  9:00  p.m.,  while  Lieutenant 
Charles  Dullea.  head  of  the  robbery  de- 
tail, sought  to  unravel  the  mystery  of 
the  holdup  murder.  Detective  Sergeant 
George  Healy,  on  duty  at  the  desk  in 
the  detective  bureau,  received  a  repMjrt 
that  a  blue  sedan,  license  number  766- 
954,  had  been  stolen.  The  information 
was  relayed  to  outlying  stations  and  di- 
rected to  the  auto  detail,  where  Lieuten- 
ant Bernard  McDonald  would  receive 
it  the  next  dav. 


^^^ 


Louis  De  Mattei 

Healy  soon  learned,  however,  that 
766-95+  was  a  stolen  car  that  merited 
special  consideration,  and  before  the 
night  was  over  Lieutenant  McDonald 
had  joined  Dullea  in  a  desperate  attempt 
to  capture  a  pair  of  vicious  bandits  who 
used  the  auto  for  violent  crimes,  striking 
at  varied  points  in  the  city  with  madden- 
ing inconsistency. 

The  car  was  first  heard  from  at  1 1 
p.m.  when  Harry  Giannini,  a  cab  driver, 
was  held  up  and  robbed  at  the  corner  of 
Sutter  and  Steiner  Streets.  He  saw  the 
license  number  clearly — 766-95-1 — when 
the  bandits,  both  of  whom  carried  heavy 
caliber  revolvers,  escaped. 


Melville  G.  Mann,  the  next  victim, 
reported  the  duo  had  taken  S12  from  him 
at  Fillmore  Street  near  Hayes.  Mann 
was  still  in  the  act  of  reporting  the  crime 
when  DetectiNe  Charles  McGreevy  re- 
ceived word  that  the  mobile  marauders 
had  struck  again,  this  time  with  near 
tragic  results, 

"There's  been  a  shooting  in  a  pool 
hall,  "  he  told  Healy.  "Someone's  hit. 
Two  young  men  drove  up  in  that  blue 
sedan,  walked  into  a  place  on  Lombard 
Street,  and  shot  it  up." 

"Get  out  there  and  see  what  you  can 
find  out,"  snapped  Healy.  "We've  got 
to  get  them  before  they  tear  the  town 
apart.  " 

McGreevy,  with  Detective  Charles 
Dorman,  hurried  to  the  scene.  There 
they  found  Constantine  Guillen  nursing 
a  shattered  right  arm.  The  two  bandits, 
one  with  black  hair  and  buck  teeth  and 
the  other  with  close-set  eyes  and  a  heavy 
boned  face,  had  held  up  the  place,  then 
fired  five  shots,  hitting  Guillen  twice  in 
the  arm  and  narrowly  missing  his  wife. 
They  had  escaped  in  the  dark  blue  sedan. 
McGreevv  relaved  this  information  to 
Healy.  , 

"Dullea  will  come  and  take  charge," 
Healy  told  him.  "Get  what  you  can 
there  and  go  over  to  AVebster  and  Jack- 
son. Dr.  Nicholas  Jacobs  was  just  robbed 
of  S95  by  the  same  guys." 

McGreevy  and  Dorman  took  brief  re- 
ports, then  hurried  to  the  scene  of  the 
Jacobs  robbery.  While  they  listened  to 
the  doctor's  stor\'  the  two  bandits  pro- 
ceeded to  go  a  long  way  toward  tearing 
the  town  apart. 

At  1 1 :35  they  slugged  Manuel  Salada, 
robbed  him  of  515  and  sent  him  to  the 
hospital  with  a  severely  lacerated  scalp. 
Ten  minutes  later  they  stopped  on 
Bryant  Street,  robbed  George  Karlisky 
and  kidnapped  a  companion.  Mrs.  Emma 
Bird. 

A  few  minutes  later  they  tossed  Mrs. 
Bird  out  of  the  car  with  the  blunt  state- 
ment: "You're  too  old,"  then  sent  An- 
thony Gonzales  to  the  hospital  with  a 
brain  concussion  and  minus  an  overcoat 
and  520. 

They  ranged  across  Market  Street  and 
robbed  John  Copren  of  SIO  and  a  watch. 
One  block  from  the  scene  of  the  Jacobs 
robbery  they  snatched  a  handful  of  cash 
from  the  outstretched  hand  of  cab  driver 
Lester  Irish  who  had  just  dropped  a 
fare  there.  From  Webster  and  Jackson 
(Continued  on  page  37) 


Page  6 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February  1953 


ASSOCIATED  PUBLIC  COMMUNICATIONS  OFFICERS 


I'he  regular  monthly  meeting  of  the 
Associated  Public  Communications  Of- 
ficers, Inc.  was  held  at  The  Chiikicer  in 
San  Mateo,  Calif.,  on  January  15,  1953. 

The  meeting  was  called  to  order  at 
11:15  a.m.  by  Vice  President  Jack  At- 
kinson, in  the  absence  of  President  Hip- 
pely.  Twenty-two  members  and  guests 
were  in  attendance. 

A  letter  from  Solano  County  request- 
ing permission  to  add  a  base  station  at 
Rio  Vista  on  155.40  mc.  was  read,  as  was 
a  letter  from  Merced  County  requesting 
clearance  on  154.89  for  the  cities  of  Dos 
Palos,  Gustine  and  Livingston.  These 
requests  were  approved,  pending  final 
approval  of  McMurphy,  Chairman  of 
the  Frequency  Committee,  who  was  ab- 
sent, by  motion  of  Lewis,  seconded  by 
Mayr. 

A  request  from  the  City  of  Antioch  to 
move  155.37  mc.  to  155.31  mc.  was  ap- 
proved on  motion  by  Keller,  seconded  by 
Maybee. 

Bob  Mason  announced  that  Santa 
Clara  County  was  now  operating  satis- 
factorily on  the  Point  to  Point  network. 
He  spoke  briefly  on  a  meeting  held  to 
determine  methods  of  tying  the  Point  to 
Point  to  other  existing  Intersystem  nets. 
Lewis  added  a  few  pertinent  remarks  on 
the  same  subject. 

A  short  discussion  on  a  possible  meet- 
ing place  for  the  joint  North-South 
meeting  was  held.  Several  places  wer-- 
suggested,  including  Yosemite,  Santa 
Cruz,  Monterey  and  Merced. 

The  meeting  adjourned  at  12:15  p.m. 
for  lunch. 

The  meeting  was  reconvened  at  1  :30 
p.m. 

A  proposed  amendment  to  the  Consti- 
tution and  By-Laws  was  given  a  second 
reading  and  discussed.  Copies  were  dis- 
tributed to  the  members.  After  a  lengthy 
discussion  it  was  moved  to  adopt  by 
Keller,  seconded  by  Maybee,  providing 
the  word  "full"  (as  marked  on  the  at- 
tached copy)  was  deleted.  Carried  by 
vuianimous  vote.  The  Board  of  Direc- 
tors then  voted  to  adopt  the  change  as 
amended. 

Application  for  commercial  member- 
ship from  Raymond  Griese,  of  Bendix 
Radio,  Leland  Smith,  private  contractor, 
and  Ingolph  Dillion,  of  Silentel,  were 
read  and  approved. 

Nomination  of  officers  for  1953  was 
reopened.  The  January  meeting  had  re- 
sulted in  Atkinson  being  nominated  for 


George  Hii'i'LE'i-,  Frisiitcnt 
Art  McDolk,  Secretary-Treasurer 

President,  McDole  for  Vice  President 
and  Tayley  for  Secretary.  There  were 
no  further  nominations  for  these  offices 
and  on  motion  by  Keller,  seconded  by 
Mayr,  the  Secretary  was  instructed  to 
cast  a  white  ballot  for  the  following  offi- 
cers: John  Atkinson,  Santa  Clara 
County,  President;  Art  McDole,  Mon- 
terey County,  Vice  President;  Thomas 
A.  Bayley,  Solano  County,  Secretary. 


Director  Hu'plev 

Mason  and  iVLiybee  were  nominated 
for  Treasurer.  Ballots  being  cast  and 
tallied,  Robert  A.  Mason  of  Santa  Clara 
County  was  named  as  Treasurer. 

The  following  were  nominated  for  the 
Board  of  Directors:  Maybee,  Landers, 
LeBouef,  Keller,  Freeman  and  Burton. 

After  a  spirited  balloting  the  follow- 
ing were  declared  elected:  J.  Mansfield 
Lewis,  Marin  County ;  John  Maybee, 
Sonoma  County;  Merrill  LeBouef, 
Marysville;  Walter  Keller,  Santa  Cruz, 
and  Elmer  Freeman,  U.  S.  Naval  Se- 
curity Officer. 

The  following  commercial  members 
gave  brief  reports:  Robbie  Robertson, 
Brill  Co.;  Ray  Griese,  Bendix  Radio; 
Herb  Watson,  Link;  Jack  Tynes,  P.  T. 
&  T.,  and  Zackarias  of  Zack  Radio. 

John  Mayr  of  Chico  requestejl  infor- 
mation on  available  frequencies  for  the 
Paradise  Fire  District.  After  discussion, 
it  was  suggested  he  apply  to  I  MSA  for 
a  fire  frequency. 

Charles  Simpson,  Chief  of  Police, 
Monterey,  gave  a  brief  discussion  of  the 


ICPA  meeting  at  Los  Angeles,  relative 
to  communications. 

Henry  Bogardus  of  San  Francisco  of- 
fered San  Francisco  for  the  February 
meeting.    Accepted. 

There  being  no  further  business  the 
meeting  was  adjourned  at  3  :00  p.m. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

Art  Dole,  Secretary 


TRAFFIC  TOLL 

California's  1952  traffic  death  toll  has 
been  tentatively  set  at  3618  as  the  Cali- 
fornia Highway  Patrol  begins  its  an- 
nual review  of  street  and  highway  acci- 
dents. 

The  provisional  figure  is  about  4  per 
cent  higher  than  1951's  toll  of  3479  and 
is  just  slightly  under  the  state's  record 
death  toll  of  3668  marked  up  in  1946. 

Traffic  deaths  in  rural  and  unincorpo- 
rated areas  hit  2492,  outnumbering  ur- 
ban fatalities  by  more  than  2  to  1. 

Reports  covering  the  Patrol's  opera- 
tional area  outside  city  limits  show  30,- 
379  fatal  and  injury  accidents  and  48,990 
persons  injured. 

Injuries  in  rural  and  urban  areas  com- 
bined were  estimated  at  well  over  100,- 
000,  but  officials  said  it  was  impossible 
to  set  a  firm  figure  until  all  reports  from 
cities  were  in. 

Preliminary  analysis  of  the  major 
causes  of   1952's  near-record  death  toll 

indicates  that,  as  usual,  speed  was  the 
chief  killer,  with  auto  and  pedestrian 
right-of-way  violations  and  driving  on 
the  wrong  side  of  the  road  close  behind. 


San  Francisco  Federal 
Savings  &  Loan  Assn. 

83  POST  STREET 

San  Francisco 

DO.  2-0072 

Arnold  E.  Archibald 
President 

Insured  Savings    •    Home  Loans 


iibriiary  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  7 


POLICE  PROMOTION  EXAMINATION  QUESTIONS 


III  the  December  issue  of  this  journal 
the  following  numbered  statements,  on 
the  I'enal  Code,  were  true:  4.  5,  8,  10, 
11,23,25,27,36,40,45,46,50. 

^  ^  ^  ^ 

1.  In  this  state  in  all  criminal  cases, 
the  extent  of  imprisonment  must  not  ex- 
ceed one  day  for  every  $2.00  of  the  fine. 

2.  The  maximum  amoimt  of  pre- 
emptory  challenges  that  may  be  taken  if 
the  offense  is  punishable  with  death  is 
twenty  by  either  party,  assuming  there 
are  no  alternate  jurors. 

3.  A  person  who  advises  another  to 
commit  any  crime  is  termed  an  accessory. 

4.  Persons  who  accept  stolen  goods 
knowingly  are  accessories  to  the  crime. 

5.  Any  person  who  exercises  any 
function  of  a  public  officer  without  tak- 
ing the  oath  of  office,  or  giving  the  re- 
quired bond,  is  guilty  of  a  felony. 

6.  The  act  of  wilfully  procuring  an- 
other person  to  commit  perjur\  is  called 
subornation  of  evidence. 

7.  It  is  a  felony  to  of^er  in  evidence 
as  true,  in  any  trial  authorized  by  law, 
any  record,  knowing  the  same  to  have 
been  forged. 

8.  The  penalty  provided  in  the  Penal 
Code  for  a  public  officer  who,  under 
cover  of  authority  without  lawful  neces- 
sit\',  assaults  or  beats  any  person,  is  re- 
moval from  office. 

9.  The  maximum  penalty  for  man- 
slaughter is  ten  years  in  the  state  prison. 

10.  When  no  penalty  is  provided  in 
an>-  statute  for  a  public  ofifense  the  act 
or  omission  is  punishable  as  a  misde- 
meanor. 

11.  If  one  destroys  by  fire  the  dwell- 
ing of  another  he  commits  arson. 

12.  The  obtaining  of  propert)  from 
another  under  color  of  official  right  is 
known  as  embezzlement. 

13.  No  person  can  be  subjected  to  a 
second  prosecution  for  the  same  offense. 

14.  A  search  warrant  may,  in  some 
cases,  be  served  by  an  officer  other  than 
those  mentioned  in  its  directions. 

15.  Perjury  is  punishable  in  the  State 
Prison  not  less  than  one  nor  more  than 
ten  years. 

16.  Every  person  who  attempts  to 
bribe  a  witness  is  guilty  of  a  felony. 

1  7.  Purposely  to  delay  taking  a  per- 
son arrested  upon  a  criminal  charge  be- 
fore a  magistrate  for  hearing  constitutes 
a  felony. 

18.  1  he  unlawful  killing  of  a  human 
being  without  malice  upon  a  sudden 
quarrel  or  heat  of  passion  is  voluntary 
manslaughter. 


19.  Every  person  who  assaults  an- 
other with  intent  to  commit  murder  is 
punishable  in  the  State  Prison  for  not 
less  than  one  nor  more  than  fourteen 
\ears. 

20.  Every  male  person  who  refuses  to 
aid  a  posse  in  apprehension  of  a  criminal 
when  lawfully  required  to  do  so  b\'  an\' 
sheriii  is  guilty  of  crime. 

21.  An  announcement  of  an  appeal 
made  in  open  court  by  either  the  defend- 
ant or  the  people  must  be  immediateh 
entered  in  the  minutes  bv  the  court  room 
clerk. 

22.  Kidnapping  for  blackmail  is  pun- 
ishable by  death  in  California. 

23.  Punishment  for  a  military  offense 
may  be  made  without  regard  to  the  pro- 
visions of  the  Penal  Code. 

24.  Fraudulently  concealing  property 
consisting  of  a  stock  in  trade  valued  at 
$200.00  by  a  debtor  is  a  felony. 

25.  Lack  of  criminal  intent  is  not  suf- 
ficient to  disprove  the  commission  of  a 
crime. 

26.  The  pla\ing  of  faro  or  roulette  is 
forbidden  in  San  Francisco. 

27.  The  maximum  penalty  for  throw- 
ing vitriol  upon  the  person  of  another  is 
fourteen  years  in  the  State  Prison. 

28.  Doors  cannot  be  broken  in  mak- 
ing an  arrest  until  the  purpose  of  admit- 
tance is  explained. 

29.  Every  person  who  wilfulh'  breaks 
up  a  public  meeting,  other  than  religious 
or  political,  and  which  is  not  unlawful 
in  its  character,  is  guilty  of  a  misde- 
meanor. 

30.  Every  person  who  wilfully  dis- 
suades any  witness  from  attending  a  law- 
ful trial  is  guilty  of  a  misdemeanor. 

31.  Every  officer  who  arrests  any  per- 
son without  lawful  authority  therefor  is 
guilty  of  a  felony. 

32.  Homicide  is  justifiable  when 
committed  by  an  officer  in  arresting  per- 
sons charged  with  a  misdemeanor  and 
who  are  resisting  arrest. 

33.  It  is  not  a  crime  to  do  an  act  for 
which  the  law  provides  no  penalt\. 

34.  An  officer  cannot  break  open  a 
door  to  make  an  arrest  for  a  misde- 
meanor. 

35.  Any  peace  officer  who  refuses  to 
arrest  any  person  charged  with  a  crimi- 
nal offense  ma>'  be  purnshed  by  five  years' 
imprisonment. 

36.  In  criminal  conspiracy,  there 
must  be  an  overt  act  as  well  as  an  agree- 
ment to  commit  a  crime. 

37.  Witnesses  must  be  examined  in 
defendant's  presence. 


38.  The  Go\ernor  cannot  grant  a 
pardon  for  treason. 

39.  Upon  defendant's  request  the 
magistrate  must  exclude  the  public  from 
the  examination. 

40.  A  majority  of  the  grand  jury  can 
find  an  indictment. 

41.  The  penalty  for  assault  by  an  of- 
ficer, under  color  of  authority,  without 
lawful  necessity,  may  be  a  fine  not  ex- 
ceeding $5,000;00. 

42.  An  accessory  to  the  commission 
of  a  felony  may  not  be  prosecuted  until 
the  principal   has  been   brought  to  trial. 

43.  A  warrant  of  arrest  must  be  ex- 
ecuted by  a  peace  officer. 

44.  Service  of  a  subpoena  is  made  by 
showing  the  original  or  a  copy  to  the  \\it- 
ness  personally  and  informing  him  of  its 
contents. 

45.  No  criminal  act  may  be  punish- 
able as  a  crime  if  it  is  also  declared  to 
be  punishable  as  a  contempt. 

GASOLINE  TAX  DEDUCTIBLE 

Motorists  have  been  reminded  by  the 
California  State  Automobile  Association 
that  sums  paid  for  state  gasoline  taxes 
may  be  deducted  in  filing  1952  Federal 
income  tax  returns.  This  is  the  second 
\ear  such  deduction  is  allowed  under  a 
new  law. 

The  deduction  covers  the  California 
gasoline  tax  of  4^2  cents  a  gallon  paid 
since  January  1,  1952.  Federal  gasoline 
taxes  are  not  deductible. 

Alotorists  without  accurate  records  of 
the  amount  of  gasoline  purchased  during 
1952  may  justify  a  deduction  based  on  a 
record  of  miles  traveled  divided  by  the 
average  nimiber  of  miles  the  car  runs 
per  gallon. 

However,  the  CSAA  warned  that  the 
burden  of  proving  this  deduction  is 
placed  on  the  taxpayer.  \Vhere  the  gaso- 
line tax  deduction  is  estimated,  taxpaver'- 
should  have  evidence  to  prove  miles  trav- 
eled and  gasoline  consumption  per  mile. 

Motorists  with  oil  company  credit 
cards  can  easily  determine  the  amount  of 
gas  tax  paid  during  1952. 

Other  deductible  items  are:  Retail 
sales  or  use  taxes  paid  on  purchase  of 
automobiles  and  accessories;  registration, 
vehicle  license,  operator  and  chauffeur 
license  fees ;  personal  property  and  mu- 
nicipal taxes;  amounts  paid  for  interest 
on  auto  loans  and  losses  or  damages  to 
vehicles  not  compensated  for  by  insurance 
or  otherwise. 

(Continued  on  page  36) 


Page  8 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

Keep  Your  Driver  Dry 


February  1953 


Sacramento  is  widely  known  as  a  place 
where  it  is  higlily  unprofitable  as  well  as 
unhealthy  to  go  careening  around  the 
streets  behind  the  wheel  of  a  car  after 
imbibing  too  much  giggle  water. 

The  particular  reason  is  James  M. 
McDonnell,  the  municipal  court  judge 
who  hands  out  the  fines — and  sometimes 
jail  sentences — for  traffic  offenses. 

National  Recognition 
McDonnell    works    closely    with    the 
police  department  in  trying  to  make  the 
streets  as  safe  as  possible,  and  the  results 
ha\e  earned  him  national  recognition. 


Judge  McDonnell 

In  December,  1948,  for  example,  his 
court  was  awarded  a  first  place  tie  witli 
Tulsa,  Okla.,  in  a  traffic  court  contest 
among  47  cities  with  populations  rpn''- 
ing  from  100,000  to  200,000.  The  con- 
test was  sponsored  by  the  American  Bar 
Association  and  the  National  Safetv 
Council.  Judgs  McDonnell  was  cited 
specifically  for  improvements  he  made  in 
the  court,  which  also  has  been  sin^i'ed 
out  for  various  other  honors. 

In  addition  to  handling  traffic  cases, 
the  judge  tries  misdemeanors  and  pre- 
liminary hearings,  but  his  pet  is  the  traf- 
fic division  of  the  court. 

$601,900  in  Fines 
And  this  phase  has  really  gotten  to  be 
big  business.  Last  year,  for  e.xample,  the 
court  and  the  traffic  violations  bureati 
collected  $601,900  in  fines,  mostly  for 
traffic  offenses.    This  represented  an  in- 


crease of  65  per  cent  from  the  total  for 
the  previous  year. 

1  he  figures  show  a  steady  increase 
since  1945,  when  the  total  amount  col- 
letced  was  $122,954.  By  comparison, 
last  year  the  drunk  driving  fines  alone 
amounted  to  more  than  $100,000. 

City  Prosecutor 

Judge  McDonnell  served  as  city 
prosecutor  from  December  13,  1939  un- 
til he  was  appointed  police  judge  June 
26,  1940.  He  has  been  elected  to  office 
regularly  since  then  without  opposition. 

He  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of 
California  and  Hastings  College  of  Law. 

Frequently  the  judge  is  called  on  to 
sit  on  the  superior  bench  in  nearby  coun- 
ties in  the  absence  of  the  regular  judges. 
He  is  .a  member  of  the  State  Judicial 
Council's  subcommittee  on  pretrial  court 
procedure. 


Here  are  some  facts  and  figures 
about  the  traffic  problem  in  Sacra- 
mento, compiled  by  the  staff  of  Traf- 
fic Chief  Patrick  J.  Bennett: 

Male  drivers  involved  in  traffic 
accidents  in  the  city  outnumbered 
women  drivers  nearly  five  to  one  in 
1952. 

The  safest  hours  to  drive  are  be- 
tween 4  AM  and  6  AM  ;  the  worst 
are  4  PM  to  6  PM.  Sunday  is  the 
safest  day  to  go  for  a  ride,  Saturday 
the  most  dangerous. 

Last  year  there  were  5,310  traffic 
accidents  in  Sacramento,  an  increase 
of  241  from  the  previous  year.  Ac- 
tually, when  a  big  increase  in  regis- 
tration IS  figured  in,  the  accident 
percentage  is  down. 

Eighteen  persons,  10  of  them  pedes- 
trians, died  as  the  result  of  traffic 
accidents  last  year,  representing  the 
lowest  death  rate  per  10,000  motor 
vehicle  registrations  since  1944. 

There  were  1,153  injury  accidents, 
compared  with  a  1951  total  of  1,095, 
and  4,141  property  damage  mishaps 
against  3,856. 

Drivers  in  the  25  to  34  age  group 
v\ere  involved  in  the  greatest  number 
of  accidents.  The  35  to  44  year  group 
followed. 

All  told,  32,641  persons  were  cited 
or  arrested  for  moving  violations  in 
1952,  including  421  drunk  drivers. 

Nonmoving  citations  totaled  74,- 
459,  mostly  involving  careless  parkers. 


Excerpts  from  San  Francisco 
Police  Ordinances 

(Continued  from  last  issue) 

Sec.  1086:  "Jitney  Bus."  Defined. 
Common  Carrier. 

1.  A  jitney  bus  is  a  common  carrier 
other  thati  a  street  car. 

2.  It  traverses  the  public  streets  be-  I 
tween  certain  definite  points  or  termini. 

3.  It  conveys  passengers  at  a  fixed 
charge  between  the  specified  termini. 

Sec.  1087:    Regulations. 

Under  this  section,  and  all  sections  to 
1110,  the  following  provisions  cover  the 
operation  of  jitney  buses: 

1.  A  permit  must  be  secured  from  the 
Police  Department. 

2.  The  application  to  the  Chief  of 
Police  must  give  full  particulars  cover- 
ing vehicle,  also  concerning  operator's 
qualifications,  as  to  citizenship,  experi- 
ence, etc.,  and  must  be  notarized. 

3.  A  "bond"  or  a  "policy  of  insur- 
ance" must  at  all  times  be  in  full  force 
and  effect. 

4.  Prescribed  metallic  tags  must  be 
carried. 

5.  Number  of  jitney  bus  licenses  is 
limited.  Priority  of  application  is  ob- 
served. No  jitney  bus  shall  have  more 
than  one  operator. 

6.  Drivers  or  operators  shall  file  pho- 
tographs with  the  Police  Department, 
and  carry  copy  attached  to  operator  card. 

7.  The  annual  fees,  payable  to  Tax 
Collector,  for  metallic  tags,  are:  $15.00 
for  a  5-passenger  and  $22.50  for  a  6-7 
bus. 

8.  Prescribed  route  must  not  be  devi- 
ated from. 

9.  If  a  passenger  rides  on  running 
board  both  he  and  the  operator  are  vio- 
lators. 

10.  Police  Department  may  revoke 
permit  for  violations  of  jitney  bus  provi- 
sions or  for  violation  of  either  state  or 
local  traffic  laws. 

11.  Bus  must  be  kept  clean,  and 
washed  once  a  week,  also  must  be  disin- 
fected on  notice  from  Board  of  Health. 

12.  AVhile  carrying  a  passenger  oper- 
ator must  not  smoke. 

13.  Operator  must  have  brakes  in- 
spected daily  by  competent  party. 

14.  AVhen  loading  or  unloading,  bus 
must  be  within  two  feet  of  the  curb. 

1 5.  While  in  use  and  displaying  speci- 
fied tags,  bus  must  run  to  termination 
shown  on  same. 


i'chriuiry   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  9 


SACRAMENTO  TRAFFIC  REPORT 


Chict  I'atrick  J.  Bennett  of  the  Sac- 
ramento Police  Department's  Iraffic  Di- 
vision has  started  a  campaign  to  enlist 
the  support  of  e\ery  possible  person  ami 
organization  in  the  Capital  in  a  giant 
safety  campaign. 

Although  the  division  has  been  award- 
ed outstanding  honors  by  national  or- 
ganizations for  performance  every  year 
since  1^48  in  various  phases  of  traffic 
work,  Hennett  believes  a  great  deal  more 
can  be  accomplished  if  everybody  iti  town 
pitches  in. 

Cooperation  Needed 
He  had  this  to  sav  in  his  annual  report 
to  Police  Chief  James  V.  Hicks  for  1952. 
which  has  been  widely  circulated  in  Sac- 
ramento : 

"This  is  for  the  purpose  of  bringing 
before  the  citizens  of  the  community  the 
need  for  real  cooperation  by  scores  of  or- 
ganizations, working  as  one  safety  team  ; 
also  the  need  for  getting  active  leadership 
and  support  from  public  officials,  not  a 
few,  but  more  and  more  of  them,  and. 
finalh',  to  bring  home  to  each  individual 
the  fact  that  it  is  his  duty  and  responsi- 
bility to  support  this  community's  life 
saving  program." 

Record  Not  Poor 

He  pointed  out  the  city's  record  in 
traffic  injuries  and  deaths  is  by  no  means 
poor,  but  added: 

"This  is  nothing  to  boast  about  as  long 
as  we  are  killing  and  maiming  our  Sacra- 
mento people  at  the  rate  of  approxi- 
mately 18  to  20  deaths  and  1,100  to 
1.200  injuries  a  year.  Besides  this,  the 
people  must  pay  for  the  additional  finan- 
cial loss  due  to  4,100  to  4.200  property 
damage  accidents  a  year. 

Bennett  is  justifiably  proud  of  the  tre- 
mendous job  his  men  have  done  in  mak- 
ing Sacramento's  jam  packed  streets  as 
safe  as  they  are,  but  he  is  planning  to 
carry  the  safety  message  to  every  corner 
of  the  city  in  an  effort  to  improve  the 
record. 

Sacramento  Gets  Share 

The  1952  National  Safety  Council 
awards  have  not  yet  been  announced,  but 
if  the  past  is  any  criterion,  the  Sacra- 
mento traffic  division  will  get  its  share. 
In  1950  and  1951,  for  example,  the  di- 
vision won  the  top  honor  for  record 
keeping  in  the  NSC  national  contest. 
The  award  was  won  in  competition  with 
cities  of  all  size,  not  just  according  to  a 
population  growth.  Group  and  division 
awards  also  have  been  won  bv  the  unit. 


in  Safet)'  Council  and  American  Auto- 
mobile Association  contests  for  traffic 
safet\'  organization,  outstanding  achieve- 
ment and  pedestrian  safety. 


Captain  Bennett 

Pedestrian  safety  is  the  Number  One 
project  with  Bennett  and  his  men.  It  has 
been  since  June,  1948,  when  a  study  of 
the  records  showed  almost  100  per  cent 
of  the  pedestrian  fatalities  were  caused 
bv  two  law  violations:  Jaywalking  and 
violating  the  right  of  way. 

Avoidable  Deaths 

In  other  words,  half  the  deaths  might 
have  been  avoided  if  the  pedestrians  had 
observed  right  of  way  rules  and  the  other 
half  resulted  from  motorists  breaking  the 
law  when   the  walker  was  in   the   right. 

A  stringent  program  of  selective  en- 
forcement was  put  into  efifect.  The  first 
year  the  fatalities  dropped  36  per  cent 
and  it  has  kept  going  down  ever  since. 

Sacramento's  traffic  problem  is  a  king 
size  headache  for  a  number  of  reasons. 
The  most  important,  no  doubt,  is  the  fact 
that  since  1946  there  has  been  a  237  per 
cent  increase  in  the  number  of  motor  ve- 
hicles registered  to  Sacramentans.  While 
the  population  was  growing  by  big  leaps, 
the  motor  vehicle  registration  was  gain- 
ing even  more  rapidly.  For  the  last  sev- 
eral years,  Sacramento  has  had  more 
motor  vehicles  per  capita  than  any  other 
place  in  the  world. 

Moving  Safely 

I  o  meet  this  situation,  Bennett,  as- 
sisted by  Captain  Kenneth  John.son,  Ser- 


geants \\  illiam  Kinney,  'Fom  Richer 
and  Henjanuii  Shiro  and  a  greatly  ex- 
panded department,  are  waging  a  24 
hour  a  da\'  fight  to  keep  traffic  mo\  ing 
in  the  safest  way  possible. 

A  visitor  to  Sacramento  for  the  first 
time  in  a  few  \ears  would  hardly  rccog- 
nice  the  streets  because  of  all  the  changes. 
One  way  streets  ha\e  been  put  into  oper- 
ation throughout  the  city  and  more  are 
planned.  The  scramble  traffic  system  is 
in  use  at  two  of  the  main  downtown  in- 
tersections and  will  be  used  at  many  more 
in  the  near  future.  One  of  the  biggest 
headaches  for  many  years — double  park- 
ing— has  been  eliminated  through  addi- 
tional loading  zones  and  a  crackdown 
a'ra'nst  double  parkers. 

Accident  Facts 

Bennett  has  hit  on  a  neat  gimmick  for 
getting  his  traffic  safety  message  and  his 
plea  for  cooperation  over  to  the  pub!'- 
and  to  public  officials.  His  annual  renorr 
is  issued  in  a  booklet  form  called  Acci- 
dent Facts.  Each  graph  or  chart  is  illu  ■.- 
trated  with  a  cartoon.  I  hey  are  drawn, 
not  by  professional  artists  as  the  work 
indicates,  but  by  I  raffic  Officers  Francis 
Brazil,  Preston  Scott  and  Phillip  ''i'ork. 

Fhe  booklet  analyzes  pedestrian  ileaths 
and  injuries  by  age,  sex,  residence  and 
time  of  day;  all  fatalities  are  listed  b\- 
age  group,  rate  per  10,000  motor  \  ehicle 
registration,  etc.  But  instead  of  a  big  list 
of  dry  statistics  which  the  a\'erage  person 
wouldn't  look  at  twice,  the  facts  are  pre- 
sented in  a  brief,  compact  and  entertain- 
ing way  which  really  packs  a  punch. 

100,000  Cited 

And  all  the  while  this  effort  is  being 
put  into  educating  the  public,  a  really 
tremendous  amount  of  energy  and  time 
is  being  put  into  the  job  of  making  the 
streets  as  safe  as  possible. 

Last  year,  for  example,  Bennett's  men 
for  the  first  time  arrested  and  cited  more 
than  100,000  persons.  The  total  number 
of  arrests  and  citations  was  107,100, 
against  a  previous  high  of  96,574  for 
1951. 


Phone  401 -J 

CAMINO  GARAGE 

BRUCE  BUHLERT.  Prop. 

TIRES  -  GAS  -   OIL  -  LUBRICATION 
BATTERIES  -  GENERAL  REPAIRS 


CAMINO 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  10 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

GOODBY  BLUE  ROOM 


February  1953 


Sheriff  Don  Cox  of  Sacramento 
County  figures  things  are  looking  bright- 
er this  year  than  they  have  at  any  time 
during  the  21  years  he  has  been  in  office. 

He  is  particularly  happy  because  at 
last  something  concrete  is  being  done  to 
better  conditions  in  the  Sacramento 
County  Jail. 

For  more  than  10  years  the  sheriff  has 
been  pressing  the  county  board  of  super- 


Sheriff  Cox 

visors  to  expand  the  jail  facilities.  But 
progress  was  stalled  at  various  times  be- 
cause of  material  shortages,  the  war,  lack 
of  money  and  other  reasons. 

Blue  Room  Gone 

But  last  month  he  finally  got  rid  of 
the  jail's  socalled  Blue  Room  when  an 
annex  to  the  jail  was  opened  near  the 
county  road  camp  at  Franklin,  south  of 
Sacramento.  For  years  Cox  had  been 
complaining  about  the  lack  of  space 
which  forced  him  to  put  as  many  as  120 
men  at  a  time  in  the  Blue  Room,  wh'ch 
was  nothing  but  a  converted  store 
room  which  never  should  have  housed 
prisoners  in  the  first  place. 

The  men  were  transferred  to  clean, 
well  lighted  army  barracks  type  build- 
ings and  the  Blue  Room  was  put  into 
use  for  storage  purposes. 

Expansion  Planned 

And  now,  county  officials  have  prom- 
ised Cox  they  also  are  going  to  enlarge 
the  jail,  which  was  built  in  1909  to  house 
140  men,    but   usually  has   nearly   twice 


that     ULimber    even    without    the    Blue 
Room. 

In  addition  to  the  jail  prisoners,  the 
sheriff  has  under  his  supervision  two  road 
camps  which  average  about  450  prisoners 
throughout  the  year,  and  the  jail  annex, 
which  houses  about  120. 

The  jail  enlargement  still  is  in  a 
strictly  preliminary  stage,  but  Co.x  is  con- 
fident something  definite  will  be  done  by 
the  end  of  the  year. 

Force  Increased 

Another  reason  things  are  looking  up 
around  the  sheriff's  office  is  the  fact  addi- 
tional men  have  been  added  to  the  force 
to  keep  pace  with  the  rapid  growth  of  the 
population  in  the  count}'. 

During  the  last  year  Cox's  force  grew 
by  20  meji.  He  was  given  10  resident  dep- 
uties,   scattered    throughout   the   county, 


Undersheriff  Rippey 

who  operate  from  their  home  areas,  and 
have  proven  of  great  help.  In  addition, 
five  men  were  added  to  man  the  jail  an- 
nex, three  more  squad  car  men  were 
hired  and  two  additional  transportation 
deputies  were  put  on.  His  staff  now  to- 
tals 108. 

None  Too  Large 
Fhis  is  none  too  large,  however,  and 
more  men  probably  will  be  hired  during 
the  year. 

Cox  was  appointed  sheriff  in  1932 
when  his  old  boss,  Ellis  Jones,  retired. 
He  was  luidersheriff  at  the  time.  Born 
in  Spencer  County,  Ind.,  he  came  to 
California    in    1911,   worked    at   various 


jobs,  and  enlisted  in  the  Navy  in   1917. 
After  his  discharge  in  1921  he  joined  the  -I 
sheriff's  office. 

Soon  after  he  joined  the  force  he  took    ! 
up  the  study  of  law  to  help  him  in  his 
work.    He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in 
1926,   and  could   hang  out  his   lawyer's 
shingle  any  time  he  wanted  to. 

RIPPEY  PROMOTED 

William  J.  Rippey  is  the  Undersher- 
iff of  Sacramento  County. 

Sheriff  Don  Cox  appointed  him  to  the 
post  last  July  1st  when  Harry  Knoll 
retired. 

The  promotion  was  deserved,  for  Rip- 
pey had  been  with  the  sheriff's  office  for 
\Sy2  years,  and  was  a  captain  in  charge 
of  the  sheriff's  civil  department  when  he 
was  elevated. 

Born  in  San  Francisco,  he  attended 
Sacramento  schools  and  Healds  Business 
College.  He  joined  the  force  as  a  deputy 
and  advanced  to  the  rank  of  captain  two 
years  before  he  took  over  the  undersher- 
iff's  duties.  He  served  in  both  the  civil 
and  criminal  divisions. 

As  Undersheriff  he  has  supervision 
over  all  departments  and  is  the  chief  ad- 
ministrative and  personnel  officer. 

Edwin  P.  Burns  was  elevated  from 
lieutenant  to  captain  when  the  change 
was  made,  and  placed  in  charge  of  the 
i-'ivil  department.  He  has  been  in  the 
sheriff's  office  since  1945. 

ALL  TIME  HIGH 

California  Highway  Patrolmen  halted 
about  one  out  of  every  six  drivers  last 
year  as  the  Patrol's  enforcement  activi- 
ties reached  an  all  time  high. 

A  total  of  681,121  citations  and  writ- 
ten warnings  were  handed  out,  with  cita- 
tions alone  running  439,324,  a  21  per 
cent  increase  over  1951. 

Preliminary  analysis  of  enforcement 
figures  indicates  that  speeding,  the  state's 
No.  1  traffic  killer,  accounted  for  one 
third  of  all  arrests. 

Officers  charged  up  25,046,071  miles 
during  the  year,  an  average  of  more  than  j 
20,000    miles    for   each   of   the   Patrol's  \ 
1200  traffic  officers. 

IVucks  figured  prominently  in  the  en- 
forcement picture.  Officers  made  751,- 
957  commercial  vehicle  inspections  which 
resulted  in  77,737  arrests  and  the  writ- 
ing of  53,702  warnings. 

The  Patrol  also  disclosed  that  more 
than  9500  arrests  for  drunk  driving  were 
made  in  1952,  a  13  per  cent  hike  over 
1951. 


\ 


Ft  hr nary    1 953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  11 


Streamlined  For  Efficiency 


North  Sacramento,  the  fast  growing 
city  just  north  of  the  Capital,  has  a  repu- 
tation of  being  a  place  where  very  few 
serious  crimes  take  place,  and  a  big  part 
of  the  credit  goes  to  Police  Chief  Wil- 
liam Wilson  anil  his  force. 


other  indoor  chores  done  and  still  have 
his  officers  on  the  street  as  much  of  the 
time  as  possible. 

He  solved  it  b\-  hiring  four  women, 
Audre\'  Caxiani,  Eleanor  Post,  Bee  Cur- 
tiss   and   Scyrillia   Johnson,   who   handlf 


tion.  When  Wilson  joined  the  force  the 
citv's  population  was  onlv  3,000.  Now 
it  is  about  10,000. 

And  traffic  at  the  time  was  a  trickle 
compared  with  the  25,000  to  30,000  cars 
a  day  which  use  Del  Paso  Boulevard,  the 


The  small  but  effective  department 
has  been  streamlined  for  maximum  effi- 
ciency since  Wilson  took  o\er  as  chief  in 
1945.  He  has  been  with  the  department 
for  15  years,  and  was  assistant  chief  for 
five  before  he  took  charge  of  the  depart- 
ment. 

Knotty  Problem 

During  the  last  year  AVilson  solved 
one  of  the  department's  knottiest  prob- 
lems: How  to  get  all  the  office  work  and 


North  S.\crami:xto  Police  Dep.artmf.nt 

the  radio,  do  clerical  duties.  ju\eiiile 
work,  and  other  tasks,  and  when  neces- 
sary double  as  matrons. 

This  allows  Chief  Wilson  and  his  men 
to  spend  nearly  all  of  their  time  in  the 
patrol  cars,  handling  criminal  and  traffic 
work. 

Traffic  Tough 
And    if    the   crime    rate    is   down    in 
North    Sacramento,    the    traffic   problem 
has  gone  in   exactly  the  opposite  direc- 


city's  main  traffic  artery.  During  recent 
years  about  60,000  people  have  moved 
into  the  area  just  north  of  North  Sacra- 
mento, and  most  of  them  make  a  two 
way  trip  through  the  city  going  to  and 
from  work  daily. 

Low  Accident  Rate 

But  despite  the  tremendous  traffic  flow 

the  city  has  a  very  low  traffic  accident 

rate.     1  he  Police  Department  was  hon- 

(Continuid  on  page  50) 


Page  12  POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

McCurry  Elected  CSAA  President 


February   1953 


Harold  j.  McCurry,  secretar\ -man- 
ager of  the  Retail  Merchants  Associa- 
tion of  Sacramento,  is  the  new  president 
of  the  California  State  Automobile  As- 
sociation. He  was  elected  by  the  Asso- 
ciation Board  of  Directors  at  its  annual 
meeting  Thursday,  January  15,  in  San 
Francisco. 


Harold  J.  McCuRRV 

McCurry  was  for  many  years  an  of- 
ficial of  the  California  State  Fair,  super- 
vising press  and  radio  activities.  He  gave 
up  this  civic  work  about  a  year  ago  when 
he  retired  as  a  vice  president  of  the 
Banic  of  America,  continuing  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  bank's  advisory  board  in  the 
state  capital.  He  was  formerly  post- 
master at  Sacramento  and  is  a  past  presi- 
dent of  the  Sacramento  Chamber  of 
Commerce. 

CSAA  membership  at  the  close  of 
1952  totaled  276,096,  an  increase  of 
21,252  during  the  year,  according  to  the 
annual  report  of  Porter  Sesnon,  retiring 
president. 

Other  officers  elected  for  1953  were 
Edward  H.  Peterson,  San  Francisco,  and 
Charles  G.  Bird,  Stockton,  vice  presi- 
dents; Fred  J.  Oehler,  San  Jose,  treas- 
urer; D.  E.  Watkins,  secretary  and  gen- 
eral manager;  Edwin  S.  Moore,  assist- 
ant secretary  and  general  manager. 


Eight    directors    were    elected    at    the 
Association  membership  meeting  to  new 
three-year   terms   on    the   CSAA   board. 
They   are:    Clyde   W.    Rann,    Redding 
Irving  H.  Kahn,  Oakland;   Porter  Ses 
non,  San  Mateo;  J.  J.  Krohn,  Areata 
H.  S.  Basford,  San  Francisco;  John  R 
Graham,    Merced ;    Norman    S.    West 
Modesto,   and  J.   B.    Rice,   San   Rafael 

USE  HORN  ON  CURVES 

Many  drivers  think  it  is  a  mark  of 
good  motoring  sense  to  avoid  use  of  the 
horn,  according  to  the  California  State 
Automobile  Association.  However,  there 
are  circumstances  when  proper  use  of  the 
horn  characterizes  good  drivers.  One 
such  is  on  curves  where  vision  is  limited 
to  200  feet  or  less,  as  is  the  case  on  many 
mountain  roads.  The  association  warns 
that  the  law  requires  use  of  the  horn 
when  approaching  such  curves. 

This  is  one  of  the  only  two  provisions 
concerning  use  of  the  horn  in  the  entire 
vehicle  code.  The  other  regulation  re- 
quires drivers  to  use  their  horns  when 
necessary  to  insure  safe  operation  of  their 
cars  and  prohibits  horn  use  for  any  other 
purpose. 

8.000  WARDENS  NEEDED 

San  Francisco  would  need  about  8000 
Civil  Defense  Wardens  to  supplement 
the  police  force  in  case  of  a  major  disaster 
such  as  experienced  by  Hiroshima. 

In  response  to  inquiry  from  the  Civil 
Defense  Director,  Chief  of  Police  Mi- 
chael Gaffey  said,  "it  is  computed  that 
a  nominal  atomic  burst,  with  similar  ef- 
fect in  scale  to  that  experienced  by  the 
City  of  Hiroshima,  would  call  for  the 
services  of  9200  officers  to  perform  the 
police  function.  In  that  such  an  attack 
might  leave  this  department  with  as  few 
as  100  regular  and  200  auxiliary  surviv- 
ing members,  it  is  believed  that  a  mini- 
mum of  8000  wardens  would  be  needed 
to  supplement  our  force." 

MONTEZUMA  WELL 

Montezuma  Well,  located  in  Arizona, 
is  reported  by  the  National  Automobile 
Club  to  be  a  cup-shaped  lake,  seventy- 
eight  feet  below  the  surrounding  terrain, 
seven  hundred  and  fifty  feet  in  diameter, 
and  fed  by  subterranean  waters  of  which 
there  is  no  recorded  depth. 


LAGOMARSINO   RETIRES 

Fred  S.  Lagomarsino,  the  oldest  man 
in  the  Sacramento  Police  Department  in 
age  and  point  of  service,  retired  this 
month. 

Lagomarsino  covered  the  downtown 
beats  in  the  Capital  for  40  years  and 
seven  months  on  foot,  on  a  bicycle,  on  a 
horse  and  in  cars,  when  he  became  70 
years  of  age  February  15th  and  hung  up 
his  uniform. 

"It  doesn't  seem  like  more  than  40 
years  have  gone  by  since  then,"  he  com- 
mented. "I  remember  well  the  day  they 
handed  me  my  star,  shield,  and  box  key, 
and  put  me  on  a  beat  with  just  one 
order.  That  was  to  keep  my  feet  on  the 
pavement. 

Gun  Fight 

"Things  were  a  lot  different  then. 
The  only  examination  you  were  given 
was  the  100-yard  run.  If  you  didn't  col- 
lapse you  were  in.  Nearly  everything 
you  learned  came  to  you  by  experience." 

In  those  days  the  work  week  was 
eight  hours  a  day  for  seven  days  a  week. 

During  the  years  Lagomarsino  came  in 
for  more  than  his  share  of  violence.  In 
1927  he  was  involved  in  a  gun  fight  with 
two  would-be  robbers,  and  captured  both 
of  them.  Five  years  later  he  was  forced 
to  critically  wound  a  marijuana  crazed 
man  he  attempted  to  question.  In  his 
first  year  on  the  force  he  was  among  a 
group  of  officers  sent  to  quell  a  riot  of 
the  socalled  Army  of  the  Unemployed. 

Twelve  Chiefs  of  Police 

In  1922  he  and  eight  other  officers 
were  in  an  elevator  in  the  Hall  of  Jus- 
tice when  the  cable  snapped  and  the 
elevator  plunged  from  the  second  floor 
to  the  basement.  All  the  officers  and  the 
elevator  operator  were  hurt.  The  next 
day  there  was  only  one  member  of  the 
police  force  who  was  able  to  work. 

Lagomarsino  served  under  12  chiefs 
of  police  and  was  assigned  to  patrol  the 
business  section  of  the  city  during  all  but 
about  two  years  of  his  career. 

Before  becoming  an  officer  he  played 
semi-professional  baseball,  and  was  a  well 
known  umpire  between  1912  and  1921. 
He  called  them  at  games  in  which  Babe 
Ruth,  Ty  Cobb  and  Grover  Cleveland 
Alexander  played. 

He  has  no  definite  plans  on  how  he 
will  spend  his  retirement,  but  doesn't 
plan  to  remain  idle  very  long. 


I'lhriiary   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  13 


OFFICER  OF  THE  MONTH 


It  was  one  of  those  wiml-whipped, 
sun-washed  Sundays  which  San  Fran- 
cisco saw  so  much  of  in  February.  Ser- 
geant Jack  Chaney,  of  the  San  Francisco 
Police  Uepartnient's  mounted  patrol,  uas 


For  a  moment  ail  Chaney  could  see 
was  a  rubber  boat  drifting  beachward, 
riding  the  crest  of  a  giant  comber  toward 
the  hard  packed  sand  of  the  shore.  Then, 
as  the  undertow  sucked  the  fragile  craft 


within  the  most  distant  line  of  oversized 
waves.  I  he  officer  did  not  wait  for 
more.  He  headed  the  horse  seaward  and 
seconds  later  he  and  the  animal  were 
plunging  through  the  first  line  of  break- 


walking  his  horse  along  Ocean  Beach, 
keeping  his  eye  on  the  beat  and  enjoying 
the  combination  of  sunlight  and  fresh 
salt  air.  He  was  not  far  from  Fleish- 
hacker  Pool  when  he  heard  the  terrified 
screams  of  Barbara  Engs  and  the  lower 
pitched  shouting  of  her  boy  friend,  John 
C.  Williamson. 


back  to  the  next  line  of  breakers,  he  saw 
the  cause  of  the  shouting.  Williamson 
was  about  fifty  yards  out,  caught  for  the 
moment  in  the  trough  between  two 
waves  as  he  struggled  to  stay  afloat  in 
the  treacherous  surf.  Far  beyond  him, 
Chaney  could  see  Barbara's  blond  head 
bobbing    uncertainly    in    the    foam   just 


ers.  Chaney  was  not  thinking  about  the 
results  of  his  act.  He  was  an  officer, 
sworn  to  protect  life  and  property,  and 
unless  he  moved  fast  at  least  one  life  was 
liable  to  get  away  from  him.  His  be- 
ha\ior  during  the  next  iew  moments 
(Continuid  on  page  5S) 


Page  14 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fchruary   1953 


PROGRESS  REPORT 


Condensation  of  progress  report  to 
Board  of  Police  Commissioners  from  \W . 
H.  Parker,  Los  Angeles  Chief  of  Police, 
January  7,  1953. 

On  August  9,  1950,  I  assumed  the 
duties  and  responsibilities  of  Chief  of 
Police  of  our  city.  I  promised  that  we 
would  strive  for  the  most  efficient  police 
department  in  the  city's  history.  Today, 
I  should  like  to  give  an  accounting  of 
that  stewardship,  and  to  speak  of  things 
that  lie  ahead. 

It  should  surprise  no  one  that  the  path 
has  been  difficult.  The  police  toil  in  the 
field  of  human  behavior,  a  cosmic  riddle 
which  mortal  man  has  never  solved. 
They  not  only  deal  with  this  riddle ;  they 
are  sometimes  themselves  the  victims  of 
it.  As  himian  beings,  they  are  as  prone 
to  fallibility  as  the  citizenry  from  which 
they  were  selected  by  Civil  Service.  My 
responsibility  has  been  to  organize,  train 
and  supervise  so  that  human  weakness 
would  have  a  minimum  effect  upon  our 
assigned  tasks. 

Although   all   that  may  some  day   be 

.accomplished  has  not  been  done,  there  is 

much  gratifying  progress  to  report.    I  am 

confident  it  will  indicate  the  promise  has 

been  kept. 

Absence  of  Political  Control 

The  most  important  factor  in  police 
progress  is  the  fact  that  the  Department 
has  remained  consistently  free  from  par- 
tisan political  control.  The  Los  Angeles 
police  officer  has  been  free  to  do  his  job 
with  complete  impartiality,  owing  re- 
sponsibility only  to  the  people,  the  courts, 
and  duly  constituted  police  authority. 

Manpower 

Police  manpower  has  been  an  acute 
problem.  Department  strength  has 
dropped  from  4,427  to  4,152  officers. 
This  loss  of  275  policemen  has  taken 
place  while  the  city  increased  by  ap- 
proximately 128,000  residents.  Today, 
police  strength  in  Los  Angeles  measures 
9  policemen  per  square  mile  as  compared 
to  51  for  New  York,  34  for  Chicago, 
and  32  for  Philadelphia. 

Despite  fewer  policemen,  Los  Angeles 
today  receives  better  police  protection 
than  at  any  other  time  in  its  history. 
Some  ways  in  which  this  has  been  ac- 
complished are : 

1.  Over  100  officers  employed  at  cler- 
ical tasks  have  been  released  for  field 
duty  through  replacement  by  civilian 
employees. 

2.  One  man  patrol  cars  have  sup- 
planted traditional  two  man  units  in  cer- 
tain  areas  of   the  city.    The  results  are 


being  evaluated  in  order  to  plan  further 
use  of  one  man  units. 

3.  Paper  work  has  been  reduced 
through  cancellation  of  63  outdated  re- 
port forms  and  redesign  of  155  other 
forms,  decreasing  reporting,  typing  and 
filing  time  by  approximately  35  per  cent. 

4.  A  new  identification  system  has 
drastically  reduced  processing  time  of 
prisoners  into  the  City  Jail. 


Florence  Wilson 
Arcadia   Police   Department 

5.  Improved  methods  of  crime  analy- 
sis have  been  adopted,  giving  field  officers 
speedy  and  exact  knowledge  of  criminal 
activity  in  their  assigned  districts. 

6.  New  studies  of  the  distribution  of 
crime  over  the  city's  area  have  enabled 
supervisors  to  scientifically  deploy  offi- 
cers for  maximum  results. 

Recruitment  and  Training 
Despite     manpower    shortages,     high 
standards  of  recruitment  and  a  13  week 
cadet   training   period   have   been   main- 
tained. 

All  new  officers  have  received  emo- 
tional stability  tests  prior  to  graduation. 
The  professional  services  of  a  psychia- 
trist have  recently  been  made  available 
to  increase  the  accuracy  of  these  exami- 
nations. 

Integrity 
An  administrative  division  has  devot- 
ed its  efforts  exclusively  to  investigat- 
ing complaints  against  policemen.  Total 
violations  involving  dishonesty,  abuse  of 
civil    rights   or   excessive   force   averaged 


only     .004     per     cent     of     Department 
strength  during  1951  and  1952. 

Not  even  the  severest  critics  of  your 
police  department  have  found  any  evi- 
dence of  organized  dishonesty  or  toler- 
ated abuse  of  regulatory  powers. 

Crime 

The  criminal  operates  in  Los  Angeles 
only  at  immediate  and  constant  peril  to 
his  freedom.  Organized  crime  cannot 
purchase  immunity  here. 

Crime  rates  have  remained  consistent- 
ly below  the  national  average  for  cities 
of  comparable  size.  The  rate  of  major 
crime  per  100,000  population  during  the 
fiscal  years  Julv,  1950  to  June,  1952  to- 
talled 1008.4.  This  compared  with 
1402.8  for  the  preceding  five-year  period. 
This  represents  a  22'%  decrease. 

Traffic 

Despite  staggering  population  and  ve- 
hicle increases,  Los  Angeles  has  consis- 
tently rated  as  the  safest  major  city  in 
the  nation. 

Narcotics 

Special  juvenile  narcotics  officers  have 
been  trained  to  supplement  the  29-maii 
Narcotic  Division,  rated  as  the  nation's 
finest.  The  police  department  has  co- 
operated with  the  Board  of  Education 
in  an  accelerated  program  of  preventive 
aducation. 

Police  Facilities 

A  588  acre  Prisoner  Rehabilitation 
Center,  begun  in  1952,  is  designed  to  re- 
duce per  capita  costs  of  confinement  and 
provide  a  solution  to  the  city's  growing 
alcoholic  problem  (6  out  of  every  10 
misdemeanor   arrests   in   Los   Angeles). 

Just  last  month,  ground  was  broken 
for  the  new  Civic  Center  Police  Facili- 
ties Building. 

Community  Affairs 

I  have  believed  it  my  duty  to  draw 
upon  the  experience  of  the  police  depart- 
ment in  order  to  speak  out  openly  upon 
vital  questions  of  public  order  and  safety. 
I  have  opposed  legalized  gambling  and 
other  measures  which  might  promote  the 
infiltration  of  organized  crime  into  our 
community.  I  have  acted  decisively 
against  breaches  of  police  discipline,  but 
have  as  quickly  spoken  out  against  mak- 
ing the  policeman  a  "whipping  boy"  for 
the  ills  of  society.  I  have  outlined  the 
dangers  of  too  heavy  reliance  on  an  al- 
ready outmoded  freeway  system. 

1953  City  Election 

The  result  of  aggressive  stands  on  ques- 
tions of  public  safety  is  a  belief  by  some 

(Cimtiiiuid  on  paye  49) 


Ichruary   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  15 


Detective  Division 


The  Detective  Division  of  the  Sacra- 
mento Police  Department  played  a  ma- 
jor role  last  year  in  investigating  4,426 
major  crimes,  solving  a  good  percentage 
of  them  and  recovering  $8 7, 8 7b  worth 
of  stolen  property. 

The  chief  of  the  detective  division  is 
George  Lofquist,  who  took  over  the  divi- 
sion three  years  ago  when  Joseph  E. 
Rooney  was  elevated  to  the  job  of  assist- 
ant chief. 

Second  in  cnmniand  in  the  detecti\  e 
bureau  is  Captain  Larry  Trimble.    John 


(lEORHE  Lofquist 

Gabrielli  and  John  P.  Keneally  are  the 
sergeants.  Members  of  the  major  crime 
detail  are  Detectives  A.  J.  Soulies.  James 
L.  Lyons.  Otto  Dahl  and  Donald  Fox. 

Modest 

Lofquist  is  a  modest  fellow  who  would 
rather  talk  about  his  men  than  himself. 
Although  he  is  proud  of  all  of  his  men, 
during  recent  months  two  in  particular 
have  been  singled  out  for  particular  hon- 
ors— Jack  Greenlaw,  head  of  the  pawn- 
shop detail,  and  Carl  Blasofsel,  who  has 
a  roving  assignment. 

A  good  percentage  of  the  stolen  prop- 
erty recovered  during  any  given  year  is 
picked  up  due  to  the  sharp  eyes  and  re- 
tentive memory  of  Greenlaw.  He  has  a 
record  of  being  consistently  one  of  the 
best  crime  solvers  in  the  department,  par- 
ticularly when  it  comes  to  burglaries. 
He  can  spot  a  stolen  article  in  a  pawn 
shop  half  a  block  away,  the  pawnbrokers 
will  tell  you. 

Every  year  he  adds  to  his  own  and  the 


department's  reputation  by  cleaning  up 
crimes  through  trailing  down  leads  he 
finds  in  the  pawn  shops. 

Own  Boss 

Blasofsel  is  pretty  much  his  own  boss 
in  the  matter  of  picking  assignments. 
Lofquist  has  a  good  reason  for  wanting 
it  to  work  just  that  «ay,  because  Carl  is 
a  fellow  who  has  a  particular  knack  for 
digging  up  leads  on  the  tough  ones  which 
look  as  though  they  never  will  be  solved. 
Recently,  for  example,  the  knifing  mur- 
der of  Marcus  Ballin  in  Sacramento's 
tough  West  End  was  solved,  particularly 
because  Blasofsel  kept  on  digging  for 
months  on  end  when  the  case  looked 
hopeless.  Penally  he  learned  the  suspect's 
first  name,  then  his  middle  name,  and 
eventually  he  identified  him.  A  few 
weeks  ago  a  uniformed  policeman  picked 
him  up  for  not  having  an  operator's  li- 
cense. He  was  identified  through  his 
fingerprints  and,  when  faced  with  the 
evidence  Blasofsel  had  dug  out,  he  con- 
fessed to  Lofquist. 

During  the  last  year,  the  detective  di- 
vision is  proud  of  having  cracked  one  of 
the  worst  burglary  rings  seen  around 
Sacramento  in  a  long  time;  solving  with 


Captain  Tri.mbi.e 

a  single  arrest  a  series  of  more  than  ,^0 
apartment  house  burglaries,  and  quickh 
solving  a  hardware  store  breakin  and 
recovering  a  small  arsenal  stolen  from 
the  store.  Thirty-eight  guns  of  various 
kinds  were  taken,  and  37  were  recov- 
ered. 

Supermarket  Holdups 

Right  now  the  big  problem  is  a  series 
of  nightime  supermarket  stickups.    Last 


year  a  quick  stop  was  put  to  a  similar 
series  when  three  exconvicts  were  caught 
who  admitted  pulling  eight  store  hold- 
ups. Now  the  stickups  have  started  again 
and  the  division  is  working  out  some 
special  plans  which.  Lofquist  hopes,  will 
put  an  end  to  the  new  series. 

Lofquist  has  been  on  the  force  for  22 
years,  and  has  handled  all  kinds  of  im- 
portant assignments.  After  a  short  pe- 
riod as  a  beat  patrolman,  he  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  detecti\e  bureau.  He  head- 
ed the  shoplifting  and  check  details,  rlien 
moved  on  to  the  major  crime  squad.  In 
July,  1937  he  was  given  his  captain's 
bars  and  he  headed  a  uniformed  platoo'i 
until  he  assumed  his  present  post  in  1950 
when  Joseph  E.  Rooney  was  elevn*"d 
from  the  position  of  detective  chief  to 
Assistant  Chief  of  Police. 


WATCH  WHEELS  WOBBLE 

The  fact  that  all  wheels  today  are 
reoKnable  at  the  hub  has  not  eliminated 
the  danger  of  a  wobbling  wh?el  du^  to 
looseness  in  a  lug  nut,  warns  the  Na- 
tional Automobile  Club.  Be  sure  that  the 
nuts  are  taken  up  to  the  last  de'?;ree  after 
a  tire  change,  a  thing  that  is  more  easily 
accomplished  if  the  wrench  is  used  for  a 
final  twist  after  the  jack  has  been  re- 
moved. 


APACHE  TRAIL 

Apache  Trail,  beginning  at  Apache 
Junction,  thirty-four  miles  east  of  Phoe- 
nix in  Arizona,  and  winding  through 
gorgeous  mountain  scenery  to  Globe,  is 
reported  bii'  the  National  Automobile 
Club  to  have  been  at  one  time  the  dark 
and  bloody  stalking  ground  of  the 
Apache. 


DON'T  CROWD 

Don't  crowd  the  rear  end  of  a  truck 
that  you  are  are  trying  to  pass,  advises 
the  National  Automobile  Club.  Stay  far 
enough  behind  it  to  allow  >ourself 
plenty  of  room  to  pull  back  into  line  if 
the  way  ahead  should  be  blocked  by  an 
approaching  vehicle.  And  stay  far  enough 
behind    to   give   yourself   good   visibilit)'. 


DON'T  RACE  WITH  LIGHTS 

Don't  race  with  the  traffic  lights,  ad- 
vises the  National  Automobile  Club.  It 
is  better  to  lose  a  few  seconds  for  that 
next  green  light  than  to  refuse  to  wait 
and  then  lose  vour  life. 


Page  16 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1953 


STREI  HEADS  STATE  POLICE 


Vincent  J.  Strei  is  the  new  chief  of  the 
California  State  Police. 

Justin  G.  Guild,  chief  of  the  state  di- 
vision of  buildings  and  grounds,  recently 
appointed  Strei,  a  veteran  officer,  to  suc- 
ceed Anson  H.  Crutcher.  Crutcher  re- 
signed in  mid  December  to  become  field 
representative  for  Paul  R.  Leake,  the 
new  member  of  the  State  Board  of 
Equalization. 


Golden  Gate  International  Exposition 
Force  on  Treasure  Island.  In  1941  he 
was  transferred  to  Sacramento. 

He  is  married  and  has  two  daughters. 
Mrs.  Alice  Kinsey  of  Sacramento  and 
Patricia  Josephine  Strei,  a  student  at 
Sacramento  State  College. 

In  his  new  job  Crutcher,  who  had 
been  State  Police  chief  since  1946,  will 
coordinate  the  Board  of  Equalization's 
activities  in  the  third  district 

He  is  a  native  of  Williams  in  Colusa 
County  and  served  as  chief  of  police 
there  from  1937  to  1942.  He  is  a  grad- 
uate of  the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investiga- 
tion academy  in  Washington,  D.  C,  and 
a  past  president  of  the  Northern  Cali- 
fornia Peace  Officers  Association. 


Chief  Strei 

San  Francisco  Native 

Strei  has  been  on  the  State  Police  force 
for  15  years,  and  held  the  rank  of  ser-  ";' 
geant  when  he  was  promoted.  He  ha. 
charge  of  a  force  of  100  officers  who  hr.vT 
jurisdiction  over  state  properties  in  S^'-  j^ 
ramento,  San  Francisco  and  Los  Anglic,;. 
Seventy-two  of  the  officers  are  stationed 
in  the  Capital. 

A  native  of  San  Francisco,  Strei  at- 
tended schools  in  Oakland  and  is  a  1924 
graduate  of  St.  Mary's  College.    He  u-ri" 

a  guard  on  the  St.  Mary's  football  ' 

during   the   era   in   which    E.    P.    (Slip)       ir-'y. 

Madigan   turned   out   nationally   famous  Anson  Crutcher 

elevens. 

Shooting  is  his  hobby  and  he  has  taken  During  World  War  II  Crutcher  was 

part  in  national  rifle  and  pistol  competi-  a  commander  in  the  dangerous  cargo  sec- 
tions. He  is  a  onetime  army  infantry  tion  of  the  coast  guard  under  the  captain 
captain.  of    the    Port    of    San    Francisco.     Last 

After  operating  a  hardware  store  in  year  he  was  called  back  to  duty  to  help 
Oakland  for  several  years  the  new  chief  set  up  a  training  program  for  coast  guard 
took  a  job  with  the  state  police  on  the      security  officers  in  the  Korean  ^Var. 


Current!)'  he  is  president  of  Lambda 
Alpha  Epsilon,  the  national  law  enforce- 
ment fraternity. 

Captain  Michael  J.  Strazzo  of  the 
Sacramento  Police  Department,  who  was 
critically  ill  a  year  ago,  is  well  along  the 
road  to  recovery. 


Captain  Strazzo 

Last  Winter  a  good  many  friends  of 
Strazzo,  who  twice  was  president  of  the 
International  Footprint  Association,  and 
is  one  of  Northern  California's  most 
widely  known  policemen,  thought  he 
never  would  wear  his  uniform  again. 

Just  before  Christmas  in  1951  he  had 
a  heart  attack  while  playing  golf.  He 
was  in  the  hospital  for  a  month  and  a 
half  and  even  after  he  was  allowed  to  go 
home  there  was  a  serious  question  for 
quite  a  while  whether  he  would  be  able 
to  take  up  his  duties  again. 

But  last  May,  after  being  on  his  back 
for  more  than  four  months,  he  was  able 
to  return  to  work  part  time.  Since  then 
he  has  gradually  gotten  his  strength  back, 
and  for  months  now  he  has  been  back  on 
the  job  full  time. 

The  news  of  his  courageous  and  suc- 
cessful fight  against  an  ailment  which 
would  have  mowed  down  a  man  with 
less  strength  and  fortitude  is  great  stuff 
to  Mike's  numerous  friends.  He  has 
been  on  the  force  for  22  years. 


I'chriiari'   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  17 


SACRAMENTO  RETIREMENTS 


Fritz  Kaminsky  and  Harry  Knoll,  two 
of  the  most  widely  known  and  respected 
officers  in  the  Sacramento  area,  have  gone 
on  the  retirement  list. 

Kaminsky,  who  held  every  major  job 
in  the  Sacramento  Police  Department 
during  a  30-year  career,  was  chief  when 
he  retired  last  November  1st.  Knoll  was 
undersheriff  of  Sacramento  County  when 
he  took  his  pension  because  of  ill  health 
last  July  1st. 

Gold  Badge 

A\'hen  he  left  the  department  Kamin- 
sky was  presented  with  a  gold  badge  by 
the  members  of  the  force,  with  a  City 
Council  resolution  praising  him  lavishly 
for  his  service  to  the  city,  and  with  a 
fishing  creel  by  his  friends  in  the  traffic 
violations  bureau. 

The  other  day  he  walked  into  the  vio- 
lations bureau  and  showed  what  he  has 
been  doing  with  his  time — he  had  the 
creel  filled  with  striped  bass  as  a  token 
of  thanks  to  the  members  of  the  di\  ision. 

Shorthand  Reporter 
The  ex-chief  was  a  shorthand  reporter 
and  secretary  for  the  Southern  Pacific 
Compan\-  before  he  joined  the  police  de- 
partment in  1922  as  secretary  to  the 
chief.  Not  long  afterward  he  took  the 
police  test  and  became  an  officer. 

During  the  following  years  he  became 
successively  property  clerk,  traffic  chief, 
head  of  the  juvenile  division,  a  platoon 
captain,  chief  of  detectives  and  assistant 
chief. 

In  March,  1951  he  became  chief  when 
Chief  James  V.  Hicks  was  recalled  to 
the  air  force,  in  which  he  holds  a  colo- 
nel's rank.  He  retired  when  Hicks  re- 
turned. 

Famous  Crimes 

During  his  long  career,  Kaminsky 
worked  on  most  of  the  famous  crimes  in 
Sacramento,  but  probably  his  outstanding 
work  was  done  in  connection  with  the 
Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation.  One 
of  the  earliest  graduates  of  the  FHl 
Academy  in  Washington,  D.  C,  he 
worked  closely  with  the  federal  authori- 
ties for  years,  during  ^Vorld  War  II  was 
one  of  the  key  men  in  California  in  the 
federal  government's  anti  subversive 
work. 

Knoll  also  is  known  particularly  for 
his  work  with  the  FBI.  He  handled  all 
of  the  anti  subversive  work  for  the  sher- 
iff's office  during  the  war,  and  because 
of  his  wide  knowledge  of  the  county  he 
was  the  ke\'  man  in  handling  the  evacua- 
tion of  the  Japanese  just  after  the  war 
started. 


County  Detective 

Knoll  has  lived  in  Sacramento  since 
1906  and  before  going  into  law  enforce- 
ment work  was  in  the  cleaning  and  dye- 
ing business.  In  1929  he  got  his  first 
taste  of  police  work  as  county  detecti\e 
under  former  District  Attorney  Neil  R. 
McAllister.  Six  years  later  he  left  to 
join  the  sheriff's  department. 


Chief  Kaminsky 

ACT.  DON'T  TALK 

The  California  Highway  Patrol  has 
asked  the  public's  help  in  a  December 
drive  to  "actually  reduce  traffic  deaths, 
not  just  talk  about  it." 

Patrol  ConiHiisioner  Clifford  E.  Peter- 
son said  he  hoped  any  public  indifference 
to  the  traffic  toll  would  be  lessened  dur- 
ing the  holiday  season. 

"People  seem  to  be  more  responsive  to 
humanitarian  and  sentimental  appeals 
this  time  of  year,"  he  said,  "and  that's 
what  we're  banking  on." 

Peterson  declared  the  Patrol  would 
do  its  part  in  the  life  saving  program  by 
staging  traffic  checks,  handing  out  safety 
literature  and  stepping  up  enforcement 
activity. 

Last  December  322  persons  died  in 
traffic  acicdents  throughout  the  state. 

"Just  a  single  life  saved  this  year  will 
be  worth  any  extra  effort,"  Peterson  said, 
adding  that  the  toll  could  be  materially 
reduced  if  every  motorist  and  pedestrian 
would  accept  personal  responsibility  for 
his  or  her  own  safety. 


In  1943  he  was  named  imdersherift  to 
replace  j.  R.  Ferguson,  who  resigned  to 
become  county  probation  officer.  He  was 
confined  to  his  home  for  four  months 
with  illness  before  he  decided  to  retire. 
Since  then,  however,  his  health  has  im- 
proved considerably  and  he  is  telling  his 
friends  he  may  take  a  job  of  some  kind 
just  to  keep  busy. 

Always  on  Job 

Knoll's  retirement  brought  a  comment 
from  Sheriff  Don  Cox  of  which  any  offi- 
cer coidd  be  more  than  proud.  He  said 
Knoll  "gave  everything  he  had  to  the 
job  he  held"  and  added  : 

"It  was  not  uncommon  for  him  to 
work  12  to  14  hours  a  day,  seven  days 
a  week.  He  always  was  at  his  desk  more 
than  eight  hours  a  day.  In  all  the  time 
Knoll  served  as  undersheriff  he  took  only 
13  days  vacation,  although  he  was  enti- 
tled to  15  work  days  a  year. 

"His  de\otion  to  duty  probably  led  to 
the  illness  which  has  brought  about  his 
retirement.  Had  he  not  felt  it  necessary 
to  return  to  work  when  he  was  suffering 
from  a  virus  infection  he  might  not  have 
contacted  the  more  serious  illness  from 
which  he  has  not  recovered. 

"Knoll's  honesty  is  beyond  question 
and  he  commands  the  utmost  respect  of 
all  who  know  him." 

As  a  positive  step  for  drivers  to  take, 
Peterson  suggested  that  they  tighten  up 
on  their  driving  habits  and  obey  all  traffic 
laws. 

"Year  after  year,"  he  said,  "our  rec- 
ords show  that  in  more  than  nine  out  of 
ten  cases,  Californians  are  being  killed 
and  injured  in  traffic  because  someone 
violates  a  law." 

ANTICIPATION   AND 
SAFE   DRIVING 

\\'hen  driving,  anticipate  the  actions 
of  the  other  fellow  and  you  won't  so  fre- 
quently find  yourself  in  these  tight  spots 
that  call  for  catlike  reactions  to  avoid 
disaster,  advises  the  National  Automobile 
Club.  Anticipation  is  half  the  fun  of  a 
feast.  It  is  also  half  the  battle  of  safe 
driving. 

INDIAN   BASKETRY 

The  Apache  Indians  of  New  Mexico, 
according  to  the  National  Automobile 
Club,  use  Cottonwood,  sumac,  willow, 
mulberry,  squawberry,  and  the  broad 
flexible  strips  of  the  yucca  plant,  in  the 
making  of  fine  basketry. 


Page  18 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February  1953 


Personal  Identification  In  Early  America 


In  the  course  of  the  investigation,  the 
suspect's  fingerprints  were  taken  by  Faii- 
rot,  who  promptly  forwarded  the  impres- 
sions to  Scotland  Yard  to  be  searched  in 
the  files,  since  the  subject  was  obviously 
of  British  extraction.  In  the  London 
bureau,  an  identification  was  made  im- 
mediately, showing  the  questioned  indi- 
\idual  to  be  one  Henry  Johnson,  the 
possessor  of  a  lengthy  criminal  record, 
and  even  then  wanted  for  larceny  in 
England,  where  he  was  known  to  have 
stolen  a  large  sum  before  fleeing  to 
America,  ^\'hen  confronted  with  proof 
of  his  true  identity,  Johnson  confessed 
his  current  act,  and  was  sentenced  to 
serve  a  term  of  six  years. 

Outstanding  Case 

Nor  was  this  the  only  outstanding  case 
to  be  solved  by  Faurot  through  finger- 
prints, shortly  following  his  introduction 
of  the  method.  During  the  year  1*511,  a 
local  burglary  was  committed  in  which 
valuable  loot  was  taken.  Here,  too,  a 
logical  suspect  was  distrusted  in  the  per- 
son of  one  Henry  Crispi,  but  this  decep- 
tive trickster  furnished  an  alibi  that 
seemed  unassailable;  reputable  citizens 
testified  that  Crispi  had  accompanied  him 
to  a  performance  at  the  New  York 
Hippodrome,  and  from  thence  had  gone 
directly  home,  where  his  wife  attested  to 
his  having  been  in  bed  and  asleep  when 
the  burglary  was  actually  committed. 

But  here  again  was  Faurot  destined  to 
triumph.  At  the  scene  of  the  crime,  he 
succeeded  in  developing  certain  evidential 
traces  left  by  the  instigator's  guilty  fin- 
gers. These  he  compared  with  the  prints 
of  Crispi,  and  found  them  to  be  identical. 
^Vhen  faced  with  this  mute  but  con- 
founding testimony,  Crispi  confessed,  ex- 
plaining how  he  had  crept  from  the  hou"-" 
after  his  family  was  asleep,  committed 
the  burglary,  and  returned  unobserved. 

First  Case 

This  criminal  episode  has  often  been 
presumptuously  cited  as  "the  first  finger- 
print case  in  the  United  States."  As  a 
matter  of  fact,  a  much  graver  ofifense 
was  the  subject  of  the  first  legally- 
recorded  judicial  ruling  on  fingerprint 
evidence.  However,  it  is  likely  that,  co- 
incidental with  the  introduction  of  fin- 
gerprinting in  America,  many  cases 
which  did  not  progress  to  the  stage  of  a 
trial  were  solved  by  the  new  method. 
This  would  seem  inevitable  in  view  of 
the  numerous  offenses  and  the  everpres- 
ent  possibility  of  a  solution  by  finger- 
prints. Furthermore,  it  is  a  well-recog- 
nized   fact    that    fingerprints    reach    the 


By  B.  C.  Bridges 

This  is  the  sirontl  of  a  series  of  tirtie/es 
prepared  for  the  POLICE  AND  PEACE  OF- 
FICERS Journal  by  Mr.  Bridges.  He 
is  one  of  the  icorld's  foremost  authorities 
on  fingerprints  and  police  science.  He  is 
now  teaching  at  the  College  of 
San  Francisco. 


B.  C.  Bridges 

courtroom  on  relatively  few  occasions,  as 
compared  with  their  innumerable  in- 
volvements in  criminal  procedure.  1  he 
chief  reason  for  this  is  that  instead  of  re- 
quiring other  factual  data  for  substantia- 
tion, it  is  the  fingerprint  that  renders  all 
form  of  evidence  conclusive. 

This  circumstance  is  al.so  readily  rec- 
o':;nized  by  the  offender,  who,  when 
faced  with  such  overwhelming  proof  of 
his  guilt,  usually  voices  full  admission  of 
responsibility,  and  pleads  for  lenience, 
rather  than  face  the  prospect  of  a  more 
drastic  disposition  through  trial  by  court 
or  jury.  Such  developments,  though 
probably  not  uncommon  even  in  the  early 
■  annals  of  American  fingerprint  identifi- 
cation, would  hardly  have  gained  wide- 
snread  recognition  in  every  instance. 
1  bus,  it  would  be  difficult  to  state  au- 
thoritatively just  which  was  the  "first 
fingerprint  case." 

Chicago  Homicide 

However,  the  first  decision  from  the 
American  bench,  as  cited  above,  was  that 
of  a  homicide  in  Chicago,  also  during  the 
year  1911,  in  which  a  negro,  one  Thomas 
Jennings,   was  convicted,  largely  on  fin- 


gerprint testimony,  of  killing  a  white 
man  with  an  axe  during  the  perpetration 
of  a  burglary.  His  conviction  and  the 
admissibility  of  fingerprint  evidence,  was 
upheld  in  the  Supreme  Court  of  Illinois; 
this  judicial  ruling  is  generally  accepted 
as  the  first  of  its  kind  to  be  handed  down 
in  the  United  States. 

Further  proof  of  increasing  conversion 
to  the  better  system  came  when  Major 
R.  W.  McCloughry  also  visited  England 
to  learn  more  about  the  Galton-Henry 
method.  He,  too,  upon  his  return,  spon- 
sored the  use  of  fingerprinting  in  the  in- 
stitution of  which  he  was  then  superin- 
tendent, the  Federal  Prison  at  Fort 
Leavenworth.  Fhis  event  was  one  of 
Luiusual  circumstance,  since  it  will  be 
remembered  that  Major  McCloughry  is 
accredited  with  having  introduced  the 
Bertillon  system  in  the  United  States  in 
1887,  while  he  was  warden  of  the  Illi- 
nois State  Penitentiary.  Major  Mc- 
Cloughry's  early  awakening  to  finger- 
print importance  is  more  precisely  indi- 
cated by  a  letter  to  the  Attorney  Gen- 
eral, dated  September  4,  1904,  making 
formal  request  for  authority  to  finger- 
print prisoners  under  his  charge.  Official 
permission  was  granted  in  an  answering 
communication  bearing  the  date  Novem- 
ber 2,  1904. 

Fingerprints  March  Forward 

In  both  the  civil  and  criminal  identi- 
fication fields,  fingerprints  were  march- 
ing forward  with  mighty  strides.  In 
1905,  the  Commissioner  of  Indian  Af- 
fairs of  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
adopted  the  practice  of  requiring  a 
thumbprint  to  be  furnished  by  each  In- 
dian signator,  in  the  preparation  of  writ- 
ten agreements.  The  custom  became  a 
mandatory  stipulation  with  an  authorita- 
tive circular,  issued  by  the  Interior  De- 
partment in  1908,  requiring  that  such 
thumbprints  be  added  to  all  official  pa- 
pers signed  by  Indians. 

The  adoption  of  fingerprinting  in 
1905  by  the  United  States  Army  not 
only  marked  an  epic  history  in  the 
science,  but  also  immediately  supplied  a 
long  felt  need  in  that  important  branch 
of  government  einploy.  After  extensive 
investigation,  a  board  of  inquiry,  ap- 
pointed by  the  Adjutant-General,  and 
composed  of  high  ranking  officers,  re- 
ported favorably  on  the  method,  stress- 
ing its  effectiveness  and  infallibility,  and 
pointing  out  that  fingerprinting  would 
remove  many  of  the  army's  past  and  cur- 
rent identification  difficulties.  In  ever\ 
(Couliiiucii  on  page  30) 


l\l>, 


1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  19 


THE    WHIP 

FINE  FOOD  AND  COCKTAILS 

418  EYE  STREET — In  the  Dania  Hall 

Phone  2-9457    •    Orders  to  Take  Out 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

TIOGA    CAFE 

AMERICAN  AND  CHINESE  DISHES 
QUALITY  BEERS   •   SOFT  DRINKS 

Phone  3404 
1012  "H"  STREET 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


ASBILL'S  APPLIANCES 

T.V.    •    RADIOS    •    REFRIGERATORS 

AND  FREEZERS 

WASHERS   •    IRONERS    •    APPLIANCES 

Phone  3-1813 
I4TH  AND  D  STREETS 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-72S7 

PUTNAM  SAND  AND  GRAVEL  CO. 

CONCRETE  MIX 

Plaster  Sand    •    Roofing  Gravel    •    Screenings 

Cement    •   Concrete    '    Sand    •    Dirt 

P.  O.  Box  486 
200  SANTA  ROSA 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Clint   Thompson — Harold    Wayland--Bud  Cremp 

Modesto  Livestock  Commission  Co. 

AUCTION  EVERY  MONDAY 

Cattle    •    Horses    •    Hogs    •    Sheep 

One  Mile  South  of  Modesto  on  Old  Highway  99 

BOX  3235.  ROUTE  4 

Phone   1860 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


WHITE'S  TRANSPORTATION 

LOCAL  AND  LONG  DISTANCE  TRUCKING 

Route  2.  Box  36 

MANTECA  CALIFORNIA 

E.   D.   BLAKELY  AND   SON 

Distributors   for 
HANCOCK  OIL  PRODUCTS  AND 
QUAKER  STATE  LUBRICANTS 

Phone  2-1016 

WATERFORD  ROAD — P.  O.  Box  1306 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2-6996W 

THEIS     AND     WHITE 

FAIRBANKS  MORSE    •   POMONA  PUMPS 

ON  LOS  BANCS  HIGHWAY 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


OCTOBER  TRAFFIC  TOLL 

W'itli  .^72  deaths  recorded  ami  reports 
still  coming  in,  October  now  stands  as 
I''52's  worst  month  for  traffic  fatalities, 
the  California  Highwa\'  Patrol  said 
totla\. 

October's  toll  was  4b  more  than  the 
previous  high  set  in  September  when  326 
persons  met  death  on  the  streets  and  high- 
ways. 

A  breakdown  of  the  October  figures 
shows  that  76  of  the  victims  were  pedes- 
trians and  that  rural  deaths  outnumbered 
urban  deaths  by  more  than  2  to  1.  Of 
the  372  persons  killed,  257  died  in  acci- 
dents occurring  in  unincorporated  areas 
and  the  remaining  115  lost  their  lives 
within  city  limits. 

October's  toll  pushed  this  year's  traffic 
deaths  to  2,885,  about  3  per  cent  more 
than  last  year  at  this  time.  In  actual  fig- 
ures, 89  more  persons  have  died  this  year 
and  2b  of  them — almost  one-third — met 
death  in  October. 

City  figures  on  traffic  injuries  are  in- 
complete, but  a  check  of  rural  reports 
shows  that  more  than  4000  injuries  last 
month  hiked  1952's  record  to  39,892, 
almost  a  10  per  cent  increase  over  the 
first  ten  months  of  1951. 

For  the  past  10  years,  October,  No- 
vember and  December  have  been  the 
\ear's  worst  months,  with  traffic  deaths 
in  December  dipping  below  300  on  onh' 
one  occasion. 

TRAFFIC  CHECKS 

Patrol  Commissioner  Clifford  T.  Pe- 
terson credited  traffic  checks  over  the 
1951  Christmas  holiday  with  substan- 
tially reducing  the  rural  highway  death 
rate  from  the  year  before. 

"Even  so,"  he  said,  "8  persons  were 
killed  and  231  were  injured  in  a  30 
hour  period.    That's  too  many." 

Violations  frequently  turning  up  in 
traffic  checks  are  drunk  dri\  ing,  operat- 
ing an  unsafe  vehicle  with  burned-out 
lights,  faulty  brakes  or  other  mechanical 
defects  and  driving  with  an  invalid  or 
no  operator's  license. 

Peterson  said  he  realized  most  drivers 
are  law  abiding  and  many  of  them 
probabh'  resent  being  halted. 

"Frankly,  I  don't  blame  >ou,"  he 
told  them.  "But  by  pulling  that  driuik 
driver  or  that  car  with  bad  brakes  off 
the  road,  we  might  be  preventing  a  fatal 
accident  in  which  you  were  destined  to 
be  an  innocent  victim." 

Almost  170,000  vehicles  were  halted 
in  traffic  checks  o\er  the  Christmas  and 
New  Year's  holiday-  last  year  with  more 
than  3500  citations  and  nearly  6500 
written  warnings  issued. 


ACME  GLASS  COMPANY 

JOSEPH  A.  MENGELT,  Prop. 


MODESTO 


710  "G"  STREET 
Phone  3226 


CALIFORNIA 


BENSON  AND  ZIMMERMAN 

AUTOMOTIVE   PARTS 

Phone  2600 
IITH  AND  "H"  STREETS 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


NATIONAL  DOLLAR  STORE 

Where  Your  Dollar  Buys  More 

1024  TENTH  STREET 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

DANNY'S 

FINE  FOOD    •    COCKTAILS 


MODESTO 


Phone  5610 
415  "H"  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


THE  COBBLE'S  MOTEL 

MR.   AND   MRS.   M.   FELLONNEAU.  Owners 

P.  O.  Box  1162 — Phone  3204 
SOUTH  ON  HIGHWAY  99 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

JOHN    N.    ROCHA 

Livestock  Transportation  Night  and  Day 

Route  No.  6,  Box  1062 — Phone  5434 

On   Highway  99   1   Mile 

On  Highway  99  One  and  a  Half  Miles  North  of 
MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


ARCH     CLUB 

826  NINTH  STREET 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

New  Canton   Grill  -  Chop  Suey 

Excellent  Chinese  and  American  Dishes 
We  Put  Up  Orders  to  Take  Out 

lOOS  TENTH  STREET — Phone  5582 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


NEW  DEAL  MARKET 

We  Sell  for  Less  at  All  Times 

402  FOURTEENTH  STREET 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

GRAYSTONE  TILE  PLANT 

PETER  JANDPAUL.   Prop. 

Manufacturers  of  Hi-Test  Building  Blocks 

RIVER  ROAD.  WEST  OF  HIGHWAY  99 

Phone  3108-W 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


J.  S.  WEST  AND  CO. 

A  HOME  INSTITUTION 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


MANTECA  VARIETY  STORE 

GEO.  LAURITSON,  Prop. 

MANTECA  CALIFORNIA 

O.     C.     COTTRELL 

FEED  AND  EGGS 

MANTECA  CALIFORNIA 

BROWN'S   FRIGID   FREEZE 

Let  Us  Help  You  with  Your  Meat  Problems 
Complete  Cutting:  and  Curing  Service 

WEST  YOSEMITE— Phone  97 

MANTECA  CALIFORNIA 


Page  20 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1 953 


PECKS    BAIT   AND    SPORT    SHOP 

ROY  PECK,  Prop. 
725  7TH  STREET — Phone  2-4207 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

M.  FURTADO,  Prop. 

FLOR  DE  MEXICO  CAFE 

MEXICAN  DINNERS    •    BEER  AND  WINE 
Phone  3-3873 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL    UNION 

7021/2  SEVENTH  STREET 
MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

Hemler's  California  Poultry  Marke* 

502  H  STREET 

Pan  Ready  Fryers    •    Cut  Pieces 

Choice  Turkeys  and  Rabbits 

Phone  3-38 J  6 


JEP'S  STEAK  HOUSE 

Choice  Steak  Dinners  from  Stall-Fed  Beef 

Southern  Fried  Chicken  and  Merchants  Lunch 

Air  Conditioned 

601   "H"  STREET 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


P  and  G  HOME  APPLIANCES 

Washers    •    Ironers    •    Home  Freezers 

Dutch  Oven  Gas  Ranges 

We  Repair  All  Makes  of  Washers 

508  "H"  STREET— Phone  1703-W 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


CALIFORNIA  MEAT  MARKET 


916  "H"  STREET 
Phone  819 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


J.   F.  DICKINSON  COMPANY 

RADIO    •    RECORDS    •    HOME  APPLIANCES 
Your  Westinghouse  Dealer 

716  TENTH  STREET 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

GARY'S  BICYCLE  SHOP 

Small  Appliances  for  the  Home 
Also  Complete  Bicycle  Repairing 


MODESTO 


705  EYE  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


WALTER'S    VARIETY 

ED  WALTER.  Owner 


MODESTO 


Sc,  10c,  25c  AND  UP 
60S  "H"  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


MODESTO  AUTO  PARTS 


MODESTO 


1024  G  STREET 
Phone  3-3281 


CALIFORNIA 


Simvoulakis,  Bettencourt  &  Koutros 

PAYROLL  CHECKS  CASHED 

FINE  LIQUORS,  WINES  AND  BEER 

804  NINTH  STREET 


MODESTO 


CALIFORNIA 


EL    CAPITAL 

913  "J"  STREET 

Phone  5659 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 

FARMER'S     INN 

W.  M.  CAPEN,  Prop. 

Phone  5617 

716  NINTH  STREET 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


(Continued  from  page  18) 
prior  instance,  when  the  country's  forces 
had  engaged  in  conflict,  many  of  the 
ine\itable  casualties  were  unidentifiable. 
Furthermore,  it  had  frequently  happened 
that  the  identity  of  survivors  was  often 
difficult  to  establish,  thus  hampering  the 
government's  efforts  to  recompense  its 
deserving  veterans. 

Cost  Excessive 

For  many  years  before  fingerprinting 
was  available,  it  had  been  necessary  to 
send  representatives  about  the  country 
seeking  conclusive  evidence  to  prove  the 
identity  of  former  soldiers  claiming  pen- 
sion or  other  indemnities.  1  he  cost  of 
this  program  was  excessive,  often  amount- 
ing to  many  thousands  of  dollars  in  a 
single  instance.  All  such  perplexity  was 
of  course  eliminated  by  fingerprints,  their 
economic  superiority  being  well  proven 
subsequently  by  the  fact  that  over  three 
and  one-half  million  First  AVorld  War 
veterans  applying  for  compension  were 
identified  by  fingerprints  at  an  average 
cost  of  less  than  one  cent  each. 

It  is  certain  that  hearty  appreciation 
followed  the  replacement  of  a  s^'Stem 
that  had  long  been  expensive,  inadequate, 
and  definitely  unsatisfactory,  for  finger- 
printing soon  became  a  boon  in  the  pre- 
vention of  fraudulent  enlistment,  the  ap- 
prehension of  deserters,  and  the  detection 
of  false  claims,  as  well  as  the  insurance 
and  protection  of  both  identity  and  prop- 
erty for  all  the  many  persons  in  military 
service.  With  the  eventuality  of  illness, 
accident,  or  death,  the  fingerprinting  rec- 
ord stood  as  an  incontestable  voucher  for 
the  security  of  the  subject  and  the  wel- 
fare of  his  dependents. 

Navy  Follows 

Following  the  Army's  example,  the 
executives  of  the  United  States  Navy 
officially  installed  fingerprinting  January 
1,  1907,  the  program  eventually  includ- 
ing registration  both  of  enlisted  men  and 
officers.  And  here  again  is  recognized 
the  influence  of  John  Kenneth  Ferrier, 
since  one  of  his  students,  Mrs.  Mary 
Holland,  who  studied  identification  prac- 
tices also  in  Europe,  is  credited  with  hav- 
ing instructed  United  States  naval  lead- 
ers in  fingerprinting  technique.  Mrs. 
Holland  pioneered  extensively  as  an  in- 
structor, and  brought  the  principles  of 
fingerprint  procedure  to  a  great  many 
enforcement  bodies,  earning  the  distinc- 
tive title  of  "the  first  American  finger- 
print teacher." 

As  with  every  prior  general  adapta- 
tion, fingerprinting  at  once  ended  many 
of  the  navy's  troubling  identification 
problems  with  a  prompt  completion.    No 


SING  LEE  LAUNDRY 

716  SEVENTH  STREET 
Phone  2074 

MODESTO  CALIFORNIA 


BERVERDOR,    INC. 

48  WEST  ELEVENTH  STREET 

TRACY  CALIFORNIA 

THE    STAG 

A.  COSTA  and  I.  J.  MARANISE,  Props. 

Cocktails  and  Mixed  Drinks    ■    Choice  Wines 

Beer    •    Liquors    •    Where  Oldtimers  Meet 

IS  WEST  SIXTH  STREET 

TRACY  CALIFORNIA 

F.    W.    TRETZEL 

PLUMBING    •    PUMP  AND  WINDMILL  WORK 

P.  O.  Box  43 — Phone  30 
1155  SECOND  STREET 

LIVERMORE  CALIFORNIA 

SHORTY'S  TIRE  EXCHANGE 

Recapping  and  Dayton  Thorobred  Tires 

1154  WEST  SECOND  STREET 

Phone  110 

LIVERMORE  CALIFORNIA 

THE    HUB 

JOSEPH  E.  DUARTE,  Owner 

BAR  AND  CAFE 
WINE    •    UQUOR    •    BEER 

1050  FIRST  STREET 

LIVERMORE  CALIFORNIA 


BAILOR 


TRACY 


EBELL 


B    &    E    CLUB 


728  CENTRAL 


CALIFORNIA 


PASTIME  POOL  HALL 

LAURENT  ETCHEMENDY 

LIQUORS  AND  MIXED  DRINKS 

1   CENTRAL  AVENUE — Phone  636 

TRACY  CALIFORNIA 

ARTHUR    ABRAM 

Tailored  Seat  Covers,  Auto  Tops  and  Upholstery 
Truck  and  Tractor  Cushions 

19  WEST  SEVENTH  STREET 

TRACY  CALIFORNIA 

UNION   OIL  STATION 

OLIMPIO  BORGES 
Oil  -  Tires  -  Batteries  -  Accessories  -  Lubrication 

Phone  1587W  Grant  Line 
TRACY  CALIFORNIA 


OLD   MISSION   BAKERY 

BETTER  BAKING 


50  W.  lOTH 
Telephone  707 


TRACY 


CALIFORNIA 


TRACY    INN 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE   •   COFFEE  SHOP 

26  WEST  ELEVENTH  STREET 

TRACY  CALIFORNIA 


I'chruary    1 953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  21 


The    First   National   Bank 
of  Monterey 

A   Bank  of  Service  and  Stability 

Member  F.D.I. C.  and 
Federal  Reserve  System 


439  Alvadado  Street 

Monterey  California 


Phone  709 

TONY'S 

A  Good  Place  to  Eat 

ON  THE  HIGHWAY 

Tracy  California 


SHOP  AT  THE 

D  A  Y  LI  T  E 

MARKET 

Finest  Meats 

Quality  Groceries 

Fresh  Vegetables 


Tracy 


California 


CREAMERY 

Wholesale  and  Retail 

42  West  Tenth  Street 

Tracy  California 


longer  was  it  possible  for  fugitives  from 
justice  and  other  undesirables  to  seek  ref- 
uge in  government  service  under  aliases. 
Nor  coulil  imposters  lay  claim  to  un- 
earned compensation,  and  bona  fide  pen- 
sioners' entitlements  were  promptly  and 
conveniently  established.  Another  com- 
mon form  of  deception  was  eliminated, 
that  in  which  unscrupulous  applicants 
would  frequently  enlist  at  a  recruiting 
station,  accept  the  government  monies 
advanced  for  subsistence  and  transporta- 
tion to  the  chosen  place  of  service  at  some 
distant  point,  and  then  fail  to  report 
there  for  duty.  Furthermore,  lost  or  de- 
stroyed discharge  papers  and  other  per- 
sonal government  documents  were  read- 
il\'  replaced  with  minimum  inconvenience 
to  all  concerned.  And  as  with  the  army, 
when  battle  or  calamity  took  lethal  toll, 
an  honorable  interment  could  be  ac- 
corded the  fallen,  some  of  whom  would 
otherwise  have  occupied  nameless  graves. 

Pathetic  Episodes 

An  example  of  the  many  pathetic  epi- 
sodes which  followed  the  First  ^\'orld 
^Var  was  one  in  which  a  deluded  mother, 
whose  son  had  perished  in  France,  was 
victimized  by  an  imposter,  belie\ed  to  be 
her  lost  boy.  This  essayed  deception  re- 
sulted in  the  noteworthy  Frazer-Lopez 
case  at  Minneapolis,  where  fingerprints 
eventually  identified  the  pretender  as  not 
Arthur  Frazer,  but  one  Arthur  Lopez, 
thus  sparing  a  bereaved  parent  from  fur- 
ther delusion  by  a  designing  stranger. 

While  de  Forest,  McCloughry,  Fer- 
rier.  Faurot,  and  their  Eastern  contem- 
poraries were  pioneering  in  that  section 
of  America,  the  Pacific  coast  was  also 
keeping  pace.  In  the  state  prison  at  San 
Quentin,  California,  the  identification 
superintendent,  Frank  H.  De  Pue,  had 
started  taking  fingerprints  of  the  prison- 
ers, and,  in  1904,  that  institution  boasted 
a  promising  file  of  records.  DePue's 
energy  and  progressive  spirit  are  indi- 
cated by  the  fact  that  his  familiarity  with 
the  science  was  largely  self-acquired. 

Enthusiasm  Shared 
The  enthusiasm  which  De  Pue  mani- 
fested was  heartily  shared  by  a  number 
of  his  associates,  one  of  whom  was  Harry 
E.  Caldwell,  appointed  to  the  police  force 
in  Oakland,  California,  in  1903.  Cald- 
well had  studied  the  subject  of  identifi- 
cation before  joining  the  department.  At 
that  time  the  Oakland  police  had  an 
identification  bureau,  of  sorts,  and  were 
using  a  photographic  system  patterned 
after  earlier  British  methods,  with  some 
anthropometric  measurements  included. 
Caldwell's  interest  and  prior  research  in 
the  field  of  fingerprinting,  and  ballistics 
also,  led  to  his  being  placed  in  charge  of 
(Continufd  un  page  51) 


MAIDEN   LANE  JEWELERS 

silverware 
expert  watch  and  jewelry  repairing 

Diamonds    •    Watches    •    Jewelry 


47   MAIDEN   lane 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


The  Ship  Ahoy  Sea  Food  Restaurant 

ON  THE  BEACH 
AT  ENTRANCE  TO  WHARF 


SANTA  CRUZ 


CALIFORNIA 


PETER   PAN   LODGE 

FOR  DISCRIMINATING  PEOPLE 

AMERICAN   PLAN  ONLY 

Phone  7-3112 

CARMEL  HIGHLANDS 

CARMEL  CALIFORNIA 


Res.  Phone  7-6103 


BROOKS 


Phone  7-39S3 

WM  .     < 

PHOTOGRAPHIC  ILLUSTRATOR 

Weddings    •    Commercial    •    Publicity 

Advertising 

MONTE  VERDE  AND  EIGHTH 
P.  O.  Box  1095 

CARMEL  CALIFORNIA 


WHITNEY'S   RESTAURANT 

IN  THE  HEART  OF  CARMEL 
SINCE    1926 
Phone  8-9954 


CARMEL 


CALIFORNIA 


Antonelli   Bros.   Begonia  Gardens 

Nursery  Located  Three  Miles  East  of 

Santa  Cruz  on  Capitola  Road, 

One  Block  East  of  Live  Oak  School 

Telephone  5243 

2545  CAPITOLA  ROAD 

SANTA  CRUZ  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  4-6381— Teletype  W.T.  91 

i  A.  L.  RUSO,  INC. 

Erozeu  Emits  and 
Vegetables 

Plant  241  Walker  Street 

P.  O.  BOX  109 

Watsonville  California 


Page  22 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1953 


JAPANESE 
TEA  GARDEN 


In  the  Heart  of 
Golden  Gate  Park 


Near  De  Young  Museum 
and  Bandstand 


UNUSUAL  &  DISTINCTIVE 
GIFTS  &  SOUVENIRS 
FROM  THE  ORIENT 

Delicious  Tea  and  Cookies 
Served 

Open  Daily:  11  A.M.  to  5  P.M. 


"A    PURPLE   HEART" 

or 
"A    WHITE   CROSS" 

The  Decision  Rests  with  You 


Call 

The  Irwin 

Memorial 

Blood  Bank 

JOrdan  7-6400 
Or  Call 

The  Red  Cross 

PRospect  6-1500 


(Continued  from  page  3) 
doctrine  is  cleverly  fashioned,  lo  the 
weak  it  promises  strength;  to  the  hungry 
it  promises  food  ;  to  the  sick  it  promises 
medicine.  It  is  Tovvnsend  i'lan,  Pyra- 
mid Club,  and  perverted  Platonism,  com- 
bined with  just  enough  intellectual  half 
truths  to  make  it  palatable  to  all  classes. 

Disguised  Vision 

Our  greatest  error  in  the  past  was  the 
underestimating  of  this  threat.  We 
thought  a  little  good  natured  Fourth  of 
July  oratory  at  the  right  time  would  dis- 
pel the  menace  and  bring  the  faithless 
back  into  the  fold,  tears  in  their  eyes, 
and  the  Pledge  of  Allegiance  on  their 
lips.  We  were  surprised  when  it  did  not 
work  that  way.  ^Ve  were  amazed  to  find 
adherents  to  this  alien  philosophy  en- 
camped in  our  churches,  our  schools,  and 
in  our  government.  We  were  shocked 
into  a  re-discovery  that  Democracy  re- 
quires more  than  garrulity;  it  requires  a 
constant  practice  of  its  tenets  as  a  way 
of  life. 

Communism  came  to  these  shores  dis- 
guised as  a  vision  of  hope  and  pleasure. 
To  the  everlasting  credit  of  a  few  Amer- 
icans, the  age-old  enemy  in  new  disguise 
was  recognized  in  time.  They  ripped 
away  the  sequined  veils  for  us  and  we 
saw  communism  for  the  ancient  and  dis- 
eased harlot  it  is. 

Third  Dimension 

I  do  not  despair  or  fear  for  an  Amer- 
ica alert  to  the  dangers  of  these  first  two 
threats.  We  have  always  known  how  to 
meet  armed  aggression  and  we  have 
learned  to  meet  ideological  aggression. 
As  we  approach  the  eve  of  a  national 
election,  whatever  our  political  align- 
ment, we  are  pleased  to  note  the  major 
political  parties  differ  only  on  the  details 
of  meeting  these  threats,  and  are  in  full 
agreement  they  must  be  met. 

The  third  dimension  of  the  attack  on 
America  comes  wholly  from  within.  So 
uninformed  are  we  with  its  true  nature 
that  to  give  the  elemental  facts  known 
to  every  practicing  policeman,  is  to  brand 
the  speaker  as  an  alarmist.  So  compla- 
cent are  we  that  to  speak  of  it  in  the 
same  breath  with  a  fifth  column  and 
war,  is  to  court  ridicule.  And  so  warped 
are  some  of  our  early  virtues  that  to  ac- 
tively combat  it  at  every  level,  is  to  incur 
the  displeasure  of  those  who  regard  it  as 
a  right  and  the  wrath  of  those  who  know 
it  as  a  livelihood. 

Organized  Crime 

Organized  crime,  gentlemen,  unlike 
the  other  facets  of  the  attack  on  our 
country,  has  not  been  recognized  for  the 
potent  threat  it  is.  Like  earlier  civiliza- 
tions, we  build  our  walls  high  without 
attending    to    the    moral    timbers    which 


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Skilsaw,  Inc. 

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SUTRO  &  CO. 


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Fihriiiirv   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  23 


LO  CICERO 

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San  Francisco 

California 


COMPLIMENTS 


of  a 


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J.  &  L. 
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sustain  the  structure.  We  arm  against 
barbarians  without  and  seek  their  agents 
within,  but  calmly  ignore  the  fact  that 
self  -  destruction  -  barbarianism  within — 
can  accomplish  our  downfall  more  quick- 
ly than  an  enemy. 

To  understand  organized  crime,  it  is 
necessary  to  know  something  of  the 
growth  of  crime  in  America.  Until  the 
earl\-  1'520's,  lawlessness  in  America  was 
seldom  conducted  as  a  business  operation. 
A  few  criminals  banded  together  for  self 
protection  and  profit,  but  theirs  was 
usually  a  temporary  association — a  hit- 
-or-miss  animal,  with  no  purpose  except 
that  of  the  moment,  and  with  little  or- 
ganization and  planning. 

Social  Friction 

In  those  days,  crime  in  the  United 
States  was  not  regarded  as  a  major  prob- 
lem. Experts  viewed  it,  and  with  some 
justification,  as  part  of  the  social  friction 
generated  during  the  nation's  growth. 
They  reasoned  that  crime  would  dimin- 
ish as  America  settled  down  and  pros- 
pered. 

As  so  often  happens  with  experts,  they 
were  wrong.  They  forgot  to  allow  for 
the  fact  that  the  American  criminal, 
however  warped  his  nature,  possesses  the 
peculiar  American  genius  for  organizing. 
It  was  probably  inevitable  in  a  country 
where  business  became  huge,  complex, 
and  spectacularly  successful,  that  illegal 
business  would  develop  along  the  same 
pattern.  During  the  twenties,  crime  ex- 
perienced a  genuine  revolution.  Taking 
a  leaf  from  the  book  of  honest  merchan- 
dising, the  criminal  element  decided  to 
organize  and  adapt  to  environment  in 
order  to  profit  from  the  expanding  mar- 
ket. They  learned  the  value  of  business 
fronts  and  legitimate  appearances.  T  hey 
learned  the  value  of  quiet  suits,  mani- 
cured fingernails,  and  soft  voices.  1  hey 
learned  the  value  of  public  relations. 
Robbery,  burglary,  mayhem,  and  murder 
could  be  conducted  quietly  and  efficient- 
ly, but  always  as  a  last  resort  when 
threat  and  chicanery  failed.  They  cre- 
ated a  hierarchy  with  investors,  boards 
of  directors,  supervisors,  and  laborers. 
And  finalh'.  gentlemen,  they  created  an 
invisible  government  within  a  govern- 
ment, with  its  own  laws,  courts,  and 
executioners. 

Unholy  Wedge 

It  takes  only  a  single  fantastic  fact  to 
round  out  this  picture.  Paying  an  an- 
nual tax  of  billions  of  dollars  to  this 
invisible  government  and  faced  on  every 
hand  with  indisputable  proof  of  its  real- 
ity from  victims,  courts,  and  the  police, 
— the  .American  public  refuses  to  believe 
^       in  its  existence. 


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MACARTHUR  HOTEL 

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HAIGHT  &  BAKER  STREETS 

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FAY'S  CLUB 

"The  Place  Where  Friends  Meet" 

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Ovokuiovsky  General   Market 

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Seventeenth  and  Valencia  Streets 
San  Francisco,  California 


Page  24 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1953 


YOU'LL  FEEL  LIKE  NEW 

HAL'S  BARBER  SHOP 

208  CLEMENT  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE    SAPPHIRE 
Cocktails  •  Luncheons 

2888  SAN  BRUNO  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


ISLAIS    CREEK    TERMINAL   CORP. 


465  CALIFORNIA  STREET 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


AMERICAN  CAN  COMPANY 

111    SUTTER  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Colyear-Motor  Sales  Company 

2S  DIVISION  STREET 

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COMPLIMENTS 

of  a 

FRIEND 


BAXTER  TRADING  COMPANY 

416  JACKSON  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BERT  BADER  ELECTRIC 

MOTOR  REBUILDING 

10  HERON  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


When  I  speak  of  organized  crime,  I 
do  not  refer  to  the  pennyante  hoodlum, 
the  half  tramp,  half  thief,  the  alley  pros- 
titute, or  any  of  the  several  million  cheap 
criminals  who  are  a  nuisance  and  hazard 
on  our  streets.  When  I  speak  of  organ- 
ized crime  I  speak  of  a  tightly  knit,  disci- 
plined, arrogant,  and  worldly  wise  group 
who  make  crime  pay,  and  pay  ivell.  I 
speak  of  an  enterprise  which  has  driven 
an  unholy  wedge  into  our  ideals,  dividing 
personal  interest  and  morality  into  sepa- 
rate spheres:  from  which  division  flows 
a  stream  of  gold  into  the  coffers  of  the 
underworld.  I  speak  of  an  immensely 
wealthy  cartel  which  controls  mayors, 
state  legislators,  judges;  a  cartel  for 
whose  control  of  vital  voting  blocks  has 
brought  candidates  for  high  and  revered 
offices,  importuning  and  humble  to  its 
door. 

Not  Guesswork 

Let  me  make  it  abundantly  clear,  gen- 
tlemen. This  is  not  guesswork.  This  is 
not  theory  formulated  for  some  dubious 
advantage  by  a  Police  Chief  from  a  far 
western  state ;  views  which  may,  at  best, 
reflect  only  provincial  problems.  Perhaps 
a  few  quotations  will  dispel  such  doubts. 
First,  a  Democrat,  the  Honorable 
Estes  Kefauver,  whose  investigation,  al- 
though it  merely  scratched  the  hard  ve- 
neer of  organized  depravity,  planted  at 
least  a  seed  of  doubt  in  the  minds  of 
some  thinking  Americans.  The  Senator 
had  this  to  say : 

"A  nation-wide  crime  syndicate  does 
exist  in  the  United  States  of  America 
despite  the  protestations  of  a  strangely 
assorted  company  of  criminals,  self- 
ser\ing  politicians,  plain  blind  fools, 
and  others  who  may  be  honestly  mis- 
guided that  there  is  no  such  combine." 
Next,  a  Republican,  and  respected  ex- 
president  of  this  nation,  the  Honorable 
Herbert  Hoover,  had  this  to  say: 

"The  greatest  danger  (today)  is 
not  by  invasion  of  foreign  armies.  Our 
dangers  are  that  we  may  commit  sui- 
cide from  within  by  compliance  with 
evil  or  by  public  tolerance  of  scanda- 
lous behavior.  These  evils  have  de- 
feated many  nations  many  times  in 
history." 

Volume  of  Crime 
I  do  not  believe  it  is  necessary  to  am- 
plify these  statements  with  those  of 
prominent  jurists,  clergymen,  educators, 
respected  industrialists,  and  respected  la- 
bor heads.  Leaders  from  every  segment 
of  our  society  have  voiced  similar  warn- 
ings. 

My  purpose  here  today  is  not  to  repeat 
that  warning.  The  cry  "wolf"  has  al- 
ready been  given.  Lest  that  cry  be  ig- 
nored, I  propose  to  identify  the  "wolf," 


CAMPAIGNS,    INC. 

CLEM  WHITAKER  and  LEONE  BAXTER 

1605-6-7  DE  YOUNG  BUILDING 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


S.  &  C.  Construction  Company 

1141  CAYUGA  AVENUE 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

FARMERS  RICE  GROWERS 
Cooperative 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


INEZ    GARRETT 

TEACHER  OF  MUSIC 
General  Theory    •    Harmony 
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EVergreen  6-2649 
550  -  36TH  AVENUE 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


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VOGUE   REWEAVING  STUDIO 

Burns  -  Tears  -  Moth  Holes  -  Stains  -  Cuts 

in  Garments,  Rugs  and  Upholstered  Furniture 

REWOVEN  BY  HAND 

1143  TARAVAL  STREET 
Near  22nd  Avenue 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


ZENTER  &  LEVY  COMPANY 

200  WASHINGTON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

VALVOLINE  OIL  COMPANY 

1300  -  17TH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

FREDERICKS  PAINT  SHOP 

425  DE  HARO  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


February   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  25 


WILDE  AVENUE  GROCERY 

201    WILDE  AVENUE 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

O.  L  KING  &  CO. 

INDUSTRIAL  CHEMICALS  &  OILS 
LAUNDRY  DETERGENTS 

436  CLEMENTINA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

S  K  BARBER   SHOP 

LADIES'  AND  CHILDREN'S 
HAIR  CUTTING 

"You're  Next"   for  the  Best 
Haircut  &  Shave 

6314  GEARY  BOULEVARD 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BEARINGS 

ALLAN  P.  JAMES  COMPANY,  Inc. 

430  NINTH  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


THE  TUX  CLUB 

1204  MARKET  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

The  West's  Largest  Ford  Dealer 

S  &  C  MOTORS 

Home  of  the  "Miracle  Deal" 

2001   MARKET  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

"BRANDS  YOU  KNOW" 

WESTERN   EMPIRE   DIRECT 
ADVERTISING  CO. 

612  HOWARD  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FRANCIS  WOOD  COMPANY 

1026  MERCHANTS  EXCHANGE  BLDG. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


chart  the  direction  in  which  it  is  moving, 
measure  its  distance  from  your  door,  and 
describe  the  methods  of  its  attack. 

A  good  beginning  is  to  measure  the 
volume  of  crime  in  America.  There  are 
three  and  one  half  million  known  crimi- 
nals residing  in  our  midst,  a  group  about 
equal  in  size  to  our  entire  armed  forces. 
This  group  injures  us  at  the  rate  of  one 
major  crime  every  18  seconds,  a  million 
and  one  half  major  crimes  annually.  A 
murder  is  committed  ever>  45  minutes 
— during  the  last  twenty-four  hours,  7 
persons  died  violently  in  this  manner.  It 
is  estimated  150,000  murderers  are  at 
large  on  our  streets  and  another  200,000 
persons  now  living  will  murder  300,000 
persons  before  they  die. 

Two  Billion  Dollars 

Ignoring  for  a  moment  the  suffering 
representeti  by  these  figures,  let  us  assess 
the  damages  in  dollars  and  cents.  A  con- 
servative figure  on  the  cost  of  each  major 
crime,  taking  into  account  injuries,  prop- 
erty loss,  arrest  costs,  court  costs,  and  in 
event  of  conviction,  prison  costs,  would 
be  in  the  nature  of  a  thousand  dollars. 
Thus  the  immediate  and  direct  cost  of 
major  crime  would  be  between  one  and 
two  billion  dollars. 

The  indirect  cost  of  crime  is  somewhat 
higher.  If  you  take  a  garment  to  the 
cleaner,  purchase  a  fryer  for  dinner,  or 
seek  entertainment  in  the  evening,  a  size- 
able part  of  the  payment  goes  as  tax  to 
organized  crime.  Part  of  your  rising 
insurance  rates  have  been  influenced  by 
crime.  The  smallest  part  of  this  cost, 
and  the  only  part  which  the  public  ap- 
pears to  recognize  and  regret,  is  the  cost 
of  maintaining  law  enforcement  services. 
1  his  ludicrous  attitude  is  similar  to  com- 
plaining about  the  cost  of  water  used  to 
keep  a  conflagration  from  destroying 
your  home. 

Twenty  Billion 

In  addition  to  the  direct  and  indirect 
cost  of  major  crime,  our  economy  is  af- 
fected by  dollars  siphoned  out  of  creative 
economy  and  into  gambling.  Aproxi- 
mately  twenty  billion  dollars  change 
hands  annually  in  this  manner.  Is  this 
important  to  the  business  man  ?  Are  his 
profits  influenced  by  the  fact  that  a  sig- 
nificant portion  of  the  nation's  wealth — 
twenty  billion  unproductive  dollars — cir- 
culates outside  the  sphere  of  legitimate 
business  activity?  To  answer  this,  I 
want  to  introduce  a  slogan  adopted  by 
the  businessmen  of  Los  Angeles.  "  The 
htiek  that  goes  to  the  bookie  does  not  go 
into  business.'"  The  consumer  dollar  lost 
on  the  horses,  at  the  crap  table,  into  the 
slot  machine,  or  in  the  poker  parlor,  does 
not  purchase  food,  clothing,  housing,  or, 
to  bring  it  close  to  home,  the  product  of 


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Free   Fast   Delivery 


A   Personal   Service 


LOMBARD   LIQUOR  STORE 

Ice  Cubes  with  Orders 

1418  LOMBARD  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


RAY  AND  JOE'S  SERVICE 

SE.  1-9936 
31ST   &  IRVING 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


S.  &   M.  AUTO   REPAIR 

2340  LOMBARD  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL   FRANCIS 

346  SUTTER  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  JU.  4-5400 

ERKSON'S  CHEVRON   SERVICE 

CHERVON  GAS  STATION 

GEORGE  ERKSON 

4801    MISSION  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

GOODWILL   INDUSTRIES 

986  HOWARD  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  26 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February  1953 


SANG  WO  &  COMPANY 

867  GRANT  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE     GATES 

ALWAYS  A  FRIENDLY  WELCOME 
1116  FILLMORE  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FLORENCE  ART  COMPANY 

1612  HARRISON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HIGH   GRADE  FRENCH  LAUNDRY 

1558  BUSH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SANFORD  CLEANERS 

Wholesale  Cleaning  and  Dyeing 
270-274  VALENCIA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HAAS  WOOD  &  IVORY  WORKS 

64  CLEMENTINA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MONA'S  CANDLELIGHT 

473  BROADWAY 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE  BO  WONG 

Enchanted  Jewels 
803  JACKSON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WING  DUCK  CO. 

928  GRANT  AVENUE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

LEO'S  LIQUOR   STORE 

HENRY  WEHRENBERG 
670  CHENERY  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CLAYT0M   GROCERY 

1501   WALLER  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Hill-Top  Barber  &   BeaiDl-y  Shop 

159-161   HILL  TOP  ROAD 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

News  Years  Greetings  to  All 
Police  and  Peace  Officers 

CHINESE  METHODIST  CHURCH 

920  WASHINGTON  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HENRY  SEWING  SHOP 

1038  POWELL  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


"the  automatic  vending  machine.  Your 
industry's  share  of  that  unproductive 
twenty  billion — that  parasitic  twenty  bil- 
lion— that  lost  twenty  billion,  might 
well  mean  profit  or  bankruptcy  in  lean 
years  ahead. 

These  billions  have  not  only  made  or- 
ganized crime  wealthy  and  powerful,  but 
open  the  way  to  expansion  of  the  under- 
world empire  through  legitimate  and 
quasi  legitimate  investments.  The  iden- 
tity of  the  organizations  which  make  up 
this  empire  are  known. 

Mafia 

The  most  ominous  of  all  criminal  car- 
tels is  a  group  known  as  the  Mafia. 
While  some  may  doubt  that  the  Mafia 
that  had  its  roots  in  Sicily  is  the  same  or- 
ganization that  exists  in  America  today, 
no  authority  will  question  the  existence 
of  a  Mafia  type  organization  of  tremen- 
dous proportions,  and  the  end  result  is 
the  same.  The  Mafia  is  marked  by  an 
ancient  code  that  binds  all  of  its  mem- 
bers to  the  following  tenets: 

( 1 )  Reciprocal  aid  in  case  of  any 
need  whatsoever. 

(2)  Absolute  obedience  to  the 
Chief. 

(3)  An  offense  received  by  one  of 
the  members  must  be  considered  an 
offense  to  the  entire  organization,  and 
must  be  avenged  at  any  cost. 

(4)  Never  recur  to  the  state's  au- 
thorities for  justice. 

(5)  Never  reveal  the  names  of 
members  of  the  organization. 

Only  the  Dead 

The  early  password  of  the  Mafia  be- 
speaks its  character:  E  riiortc  solo  non 
rcturncro;  e  dcmenticnto  rcturncro," 
which  means  "only  the  dead  do  not  re- 
turn; he  who  has  forgotten  will  return." 
The  purpose  of  the  password  is  to  fully 
impress  upon  the  members  of  the  Mafia 
that  the  penalty  for  the  failure  to  remain 
sil"nt  is  death. 

It  is  difficult  to  believe  the  Mafia  ex- 
ists. Even  to  a  policeman  who  knows  its 
members,  traces  of  its  activities,  and  in- 
vestigates its  murders,  there  is  something 
unreal  about  an  ancient  code  of  "silence 
or  death"  existing  in  the  twentieth  cen- 
tury. \et  it  does  exist,  and  its  inner 
crcle  of  members  do  control  organized 
crime  in  America ! 

The  interests  of  the  Mafia  are  varied. 
It  is  active  in  gambling  and  wire  serv- 
ices, narcotics,  counterfeiting,  white  slav- 
ery, and  slot  machine  rackets.  Its  semi- 
legitimate  interests  include  produce  dis- 
tribution, the  olive  oil  industry,  the  to- 
mato paste  industry,  breweries,  distillers, 
night  clubs,  hotels,  and  again  closer  to 
home,  vending  machine  supply  and  serv- 
ice.   This  is  only  a  partial   list.     In  one 


HOTEL    ARLIN 

2186  UNION  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

GENE  K.  WALKER  PRODUCTIONS 

465  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  LETTER  SHOP 

214  MISSION  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SPICE  ISLANDS  COMPANY 

610  FOLSOM  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BREMOND   SERVICE  STATION 

GEARY  &  STEINER  STREETS 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Sutter  Furniture  Mfg.  Company 

53  WALLER  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Randolph   R.  Clement  Agency 

DIRECT  MAIL  PLANNED,  PRODUCED 
MAILING  LISTS 

16  FIRST  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

VICTOR  E.   ROTH  &  ASSOCIATES 

24  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MARGARET'S  MARKET 

485  -  30TH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS    of    POULTRY    DEPARTMENT 

NEW  MISSION   MARKET 

2584  MISSION  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

"TRY  US  AND  COMPARE" 

ZEPHYR  CLEANERS  &  DYERS 

Plant  Operated  on  Premises 

Expert  Alteration  and  Repairing 

4001    BALBOA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ZAM  ZAM  COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

1633  HAIGHT  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BRANSTETTER  AND  ZAFFKE 

701   PORTOLA  DRIVE 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Robertson  Trucking  &  Grading  Co. 

63-71  MORRIS  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FchriKiry    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  27 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

L.  H.  WILLIAMS  Gen.  Contractor 

298  NINTH  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


ROSE  BOWL  LIQUORS 

3045  ARMY  STREET 
Corner  Alabama 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WALLACE-ZORN   PHOTOS 

389  VALENCIA  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SEabright   1-1160 

SARATOGA  BEAUTY  SALON 

Permanent  Waving,  Hair  Cutting  Tinting 
3800  NORIEGA  STREET 
Entrance   on   45th   Ave. 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CUMMINS'  GROCERY 

1240  REVERE  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   JU.    6-1309 

CASTELLI  WINES  &  LIQUORS 

MARIO  CASTELLI 

974  GENEVA  AVENUE 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

RAY  DUCA  Liquors 

WINES  •  BEER  •  LIQUORS  •  MIXES 

FREE  DELIVERY 

JUniper  7-6572 

4712  MISSION  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MARTEX  FRENCH  LAUNDRY 

CURTAINS  •  RUGS   •   BLANKETS 
Tel.  DEIaware  3-9498     Henry  J.  Arribere  &  Sons 

1163  GENEVA  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

DUTCH   BOY  PAINT  STORE 

NATIONAL  LEAD  COMPANY 

Phone  HEmlock   1-8929 

1295  FOLSOM  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S   FOUNTAIN 

503  CLEMENT  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  EMPRESS 

WORKING  MAN'S  HOTEL 

144  EDDY  STREET 
Between  Mason  and  Taylor 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WILBER    HOTEL 

328  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

DR.  C.  M.  CHOW 

824  STOCKTON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

"GET  YOUR  KICKS"  AT  THE 

HOUSE  OF  NIX 

1135  OCEAN  AVENUE 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


city,  it  may  control  laundry  service,  in 
another  transportation,  in  another  union 
acti\itics,  and  in  still  another  onh'  the 
political  offices  necessary  to  allow  open 
\  ice  activities.  In  \  iew  of  the  growing 
narcotic  menace,  it  is  interesting  to  know 
the  Mafia  plays  an  important  part  in  the 
illegal  narcotic  trade. 

Legitimate  Enterprise 

In  recent  \ears,  organized  crime, 
through  this  organization  has  moved  in- 
creasingly into  the  field  of  legitimate 
business  enterprise.  The  coin  machine 
industry  is  one  of  their  targets.  They 
plan  to  take  over  supply  and  service,  dis- 
tribution, and  ultimately,  manufactur- 
ing. They  plan  this  because  the  coin 
machine  industry  is  considered  ideal  for 
their  needs.  They  have  available  intimi- 
dation and  strong  arm  experts  so  success- 
ful in  persuading  small  proprietors  of  the 
advantages  of  one  machine  over  another. 
Existing  punch  board,  horse  race  infor- 
mation, and  bookie  chains  can  be  counted 
upon  to  supply  new  customers  and  con- 
trol old  ones. 

You  have  informed  me  of  your  inter- 
est in  preventing  such  an  eventuality. 
On  this  score,  let  us  be  frank.  A  legiti- 
mate operator,  limited  to  operation  with- 
in the  law,  alone  cannot  compete  with 
the  criminal.  If  his  machines  are 
wrecked,  his  only  recourse  is  civil  suit  or 
criminal  complaint.  Both  are  lengthy 
processes  dependent  upon  proof,  which 
may  be  an  illusive  thing  if  the  city  is 
inefficiently  policed.  If  employees  are 
strong  armed,  he  can  only  hire  and  train 
new  employees — if  he  can  find  men  will- 
ing to  face  injury  or  death  for  a  modest 
salary.  If  his  own  life,  or  the  life  of  his 
loved  ones,  is  threatened,  he  can  complain 
to  the  police — and  trust  those  lives  to  a 
guard  who  may  prove  incompetent.  And, 
finally  if  the  businessman  elects  to  fight 
fire  with  fire,  employ  weapons,  thugs, 
intimidation — he  will  find  himself  in  a 
strange  field,  unacquainted  with  the 
tricks  of  the  new  trade,  and  he  himself 
may  be  the  one  whom  the  law  punishes 
while  the  criminal  is  left  free  to  take 
over  the  business  without  resistance. 

Leading  Citizens 

Professional  considerations  do  not  al- 
low me  TO  list  all  the  Mafia  and  under- 
world leaders.  In  many  cases  Mafia  lead- 
ers and  their  associates  assume  the  role 
of  leading  citizens,  contributors  to 
worthy  charities,  and  solid  men  of  afifairs. 
Their  real  identity  would  come  as  a 
crude  shock  to  many  of  the  civic  leaders 
of  the  communities  in  which  they  reside. 
I  he  Mafia  is  nationwide  in  its  scope, 
and  its  tentacles  reach  into  cities  and 
towns  throughout  the  length  and  breadth 
of  America. 


GARNERO'S  GROCERTERIA 

FINEST  OF  GROCERIES 

"At  the  Right  Prices" 

FREE  DELIVERY 

544  EXCELSIOR  AVE. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HOTEL  TIMES 


480  GEARY  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ROYAL   FURNITURE  COMPANY 

king  of  values 

1032  McAllister  street 

san  francisco california 

BRIZARD   &  YOUNG 

72  TEHAMA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DIESEL  SERVICE  COMPANY 

234  SEVENTH  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

LAUNDRY  SERVICE  ALTERATIONS 

SWIFT  CLEANERS 

For  Quality  and  Service 
Prompt  Pickup  and  Delivery 

3826  NORIEGA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MOLONYS  PHARMACY 

16TH  and  GUERRERO  STREETS 

SAN  FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

A.  W.   MAKEPEACE 

991   TENNESSEE  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

BLUE   BIRD  CAFE 

3149  22ND  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HARRY'S  SERVICE 

3198  MISSION  ST.  at  VALENCIA 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


Grand  Opportunity 

If  you  are  retired — about  to  retire — or 
young  couple  starling  for  yourself,  we 
have  the  ideal  setup  for  you.  Mariposa 
Theatre  for  sale;  cash  or  small  down  pay- 
ment and  pay  as  you  earn.  Doing  splendid 
business,  new  projection  and  sound  equip- 
ment. Ideal  location  as  to  weather;  in  the 
midst  of  fine  fishing  and  hunting  terri- 
tory. In  the  wide  open  spaces  away  from 
the  hustle  and  bustle  of  the  big  city.  We 
invite  your  careful  inspection  of  the  prop- 
erty and  the  town.  For  further  informa- 
tion, write: 

W.  G.  Allen 

P.  O.  Box  47 
Riverdale,  California 


Page  28 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fcliruary   1 953 


THE  SUGAR  BOWL 

3703  20TH  STREET 


SAN  FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


PAT  &  MAME'S  BEAUTY  SALON 

3006  ARMY  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

AVENUE  AUTO  PARTS 

2410  SAN  BRUNO  AVENUE 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YOUNG'S  LAUNDRY  &  CLEANERS 

193  VALENCIA  STREET 

Near  Duboce  Ave. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ANSGAR  LUTHERAN  CHURCH 

152  CHURCH  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL  BRISTOL 

56  MASON  STREET 
Weekly  and  Permanent  Rates 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

SUE  TALLMAN   EMBROIDERY 
COMPANY 

2250  PALOU  AVENUE 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

LUCAS  GROCERY 

2929  24TH  STREET 


SAN  FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


SVANE  AND  COMPANY  -  Draying 

195  DE  HARO  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

LIQUORS — BEER— WINES — FRESH  MEAT 
GROCERIES— FRUITS — VEGETABLES 

LEAVENWORTH   MARKET 

1762  LEAVENWORTH  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YEN  YEN   CAFE 

CHINESE  &  AMERICAN  DISHES 
716  KEARNY  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

MISS  MILLICENT  WILLIAMS 

INTERIOR  DECORATOR 
1840  GREEN  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

THE  MUSIC   BOX 

1618  SECOND   STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


\Vith  the  exception  of  the  Grand 
Council,  the  Mafia  is  in  the  nature  of  a 
loose  federation.  Common  interest  has 
long  since  placed  a  ban  on  gangland  war- 
fare and  the  federation,  based  on  unwrit- 
ten agreements,  grows  stronger  each 
year.  Warfare  has  been  replaced  with 
execution  under  the  unwritten  laws  of 
this  invisible  government. 

Two  Murders 

May  I  cite  to  you  two  timely  in- 
stances of  this  cooperation  which  oc- 
curred on  the  Pacific  Coast.  During  th? 
investigation  of  two  murders  in  the  City 
of  Los  Angeles,  we  obtained  information 
which  had  caused  us  to  conclude  that 
these  murders  were  Mafia  executions. 
We  believe  that  the  decree  of  death  was 
handed  down  by  a  Mafia  court  that  con- 
vened in  the  Midwest.  The  Mafia  court 
is  unique  in  that  the  defendant  does  not 
appear  before  the  court  and  is  not  rep- 
resented by  counsel.  There  is  no  pro- 
vision for  bail,  writs  of  habeas  corpus,  or 
appeal.  After  the  court  rendered  its  de- 
cision in  this  particular  case,  a  member 
of  the  Mafia  was  summoned  from  the 
Pacific  Coast  to  another  \Vestern  city 
where  he  received  instructions  to  put 
into  effect  the  order  of  the  court.  His 
task  was  to  arrange  the  details  of  the 
execution.  Upon  his  return  to  our  area, 
he  consulted  with  the  local  head  of  the 
Mafia,  and  shortly  thereafter,  in  a  bi- 
zarre but  perfectly  planned  and  executed 
plot,  two  men  met  their  death  in  expia- 
tion for  the  crime  of  having  violated  the 
code  of  the  Mafia.  As  the  investigation 
progressed,  it  was  definitely  established 
that  the  widow  of  one  of  the  deceased 
was  withholding  information  from  the 
police  and  misrepresenting  facts  within 
her  knowledge.  When  confronted  with 
this  accusation,  she  in  effect  invoked  the 
age  old  tenet  of  the  Mafia  code  that  its 
members  never  seek  or  accept  the  aid  of 
lawfully  constituted  authorities  even 
though  they  themselves  may  be  the  vic- 
time  of  a  crime. 

Narcotic  Peddler 

A  second  case  which  remains  unsolved 
involves  a  narcotic  peddler  who  was  ar- 
rested while  transporting  narcotics  and 
who  consented  to  appear  as  a  witness  in 
a  federal  court  and  testify  against  his 
superiors.  Before  the  trial  court  could 
convene,  this  narcotic  peddler  was  found 
stretched  out  in  death  in  another  city 
and  the  bullet  hole  in  his  head  bore  mute 
evidence  that  the  code  of  the  Mafia  had 
once  more  been  invoked. 

Daily  Growth 

The  menace  of  crime  is  found  not  so 
much  in  the  fact  it  exists,  as  in  the  fact 
it  daily  grows  in  size  and  power.  Crime 
statistics,  although  they  reflect  continued 


VOGUE  CLEANERS.   INC. 

77  MILLER  AVENUE 
MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 


WEST  END  VILLA 

1 1   G  STREET 

SAN  RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  BErkeley  7-4145 

Berkeley  Industrial  Supply,   Inc. 

MACHINE  SHOP  TOOLS  AND  SUPPLIES 
1003  PARDEE  STREET 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

FRUIT  MACHINERY  COMPANY 

F.  &  P.  PEACHING  PITTING  MACHINES 
FOOT  OF  HEINZ  AVENUE 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

THE  WALLPAPER  BOOK 

"FASHIONS  FOR  YOUR  HOME" 

By  Mona  E.  Lester  Dougherty 

1559  Solano  Avenue        Ph.  LAndscape  6-4637 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

REYNOLD  A.  MARIN 
AShberry  3-6171  — BErkeley  7-7187W 

A.  J.  MARIN  &  SONS 

CEMENT  CONTRACTORS 
STONE  WORK 

Office  and  Residence 

1040  MURRAY  STREET 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 


CAUDLE  UNION  SERVICE 

DWIGHT  WAY  AND  FULTON  STREET 

Telephone  BErkeley  7-8874 

UNIVERSITY  AND  OXFORD  STREET 

Telephone  BErkeley  7-9124 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

LA.  4-5242 

CORNETTI   &  SON 

Vacuum  Clean  Chimney  and  Repair 
PATIOS  -  BARBECUES 
OUTDOOR  FIREPLACES 

2413  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone  OLympic  21719 

Dr.  Joel   E.  Lewis,   M.D. 

and 

Dr.  Robt.  L.  Taylor,  M.D. 

1746  ALCATRAZ  AVENUE 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

JOHN  S.  SLOAN 

INSURANCE 
1535  SOLANO  AVENUE 

Telephones; 

Office — LAndscape  5-4740 

Residence — LAndscape  6-2650 

COMPLETE  INSURANCE  SERVICE 


BERKELEY 


CALIFORNIA 


Fch 


tOriKiry 


1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  29 


RITEWAY  CLEANERS  &   DYERS 

ABE  FISHER 
Cleaning — Dyein? — Pressing — We  Call  &  Deliver 
Alterations   &  Repairs-^Rug  &  Carpet   Cleaning 

Ph.  BErkeley  7-9298        2442  Dwight  Way 

BERKELE-l'  CALIFORNIA 

Phone:  TH.  3-5723 

TUNNEL  CLEANERS 

TAILORING— KNIT  BLOCKING 
3022   ASHBY   AVE. 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 

LAndscape  4-4080 

VILA  MOTEL 

NEW — MODERN — CONVENIENT 
1155  SAN  PABLO  AVE. — On  U.  S.  Hwy.  40 

BERKELEY  CALIFORNIA 


TRADEWAY  ■  Things  for  the  Home 

Telephones   BEacon  2-2263 

and  LAndscape  5-2379 
1230  SAN  PABLO  AVENUE 


EL  CERRITO 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  OLympic   3-3457 

JENOLITE  DISTRfBUTING  CO. 

Your  Rust  Problems  Solved 
with  "JENOLITE" 

1526  PARK  AVENUE 

EMERYVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


OAK 
CLUBROOM 


EMERYVILLE 
CALIFORNIA 


and  alarming  increases  in  certain  cate- 
gories of  major  crime,  do  not  give  an  ac- 
curate reading  tor  two  reasons: 

L  Crime  statistics  are  based  on  of- 
tenses  known  to  the  police.  This 
knowledge  embraces  those  crimes 
which  are  either  observed  by  the  po- 
lice or  reported  to  the  police.  Many 
times,  through  carelessness  in  minor 
cases,  or  fear  of  reprisals  in  major 
cases,  crimes  are  not  reported. 

2.  The  movement  of  organized 
crime  into  quasi  legitimate  opera- 
tions has  created  a  vast  twilight  zone 
of  criminality  which  never  leaves  an 
imprint  upon  a  police  blotter. 

Blackmail 

One  of  the  most  lucrative  sources  of 
income  to  the  lesser  minions  of  the  un- 
derworld is  the  crime  of  blackmail. 
1  hese  criminals  have  become  e.xpert  in 
creating  an  aura  of  fear  in  the  minds  of 
persons  who  have  exhibited  human  fraili- 
ties  and  who  pay  continuous  tribute  to 
prevent  exposure.  Even  though  the  po- 
lice may  be  aware  of  these  situations,  the 
victim  of  the  crime  will  rarely  reveal  his 
predicament.  Comparative  criminal  sta- 
tistics for  the  nation  as  a  whole  are  based 
on  the  reports  contributed  to  the  Federal 
Bureau  of  Investigation  by  the  local  law 
enforcement  agencies.  Inaccuracies  in 
such  reporting  destroy  the  validity  of 
these  statistics  as  is  evidenced  by  the  fact 
that  one  of  the  large  cities  in  the  nation 
does  not  contribute  to  this  pool  of  crime 
data  as  their  reports  are  considered  in- 
accurate, and  are  not  acceptable  to  the 
Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation. 

Furthermore,  the  entire  gamut  of 
criminal  justice  affords  innumerable  op- 
portunities for  the  guilty  to  escape  pun- 
ishment. Individual  criminal  records  re- 
flect relatively  short  terms  for  those 
convicted  of  serious  crimes.  As  our  peni- 
tentiaries become  overcrowded,  there  is 
compelling  necessity  for  the  premature 
release  of  inmates  in  order  to  accommo- 
date constant  influx.  All  of  this,  of 
course,  is  discouraging  to  the  conscien- 
tious police  officer  as  he  represents  you 
in  the  war  against  the  criminal  element. 
It  is  extremely  frustrating  to  professional 
law  enforcement,  after  a  diligent  investi- 
gation and  prosecution,  to  witness  the 
criminal  either  escape  punishment  or  ob- 
tain early  release  because  of  connections. 

Twentj'  Percent  Increase 

In  a  recent  study  in  the  trends  of 
three  selected  crimes — robbery,  burglar) , 
and  auto  theft — and  using  the  data  re- 
ported to  the  FBI  by  10  of  the  largest 
cities  in  America,  we  determined  that 
since    1940    these    cities    experienced    a 


"CHICKEN  EVERY  SUNDAY" 
Good  Food  the  Rest  of  the  Week 

THE  EMERYVILLE  CAFE 

BETTY  and  BOB 
Piedmont  5-9334      4061  San  Pablo  Ave. 

EMERYVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


LAndscape  5-3383 


"Buy  with  Confidence" 


CARMEL   LIQUOR  STORE 

QUALITY  WINES  AND  LIQUORS 

GUS  LAKIS,  Owner 

1401   SOLANO  AVE.,  Corner  of  Carmel 

ALBANY  CALIFORNIA 

Bus.  I-And.  5-2021  Res.  LAnd.  5-3252 

FERRY  BATTERY  CO. 

BATTERY  MANUFACTURERS 
736  SAN  PABLO  AVE. 

ALBAN-i-  CALIFORNIA 

LAndscape  4-1814 

THE  SCRIBNER   REALTY 


Real  Estate 
1205  SOLANO  AVE. 


ALBANY 


CALIFORNIA 


LEE  THRAPP 

SAN   LEANDRO   UPHOLSTERY 

SWeetwDod  8-6332 
271    DAVIL  STREET 

SAN   LEANDRO  CALIFORNIA 

RANDY'S  FROZEN   MEATS 

BEEF,   PORK  AND  VEAL 

Phone  LO.  8-7990 

1855  WASHINGTON  AVENUE 

SAN  LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

Branch  Offices:  Los  Angeles. 
Salt  Lake  City,  Portland 

INSURED  TRANSPORTERS,   INC. 

R.   S.   Koenig 
INTERSTATE  TRUCK  CARRIERS 

LOckhaven  8-8422 
251   PARK  STREET 

SAN  LEANDRO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  LAndscape  6-2535 

DR.  VICTOR  STALLONE.  Jr..  M.D. 

1393  SOLANO  AVENUE 

ALBANY  CALIFORNIA 


OLympic  2-9700 

FRIGIDAIRE    SALES 
CORPORATION 

APPLIANCES  •  COMMERCIAL 
AIR-CONDITIONING 

1250  Fifty-Third  Street 
OAKLAND  8,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  30 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February    1953 


CORMIER'S   FOUNTAIN 

3719  MacARTHUR  BLVD. 
KE.  2-9816 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


CASTELLO  GROCERY 

CHOICE  WINES  AND  BEER 
GROCERIES — FRUITS — VEGETABLES 


4738  West  Street 

OAKLAND 


Piedmont  5-2233 

CALIFORNIA 


Chinese  Dishes  Our  Specialty  KElIog  4-2063 

AL'S  CHOP  SUEY 

CHINESE  AND  AMERICAN  DISHES 

Phone  Orders  Filled 

3731  E.  14th  St.,  opp.  New  Fruitvale  Theater 

OAKLAND  CALIFOFRNIA 

Phone  KElIo?  2-8024  Nick  Christo 

New  and  Used  Oak  Barrels,  Corks,  Crocks 

J.  J.  Liquor  Store  and  Cider  Shop 

THE  DEPOT  OF  ALL  WINES 
1204  FRUITVALE  AVE. 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


ANDY'S  LIQUOR  STORE 

1300  EAST  14TH  STREET 
KE.  2-9776 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


iiay   Borgerson 

SUPERIOR  WELDING  WORKS 

Repair — Fabricating — Pipe  Welding 

I'ortable  Equipment 

C905  San  Leandro  Blvd.  LOckhaven  8-4108 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Ites.  LA.  3-9735  Bus.  HU.  3-5070 

ART   DUFFIN'S   FURNITURE   SHOP 

REFINISHING  AND  ANTIQUE  RESTORING 
4211   PIEDMONT  AVE. 

OAKLAND CALIOFRNIA 

Enterprise  Plating  &  Enameling  Co. 

PLATING  OF  ALL  KINDS 
780  W.  GRAND  AVENUE 
Phone  GLencourt   1-6606 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Pitta  and  Araujo 

I'LL  MEET  YOU  AT  THE 

KALICO  KAT 

MIXED  DRINKS— FINE  FOODS 
8701   E.   14th  Street  Phone  TRinidad  2-9750 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

CITY  FRENCH   LAUNDRY 

Specializing  Curtains — Lacecloths — Blankets 
Drapes — Bath  Mats — Chenille  Spreads 


2801   Liniden   Street 
OAKLAND 


Phone  GL.  1-8583 

CALIFORNIA 


KEIlog  2-7836 


H.  C.  James 


James  Clock  Manufacturing  Co. 

Manufacturers  of 

"JAMES  REMIND-O-CLOCK" 

5307  E.  14TH  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

J  &  J  Body  and  Paint  Shop 

Gas  Tanks  and  Radiators  Repaired 

Wrecks   Rebuilt — Free   Estimate 

i  team  cleaning,  washing  &  polishinig  under  seal 

I,0.  8-0285 — Bob's  Auto  Laundry — 7613  E.  14th 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


BERNI-LEE  FOUNTAIN 

7427  MacARTHUR  BLVD. 
LO.  8-5976 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


HIgate  4-1344 

HARRY     KAHAN 

MFG.  JEWELER 

PLATINUM  WORK  -  DIAMOND  SETTING 

477  -  15th  Street.  Room  306,  Kahn's  Lane 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


20%    increase  in  these  three  felony  of- 
fenses. 

Today,  crime  is  on  the  march  in  Amer- 
ica, and  the  tide  nuist  be  stemmed  if  we 
are  to  survive  as  a  free  people.  As  this 
point,  I  would  like  to  pause  and  pay  per- 
sonal tribute  to  a  resident  of  Chicago, 
Mr.  Virgil  W.  Peterson,  Operating  Di- 
rector of  the  Chicago  Crime  Commis- 
sion. In  his  recently  published  book, 
"Barbarians  in  Our  Midst,"  he  spells 
out  an  erudite  recitation  of  the  alliance 
of  politics,  crime,  and  vice,  and  I  com- 
mend it  to  you. 

Solutions 

This  is  probably  a  good  point  to  begin 
a  discussion  of  solutions.  In  seeking  solu- 
tions. In  seeking  answers,  there  is  always 
a  temptation  to  discuss  public  morality. 
Full  and  abiding  adherence  by  responsi- 
ble citizens  to  accepted  principles  of  mor- 
ality, as  laid  down  in  the  scriptures, 
would  vanquish  the  problem  overnight. 
Such  a  return  to  our  early  strengths  and 
virtues  would  be  the  happiest  and  quick- 
est solution.  However,  it  is  a  fact,  we 
have  become  a  confused  nation,  and  the 
path  back  is  as  difficult  as  the  course 
ahead.  Many  confuse  morality  with  le- 
gality, ^lany  have  accepted  double 
standards,  adjustable  to  private  and  busi- 
ness life.  Many  view  morality  as  a  philo- 
sophical enigma  and  pride  themselves  as 
being  "practical"  men,  convinced  that 
"good"  and  "gold"  and  "God"  are 
spelled  in  the  same  manner. 

Another  temptation  also  occurs.  It  is 
the  temptation  to  find  a  scapegoat — a  po- 
litical party  preferably — upon  which  to 
blame  the  whole  problem.  To  most  of 
us  here,  this  temptation  is  nearly  over- 
powering. However,  despite  our  inclina- 
tions, we  must  be  practical  by  realizing 
solutions  are  not  found  in  scapegoats. 
1  he  "mess,"  as  it  has  been  described,  is 
not  confined  to  one  political  philosophy, 
any  one  place,  or  any  one  level  of  gov- 
ernment. 

Professional  Level 

It  has  been  repeatedly  stated  that  law 
enforcement  is  primarily  a  local  respon- 
sibility. It  has  been  pointed  out  that 
even  though  criminals  may  be  organized 
on  a  nationwide  basis,  the  majority  of 
their  criminal  acts  involve  violation  of 
local  laws.  Therefore,  it  is  the  local  po- 
lice that  must  be  depended  upon  to  com- 
bat the  criminal  activities  of  crime  syn- 
dicates. As  we  accept  this  premise,  it 
must  be  concluded  that  between  the  law- 
abiding  elements  of  society  and  the  crim- 
inals that  prey  upon  them  stands  a  thin 
blue  line  of  defense — your  police  officer. 
It  is  upon  this  group  that  we  must  de- 
pend to  defeat  the  invasion  from  within. 
If  the  battle  is  to  be  won,  it  is  impera- 
tive that  local  police  agencies  operate  on 


DR.   ROBERT  F.  THAYER 

EXODONTIA  AND  ORAL  SURGERY 

Telephone    HIgate   4416 

301  California  Building  -  1736  Franklin  Street 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Strablewood  Quality  B.  E.  Bryan 

Strable  Hardwood  Company 

Hardwood  Lumber  -  Hardwood  Flooring  -  Panels 
Wallboards  -   Upson  Products 

First  &  Clay  Sts.— Phone  TEmplebar  5584 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


Piedmont  5-1077 


Don  Marshall,  Prop. 


Marshall   Bag  &   Barrel  Co. 

BARRELS,  DRUMS,  BURLAP,  COTTON  BAGS. 

PAPER  BAGS 

NEW  -  USED  -RECONDITIONED 

3454  HAVEN  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


DAVID   N.  ALEXANDER 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTANT 

Telephone  KEIlog  3-6767 

3124  E.  14TH  STREET 

Room  212,  Professional  Bldg. 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Piedmont  5-1497 

WILLIAM   H.  STREHLE  CO. 

Automotive  Painting  and 

Lettering  Service 

to  the  Discriminate  at 

494  THIRTY-SIXTH  STREET 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


THE  OLD  CANTEEN 

BEER — WINE — SOFT  DRINKS 
SANDWICHES 

1891   SOUTH  HIGHWAY  99 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 

111   CLUB 

MANUEL  COTTA.  Owner 

We  Serve  the  Best  in  Food  and  Mixed  Drinks 

111   WEST  INYO  STREET 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 

L.  S.  DOLLAR  STORE 

JULIUS  SALZER,  Prop. 

Clothing  and  Shoes  for  All  the  Family 

109  EAST  TULARE  STREET 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 


Monarch   Feed  &   Supply  Co. 

Hay  -  Grain  -  Seeds  -  Eggs 
Poultry  and  Stock  Feeds 


HANFORD — 403  E.  SIXTH  STREET— Phone  680 
TULARE — 95  W.  INYO  STREET — Phone  6-6780 
Phone  6-2640 

HI -DE -HO  CLUB 

SAM  and  JOSIE 
COCKTAILS  -  GOOD  FOOD  -  DANCING 

131  EAST  TULARE  STREET 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 


I- (/>riitiry   19.^3 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Paffc  31 


MEI   LING  CAFE 

ALWAYS  A  FRIENDLY  WELCOME 
Hours:   11   A.M.  to  Midnight 

189  L  STREET 
DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  686 

Tatum's  Frosty  Food  Lockers 

AND  FROZEN  FOOD  CENTER 

118  NORTH  J  STREET 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 


PELOIAN   RANCHES 

p.  O.  BOX  728 


DINUBA 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  6-5325 

BILLY'S  CLUB 

E  AND  PROSPERITY  STREETS 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 

Shop  Phone  6-6279 

SOUZA'S  GARAGE 

AUTO  AND  TRUCK  REPAIRING 
GAS  OR  DIESEL 

I  AND  INYO  STREETS 

TULARE  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  987 

DIXIE  DRIVE -INN 

We  Think  It's  Dinuba's  Finest 

Across  From  the  Firehouse 

Featuring  Borden's  Ice  Cream 

Hours  7  A.M.  til  Midnight 

493  East  Tulare  Street 
DINUBA,  CALIFORNIA 


M  A  R  C  E  I  L  '  S 

H.  G.  Bill  Brelin,  Prop. 

AMERICAN  DISHES 

STEAKS  -  CHOPS 

Cocktails    -    Mixed  Drinks 

337  West  Tulare  Street 
DINUBA,  CALIFORNIA 


a  truly  professional  level.  By  the  wonl 
professional,  I  mean  honest,  ethical,  coni- 
[letent  police  service,  conipleteh  free  of 
political  manipulation  ami  control.  We 
ha\e  enjo\e(l  the  type  of  culture  in  the 
Cit\  of  Los  Angeles  for  the  past  several 
years  that  has  enabled  us  to  act  as  a  lab- 
oratory in  testing  the  formula.  Our  offi- 
cers perform  their  daily  tasks  without 
regard  to  classes  of  persons,  secure  in  the 
realization  that  the  only  demand  upon 
them  is  the  proper  performance  of  their 
duty.  The  business  leaders  of  our  com- 
munity have  long  since  realized  counte- 
nanced vice  is  not  necessarily  an  integral 
part  of  a  large  American  city.  As  I  re- 
marked earlier,  they  realize  "the  buck 
that  goes  to  the  bookie,"  or  any  other 
criminal  activity,  does  not  go  to  business. 
Thus,  we  have  their  full  support  in  the 
suppression  of  gambling,  prostitution, 
and  the  other  facets  of  organized  crime. 

White  Spot 
The  result  has  been  nothing  less  than 
spectacular.  Today,  Los  Angeles  is  re- 
ferred to  by  authorities  as  the  nation's 
"white  spot  "  in  the  black  picture  of  na- 
tionally organized  crime.  Let  me  cite 
some  statistics  which  may  indicate  what 
professional  law  enforcement  can  accom- 
plish. ^Vhile  the  10  major  cities  report- 
ing to  the  FBI  were  experiencing  a  20 '^r 
increase  in  robberies,  burglaries,  and 
auto  thefts  since  1940,  these  crimes  have 
actually  decreased  2'~f  in  the  City  of  Los 
Angeles  during  that  same  period,  and 
this  decrease  has  been  achieved  in  spite 
of  the  phenomenal  growth  in  population 
with  all  of  the  social  dislocations  that  are 
attendant  thereto.  Since  1945,  a  period 
in  which  the  police  there  consolidated 
professional  gains,  these  selected  crime 
totals  in  Los  Angeles  decreased  37% 
while  the  ten  major  cities  experienced  a 
9  per  cent  increase.  Finally,  taking  into 
account  increases  in  population,  these 
crimes  per  100,000  residents  in  Los  An- 
geles have  been  reduced  since  1945  by 
the  astonishing  total  of  46  per  cent. 

Intelligence  Division 

Moreover,  the  twilight  zone  of  quasi 
legitimate  crime  is  not  tolerated  in  Los 
Angeles.  Recently,  a  Pacific  Coast  rep- 
resentative of  a  national  vending  ma- 
chine company — who  is  here  today — was 
contacted  by  Mafia  representatives  from 
the  Ohio  Valley.  These  criminals  had 
organized  a  California  corporation  and 
established  an  office  in  a  city  to  the  south 
of  us.  This  Pacific  Coast  representative 
was  instructed  to  meet  these  men  at  a 
certain  time,  in  a  certain  room,  of  a  cer- 
tain hotel.  When  he  demurred  on  the 
basis  he  was  accustomed  to  doing  busi- 
ness in  his  office,  he  was  told  in  no  un- 
certain terms  to  carry  out  his  instruc- 
tions, and  that  it  was  their  intention  to 


LEE'S   MARKET 

GROCERIES — MEATS — VEGETABLES 
SOFT  DRINKS — NOTIONS 

400  WEST  TULARE  STREET 
DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 


HUTCHINSON'S  DRIVE-INN 

Where  All   Your  Friends  Meet 

TRAY  SERVICE  -  RAIN  OR  SHINE 

Hours   8:00  A.M.  'Til    1:00  A.M. 


DINUBA 


208  SOUTH  J  STREET 

CALIFORNIA 


CRAIG'S  ICE  CREAM 

E.  L.  CRAIG 

Arden   Farmer's  Market 

FAIR  OAKS  &  FULTON 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S  GARDEN   SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE 

RESIDENTIAL    •    COMMERCIAL 

ROBERT  E.  HAYES 

Phone  IV.  7-2322 

4400  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TH  YS    CO. 

FOUNDRY  &  MACHINE  SHOP 

ELECTRIC  STEEL  CASTINGS 

HOP  PICKING  MACHINES 

Phone  HI.  6-3048 
6900  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TACO    HOUSE 

MEXICAN  AND  AMERICAN  FOODS 

Specializing  in 
TACOS    •    ENCHILADAS   •   TAMALES 

Orders  to  Take  Out 
HI.  5-9830 

Va  Mile  So.  Frxiitridge  Shopping  Center 

6000  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

Town  and  Country  Realty  Co. 

INSURANCE    •   F.H.A.  LOANS 
Business   Opportunities 

Phone  IV.  9-3637 

J.  E.  TELESCO — Res.  Phone  GI.  2-S727 

3231  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Ford  Tractor 


Dearborn  Farm  Equipment 


DOME  TRACTOR  COMPANY 

AND  USED   FARM  MACHINERY 

REPAIR  PARTS  AND  SERVICE 
TRACTORS  AND  FARM  IMPLEMENTS 
6200  Folsom  Blvd. — Phone:   Hlllcrest  6-8922 
Ford  Dealer — O.  E.  Saugstad,  308  Vernon  St.. 
Roseville.  Calif.    Phone  203  or  513 
Ford  Tractors  &  Used  Farm  Machinery — Wood- 
land Tractor  Co.,  West  Main,  Woodland,  Calif. 

Phone:  2-5669 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  32 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fchniary    1 953 


Clinton  N.  Collingwood 
Contractor 

Land  Leveling  •  Bulldozing 

Road  Construction 

Excavation 

IV.  9-8812 

2320  CORTEZ  LANE 

SACRAMENTO,   CALIFORNIA 


Silent  Salesmen  of 

"Sunshine  Biscuits" 

Product  of 
Loose  Wiles  Biscuit  Co. 

Sacramento  "Niks" 
Distributors 

Candy  and  Cigaret  Distributors 

Cracker  and  Biscuit 
Vending  Machines 


2621  TIOGA  WAY 
Sacramento,  California 


purchase  cigarette  \'ending  machines. 
Shortly  thereafter,  the  appointment  was 
cancelled  without  explanation.  When  he 
called  these  facts  to  my  attention,  I  was 
able  to  give  him  a  complete  explanation 
as  to  the  reason  for  the  cancellation  of 
the  appointment.  The  answer  lay  in  the 
operation  of  our  Intelligence  Division, 
which  is  charged  with  the  single  respon- 
sibility of  combatting  organized  crime. 
Jack  Lait,  in  referring  to  our  Intelli- 
gence Division  in  his  newspaper  column, 
stated:  "I  have  found  only  one  local  set- 
up that  recognizes  the  peril  of  this  situa- 
tion. In  Los  Angeles  is  the  sole  police 
agency  designed  to  combat  the  Mafia 
and  its  collateral  mobster  combinations. 
It  has  a  full  blown  intelligence  squad 
which  has  concentrated  on  this  field  for 
years,  and  has  compiled  a  file  second 
only  to  the  FBI."  Through  expert  oper- 
ation, members  of  our  Intelligence  Divi- 
sion uncovered  the  entire  plot  on  the  part 
of  these  hoodlums  to  invade  the  auto- 
matic vending  machine  industry  in  our 
area.  Subsequent  action  on  the  part  of 
our  officers  discouraged  these  predatory 
migrants  from  pursuing  their  original 
objectives. 

Achilles  Heel 

I  bring  these  facts  to  you,  not  to  seek 
praise  for  our  department,  but  to  show 
that  the  crime  picture  need  not  be  dis- 
couraging. The  gangland  menace  has  an 
"Achilles  Heel"  and  every  discerning  bus- 
inessman and  policeman  is  aware  of  it. 
Organized  crime  cannot  operate  In  the 
face  of  determined  and  honest  local  law 
enforcement. 

If  organized  crime  continues  to  oper- 
ate in  your  city,  it  does  so  because  some- 
one locally  profits  from  its  existence. 
This  is  not  to  indict  the  administration 
of  the  city  or  the  police  department.  It 
is  a  fact  that  the  average  policeman  and 
police  administrator  is  honest,  alert,  and 
devoted  to  your  welfare.  He  cannot  be 
blamed  if  he  is  forced  to  operate  under 
archaic  regulations,  political  pressure, 
and  public  apathy.  The  very  fact  that 
competent  and  honest  policemen  remain 
on  the  job  in  the  face  of  those  obstacles 
is  prima  facie  proof  of  their  deep  loyalty 
to  you,  a  loyalty  that  could  be  shaped  by 
you  into  a  potent  weapon  against  these 
enemies  within. 

However,  from  a  quarter  century  of 
police  service  under  administrations  cor- 
rupt and  honest,  weak  and  strong,  fool- 
ish and  wise,  I  say  to  you — if  organized 
crime  exists  in  your  city,  somewhere  a 
weakling,  a  fool,  and  a  despicable  traitor 
is  betraying  you  as  surely  as  if  he  were 
selling  the  key  to  our  armed  defenses. 


Landson  Electric  Co. 

Electrical  Contractor 

We  Specialize  in 

COMMERCIAL  AND 

INDUSTRIAL  WIRING 

1920  T  STREET 

Phone  HI.  7-3419 

Sacramento,  California 


PAT'S  VARIETY  STORE 

A  Fnll  Line  to  Serve  You 

A  Beautiful  Line  of  Ceramics 

5663  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

• 

Pat's    Togs    for    Children 

W^here  Mothers  Like  to  Shop 

Phone  HI.  5-6932 

5669  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

Sacramento,  California 


Bob  Bell     Allen  Bell     Larry  Bell 

CAPITAL  CITY 

LAWN   AND  GARDEN 

EQUIPMENT 

Sales  and  Service 

All  Makes  Power  and  Hand 

Mowers  Sharpened  and  Repaired 

Free  Pickup  and  Delivery 

HU  4-5549 

1101  T  Street 

SACRAMENTO,   CALIFORNIA 


BOB'S  SHELL  SERVICE 

GAS  -  OIL  -  LUBRICATION 

Phone  Gilbert  2-8734 

Fifth  and  P  Streets 

SACRAMENTO,   CALIFORNIA 


I'thninry    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Ptiffe  33 


SACRAMENTO 
READY  MIX  CO. 

Louis  Jansen,  Owner 

READY  iMIX  CONCRETE 
SATURDAY  DELIVERIES 

Phone  HU.  6-2835 

14TH  AVE.  &  POWER  INN  RD. 

Sacramento,  California 


BELL  &  BELL  CO. 

Sales  and  Service 

Power  and  Hand  Mowers 

Garden  Tractors 

Garden,  Cemetery  and 

Golf  Course  Supplies 

Featuring  SCOTT  ATWATER— 

America's  Most  Complete  Fleet 

of  Swift  Outboards 

r>l40  FAIR  OAKS  BLVD.,  Carmichael 
IVanhoe  9-0771 


925 


30TH  STREET,  Sacramento 
Gilbert  3-3312 


SULLIVAN'S 
RED  BARN 

CUSTOM  FURNITURE 
Maple  —  Cherry  —  Pine 

Our    desire    is    to    reproduce    in    your 

home  the  atmosphere  of  informal  and 

friendly  living  of  our  forefathers  .  .  . 

Gifts  for  All  Occasions 

JOAN  and  FRED  SULLIVAN 

Phone  IV.  9-9763 

3409  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO,  CALIFORNIA 


L.    D.    READER    CO. 

Installation  of 
ACOUSTICAL  CEILINGS, 
FLOOR  COVERINGS  AND 

HARDWOOD 

Noise  Takes  a  Holiday  Through 
Our  Treatments 

Phone  HI.  7-3505 
3026  V  St.,  Sacramento,  Calif. 


Political  Control 

The  first  step  then,  in  the  battle 
against  organized  crime,  is  the  freeing  of 
the  police  from  political  control.  Fol- 
lowing this,  the  next  moves  are  logical 
ami  need  little  amplification  to  business- 
men who  deal  ever\'  day  with  problems 
of  administration,  personnel,  budgeting, 
planning,  and  other  organizational  fun- 
damentals. High-standard  recruiting 
must  be  adopted.  Rotten  wood  or  dead 
wood  must  be  eliminated.  High  qualit\ 
training  must  be  instituted.  Adequate 
salaries  must  be  initiated  to  attract  and 
hold  the  qualit\-  of  men  needed. 

\Vhy  are  internal  police  affairs  of  con- 
cern to  businessmen?  There  are  three 
ver\'  good  reasons: 

1.  I  invite  this  interest  because  you 
hope  to  remain  in  business  and  escape 
control  by  criminal  combines.  Law 
enforcement  is  a  "thin  blue  line" 
which  stands  between  you  and  the  or- 
ganized forces  of  crime.  Therefore, 
your  interest  in  this  bulwark  cannot 
be  an  abstract  interest — it  is  an  ex- 
treinely  practical  matter  afifecting  you 
and  your  family's  personal  future, 
and,  as  patriots,  the  future  of  your 
nation. 

2.  I  invite  your  interest  in  police 
affairs  because  organization  and  ad- 
ministration is  "right  down  your  al- 
ley. "  If  you  operate  at  a  profit,  you 
are  demonstrating  practical  knowl- 
edge of  organizational  techniques. 
The  same  techniques  apply  to  a  police 
department.  If  the  businessmen  of  a 
community  cannot  see  and  correct  the 
faults  in  the  local  police  structure, 
then  no  one  can — the  cause  is  lost. 

3.  I  invite  your  interest  in  local 
law  enforcement  because  your  busi- 
ness will  prosper  if  it  is  effective,  or 
it  will  suffer  if  enforcement  remains 
weak.  Whether  you  like  it  or  not  you 
have  a  sizeable  financial  investment  in 
the  political  and  social  health  of  your 
community.  It  is  nothing  more  than 
sound  fiscal  policy  to  look  to  affairs 
affecting  the  soundness  of  that  invest- 
ment. 

Second  Step 

The  second  step  in  the  battle  against 
organized  crime  will  take  a  little  more 
doing.  As  you  have  seen,  the  criminal 
combines  operate  on  a  national  scale. 
Local  police  agencies  can  be  effective 
against  them,  but  only  upon  the  expendi- 
ture of  great  effort  and  sums  of  money. 

To  protect  Los  Angeles  from  this 
menace,  the  Los  Angeles  Police  Depart- 
ment has  found  it  necessary  to  know 
more  about  mobsters  in  other  cities  of 
the  nation  than  you  know  about  your 
own    business   associates.     We  maintain 


Leo's  Texaco  Service 

Lubrication    •    Accessories 
Tires    •    Batteries 

W'e  Give  S&H  Green  Statnps 


Phone  HI.  5-9576 

SACRAMENTO  BLVD.  & 
FRUITRIDGE  RD. 

Sacramento,  California 


Your  Inspection  Is  Invited 

The  Beauty  Rest  Motel 
Perry  T.  Hamilton 

Air  Conditioned  •  Heated 

On  Highways  99  &  50 

5969  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

Within  Cit)'  Limits 

Phone  HI.  5-0674 

Sacramento,  California 


Phone  IV.  9-2113 

Grady's  Bottle  Shop 

Glassware    •    Shaker  Sets 

Domestic  and  Imported  Snacks 

Hors  d'Oeuvres 

1995  FULTON  AVENUE 

In  the 

Arden  Arcade  District 

Sacramento,  California 


REGAL 

Petroleum  Corporation 
Eldon  Blankenship,  Manager 

Featuring 

PREMIUM  CLUB  CARDS 

Savings  from  Ic  to  8c  per  gal. 

Payroll  Check  Cashing 

Tel.  Hlllcrest  6-0768 

2800  BROADWAY 

Sacramento,  California 


Page  34 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1 953 


NICK  ZUPAN  Phone  GI.  2-3466 

ZUPAN   SHEET  METAL 

Gutters — Valleys — Sinks — Hoods 
Steam  Tables — Furnaces — Coolers- — Fans 

2110  FIFTH  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 


W.  F.  KIMBALL.   D.D.S. 

2431    N  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


WESTERN   MOTORS 

QUALITY  USED  CARS 
FRED  SCHULTZE 

Phone  HI.  6-6835 
2423  29th  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


24  HOUR  SERVICE 


HI.  6-6403 


Sacramento  Radio  Dispatch 
Service 

2  WAY  MOBILE  RADIO 

2518  T  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HI.  5-6763 

ANDY'S  CLEANERS 

Our  Motto 
TO  SATISFY 

2726  X  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

GAVEL  AND   FLANDERS 
CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

BUILDING  CONTRACTORS 

COMMERCIAL— RESIDENTIAL 

Office  Gilbert  2-7764 

229  W  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HOLLAND   FURNACE  COMPANY 

"World's  Largest  Installers  of  Home  Heating 
and  Air  Conditioning  Systems" 

L.  H.  JOHNSON,  Branch  Manager 

217  "O"  STREET 
Phone  HU.  4-6522 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GI.  2-9430 

DOSSMAN   BROS. 

BODY  &  FENDER— AUTO  REPAIRS 
TOWING  SERVICE  AVAILABLE 

415  O  STREET  (Rear) 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


liaison  with  indi\iduals  and  police  offi- 
cers in  every  major  city  in  the  country 
and  thus  have  built  up  files  that  threaten 
to  e.xpand  us  out  of  our  own  offices. 

Not  Local  Responsibility 

/  contend  this  natiomviJc  study  of 
criminal  syndicates  is  not  justifiahly  a 
local  responsibility ,  but  belon^^s  on  the 
federal  level.  I  am  certain  the  founders 
of  our  nation  did  not  foresee  a  day  wheii 
citizens,  criminal  and  lawful  alike,  could 
span  the  continent  in  a  few  hours  and 
travel  from  city  to  city  in  a  few  minutes. 
A  major  factor  in  the  spread  of  crime  is 
the  fact  there  is  in  e.\istence  no  federal 
agency  supplying  intelligence  on  syndi- 
cated crime  to  local  law  enforcement 
agencies.  Congressional  crime  commit- 
tees, however  useful  they  may  be  ot  Con- 
gress, do  not  fill  the  need  of  the  local 
police.  The  need  today  is  a  permanent 
agency  of  the  federal  government  dedi- 
cated to  the  continuous  study  of  syndi- 
cated crime  in  America,  and  charged 
with  the  responsibility  of  supplying  to 
local  law  enforcement  information  con- 
cerning the  identity  of  members  of  crimi- 
nal organizations  and  their  methods  of 
operation.  Otherwise,  local  law  enforce- 
ment is  not  equipped  with  the  necessary 
information  to  protect  your  communit\'. 

Previous  Recommendation 
This  recommendation  on  our  part  is 
not  new.  A  similar  recommendation  was 
made  to  the  Kefauver  Committee  on 
November  16,  1950  when,  accompanied 
bv  the  head  of  our  Intelligence  Division, 
Captain  Hamilton,  I  appeared  before  the 
committee  in  executive  session.  In  his 
report  to  the  press  following  this  session. 
Senator  Kefauver  stated :  "The  Chief 
and  Captain  Hamilton  stressed  the  neces- 
sity of  authorizing  some  federal  agency 
or  creating  some  federal  agency  for  the 
purpose  of  disseminating  information 
about  organized  criminals  and  crime  to 
the  local  enforcement  officers." 

For  the  past  two  years,  the  American 
Bar  Association  has  conducted  an  exten- 
sive study  of  syndicated  crime  in  Amer- 
ica through  its  Commission  on  Organ- 
ized Crime.  Sometime  ago,  this  Com- 
mission requested  recommendations  from 
Mayor  Bowron  of  Los  Angeles.  In  his 
reply.  Mayor  Bowron  reiterated  the 
recommendation  that  we  had  previoush' 
made  to  the  Kefauver  Committee.  The 
American  Bar  Association's  Commission 
on  Organized  Crime  is  submitting  a  re- 
port to  its  national  convention  in  San 
Francisco,  California,  this  week.  In  line 
with  Mayor  Bowron 's  recommendation, 
that  report  states  as  follows:  "Nowhere 
is  the  need  for  federal  action  to  assist 
local  law  enforcement  stressed  more  ur- 
gently   than    in    the    field    of    collecting. 


JIM   HARVEY  -  Plumbing 

HEATING— REMODELING 

"Correct  with  Copper" 

24-HOUR  SERVICE 

Phone  HI.  6-8516 
2618  U  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Superior  Pickle  Works 

"Old   Homestead"  BRAND 
PICKLES,  HORSERADISH,  PEPPERS 

Phone  GI.  2-5292 

315  T  STREET 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Industrial  Wiring  -  House  Wiring 
Electrical  Repairs  -  Commercial  Wiring 

JOHN   H.  DECKER 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  GI.  2-3526 

912  T  STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DELIVERY  SERVICE 

LESLIE  OSWALD 

EXPERT  AUTO  RADIATOR  REPAIRING 
GAS  TANK  REPAIRING 

Phone  4-2929 
1208  T  STREET   (Rear) 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Gardner  Convalescent  Home 

Phone  HI.  7-0625 
2618  X  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

ED  GLACKEN  &  SON 

PONTIAC  SPECIALIST 

General  Automotive  Repair 

Brake — Carburetor — Starter 

Generator  Service 

Motor  Tune-up 

Phone  GI.  3-3534 
Rear  1322  O  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Twenty-Fourth  &  N  Street  Market 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
WE  DELIVER 

Phone  GI.  3-9534 

2331  N  STREET 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

EVERYBODY'S  MARKET 

GROCERIES — FROZEN  FOODS 
DAIRY  PRODUCE 
BEER  AND  WINE 

Phone  GI.  2-9825 
1801    O  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


iihruary    1 953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  35 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

JOHN   I.  HAAS   INC. 

2700  PILSEN  LANE 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

T.  W.  SMITH   &  SONS 

LUMBER  AND  LOG  HAULING 

Phone  IV.  9-1032 

6045  LANDIS  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


TED'S    MARKET 

6439   FOLSOM   BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  HI.  6-2776 

BARGAIN     BILL'S 
Furniture  Warehouse 

RUGS,  LINOLEUMS, 
APPLIANCES,  ETC. 

6620  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

S.ACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


P.    J.    PISCIOTTA 

MASONRY  CONTRACTOR 

BRICK  &  STONE  WORK 
BARBECUE  PITS 

831  SAN  RAMON  WAY 
Phone  IVanhoe  9-4307 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

QUALITY  SERVICE 

Capital  Weather  Strip  Company 

MERVIN   J.   SIMMONS 

ROCKWOOL  INSULATION 

INTERLOCKING  WEATHERSTRIP 

VENETIAN  BLINDS 

IVanhoe  9-0900 
2442  MEADOWBROOK  ROAD 

SACR.AMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Hadler  Construction  Company 

GENERAL  BUILDING  CONTRACTORS 

E.  H.  HADLER.  Mgr. 

Residential   &  Commercial 
Remodeling  &  General  Construction 

Office:  56  Poplar  Blvd..  Sacramento 

Mailing:  Route  2,  Box  2250,  Rio  Linda 

HU.  6-2308 — If  no  answer  IV.  9-7813 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HARR  AND   HARR 

WHOLESALE  POULTRY 

F.4IR  OAKS 
Phones:   IV.  7-2462;  IV.  7-0417 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


coordinatiiifj,  and  (lisseminatiiifr  intornia- 
tion  about  ()r)jaiiize<i  crime." 

Third  Step 

1  he  third  step  toward  controlling  syn- 
dicated crime  demands  a  critical  evalua- 
tion of  our  system  of  laws.  The  voice  of 
the  criminal,  the  communist,  and  the 
self-appointed  tiefender  of  civil  liberties 
constantly  cries  out  for  more  and  more 
restriction  upon  police  authority.  At  the 
present  time,  I  am  the  defendant  in  a 
civil  action  designed  to  test  my  legal 
authority  to  use  the  dictograph  in  obtain- 
ing evidence  in  criminal  cases,  despite 
the  fact  that  there  is  not  one  shred  of 
evidence  that  this  authority  has  been 
abused,  and  despite  the  fact  that, 
through  the  use  of  the  dictograph,  many 
\icious  criminals  have  been  brought  to 
the  bar  of  justice  that  otherwise  would 
have  escaped  detection.  It  is  a  fact  that 
much  of  the  nefarious  business  of  the 
underworld  is  transacted  through  the 
medium  of  the  \ast  intracontinental  sys- 
tem of  telephonic  communication.  Nev- 
ertheless, the  police  are  generally  pre- 
cluded from  "listening  in"  under  pain 
of  criminal  prosecution.  The  Magna 
Carta  was  extracted  from  King  John 
on  the  plains  of  Runnymede  in  1215. 
I  here  were  no  telephones  at  that  time, 
and  do  you  believe  it  was  the  intention 
of  the  founders  of  libert\-  that  in  con- 
temporary times  we  should  provide  to 
the  criminals  who  would  destroy  us  a 
\  alu  Ri\er  sanctuary  of  telephonic  com- 
munication ?  I  do  not.  Every  attempt 
we  make  to  avail  ourselves  to  technologi- 
cal advancement  in  combatting  crime  is 
challenged  again  and  again.  The  free- 
dom of  action  of  the  individual  must 
constantly  be  restricted  in  the  interest  of 
the  welfare  of  society  as  a  whole.  An 
exaggeration  of  individual  freedom  can 
lead  to  the  destruction  of  the  freedom 
of  all.  The  police  inust  meticulously  obey 
the  law  while  the  criminal  flaunts  all 
rules  of  order.  A  heavilv  shackled  polic 
is  little  match  for  a  well  organized  and 
extensive  underworld. 

Final  Step 

V\\e  finiil  stcf  in  the  control  of  syn- 
dicated crime  would  be  a  full  recognition 
of  its  threat  by  the  parties  who  formulate 
the  nation's  policies.  I  do  not  believe 
that  either  major  political  party  has  fully 
recognized  the  threat  of  organized  crime 
to  the  vitals  of  American  freedom.  Both 
parties  give  every  evidence  of  an  alert- 
ness to  our  peril  from  the  Soviet  and 
from  the  Communist  Fifth  Column.  But 
I  have  not  perceived  a  firm  grasp  of  the 
fact  that  our  national  life  is  dependent 
upon  order,  and  that  order  is  dependent 
upon  the  impartial  enforcement  of  our 
laws.  There  must  be  a  common  appre- 
ciation that  our  nation  and  its  defenses 


DRIVE    SAFELY 
The  Life  You  Sawe 
May  Be  Your  Own 


Office:    Hlllcrest  6-6983 


P.  O.  Box  2188 


PRODUCERS  SEED  COMPANY 

FLORIN  ROAD  Between 
STOCKTON  BLVD.  &  FRANKLIN  BLVD. 
Producers  Seed  Company  warrants  to  extent  of 
purchase  price  that  seeds  sold  are  as  described 
on  the  container  within  recognized  tolerances. 
Seller  gives  no  other  or  further  warranty,  ex- 
pressed  or   implied, 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


FLORIN   FOOD   DEPOT 

WALTER  J.  BUCKLEY 
QUAUTY  GROCERIES  &  MEATS 

Business   Phone   H.  5-3907 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


SOUTH  SACRAMENTO  JUNK  CO. 

A.  WARING 

Phone  HI.  5-9068 

47TH  AVENUE  &  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 


SACRAMENTO 


2  Blocks  East 


CALIFORNIA 


SPARKY'S   FOUNTAIN   &  LUNCH 

BREAKFAST.  LUNCH  AND  DINNERS 
Hours:  8  A.M.  to  9  P.M. 

Phone  IV.  9-3716 
2464  AVALON  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  HI.  6-7441 


Phone  IV.  9-9424 


CAMPBELL   DECORATORS 

PAINTING   •   DECORATING 

COMMERCIAL    •    RESIDENTIAL 

Finest  Workmanship  and  Materials 

"For  People  Who  Care" 

WM.   R.  CAMPBELL 

5614  McADOO  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


MITCHUM  TULLY  &  CO. 

INVESTMENT  SECURITIES 
San  Francisco    •    Los  Angeles 

926  JAY   BUILDING 
GI.  3-1765 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Arden  District   Farmers  Market 

RAYS  APPLIANCES 

TONY   RAY,  Owner 

Whirlpool  Washers  and  Dryers 

Hotpoint    •   Maytag   •   Philco 

Radio  and  Television  Sales  and  Service 

Ivanhoe  9-9635 

FAIR  OAKS  BLVD.  &  FULTON  AVE. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  36 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1953 


CLARENCE 
Res.  HI.  6-9196 


KENNY 
Res.  HI.  6-4809 


BOWERS    BROS. 

GENERAL  TRUCKING 

Bus.  HL  7-3627 
4490  -  6STH  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

E.  F.  KUHN  Dial  HI.  5-6634 

SUTTER    NURSERY 

TREES   •   PLANTS   •   SHRUBS 

BEDDING  PLANTS  OUR  SPECIALTY 

Visit  Our  Booth  Every  Saturday  at  Fanners 

Free  Market,  Alhambra  Blvd.  and  S  St. 

5500  -  34TH  STREET 

1   Block  East  of  Franklin  Blvd. 

on  Fruitridge  Road 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


E  R  M  A    RAY 
Fountain  -  Lunch 

GOOD  HAMBURGERS   •  THICK  SHAKES 

COLD  BEER    •   SOFT  DRINKS 

GAS  &  OIL 

Phone  HI.  5-9928 
STOCKTON  BLVD.  AT  FLORIN  RD. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

W.  S.  MARKS  BONING  PLANT 

Phone  HI.  6-9677 

FLORIN  ROAD 
Rout?  1,  Box  3361 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

CLARK'S  WELDING  WORKS 

ELECTRIC    •   ACETYLENE 

Contractor's,  Loggers*  and  Industrial  Equipment 

Specializing  in 

Building,  Repairing  and  Rebuilding 

Hlllcrest  5-2714 Res.  HI.  6-8434 

FOLSOM  BLVD.  AT  PERKINS 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

WHITTINGS  PLANING  MILLS 

CUSTOM  MILLING 
RESAWING  AND  GRADING 

Phone  HI.  7-4731 
SAN  JOAQUIN  AT  REDDING 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


VERN  CALLISON'S 
Cocktail  Lounge 

FULTON  «<  MARCONI 

Phone  IV.  9-9868 

2878  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


rest  on  virtue  and  morality,  not  in 
Washington  alone,  but  in  every  city  and 
hamlet  across  this  land. 

It  has  been  a  pleasure  as  well  as  an 
honor  to  be  invited  here  today  to  address 
you.  I  trust  you  will  not  view  these  re- 
marks as  just  a  tirade  by  a  policeman 
against  the  enemies  of  society.  We  need 
not  be  philosophers  or  historians  to  see  a 
menace  and  to  squarely  face  it.  You  have 
seen  how  crime  can  engulf  a  nation  and 
destroy  its  freedom ;  how  it  is  conceiv- 
able the  underworld  has  risen  and  may 
rise  further  in  positions  of  political  in- 
fluence to  where  important  officeholders 
will  be  mere  puppets,  executing  the  will 
of  their  criminal  overlords.  We  expend 
vast  resources  in  fighting  foreign  enemies. 
Let  us  not  be  blind  to  the  internal  dan- 
gers which  can  destroy  us  as  quickly  and 
as  certainly.  The  day  has  come  when,  in 
the  preservation  of  our  freedom,  the  law 
abiding  people  of  this  nation  and  the 
police  who  serve  them  must  join  hands 
together  in  a  relentless  war  upon  the  in- 
vasion from  within. 

It  is  the  patriotic  thing  to  do,  and  in 
closing  let  me  leave  with  you  my  defini- 
tion of  patriotism.  True  patriotism  is  an 
abiding  conviction  in  the  heart  and  mind 
of  man  that,  to  the  nation  that  nurtured 
him,  he  owes  an  eternal  debt  of  grati- 
tude, and,  in  the  payment  of  that  debt, 
he  will  do  anything  that  is  necessary  even 
though  it  be  that  he  shall  lav  down  his 
life. 


GASOLINE  TAX  DEDUCTIBLE 

(Continued  from  page  7 ) 

The  above  personal  deductions  includ- 
ing the  gasoline  tax  are  available  only  if 
the  standard  deduction  is  not  used. 

In  computing  adjusted  gross  incomes, 
motorists  are  entitled  to  deduct  all  main- 
tenance, depreciation  and  insurance  costs 
for  vehicles  used  entirely  for  business. 
When  cars  are  used  for  both  business 
and  pleasure,  a  proportionate  portion  of 
these  expenses,  based  on  business  use 
only,  may  be  allowed. 

Not  deductible  are  such  pleasure  driv- 
ing items  as  insurance,  finance  charges 
on  conditional  sales  contracts,  traffic 
fines,  and  Federal  excise  taxes  on  tires, 
tubes,  oil  and  accessories. 

Phone  27-R-I2 


LEMON   HILL  NURSERY 

GROWER-PLANTS.  SHRUBS  &  TREES 

Wholesale — Retail 

Dial   HI.  6-8592 

Rt.  4,  Box  3970 

One  Half  Mile  South  of  City  Limit 

On  Stockton  Blvd. — 1    Block  East 

Lemon   Hill  Avenue 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


DUNBAR'S    MARKET 

A  COMPLETE  DRIVE-IN  MARKET 

7720  FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

IVanhoe  9-6141 

THE  TEXAS  COMPANY 

TEXACO  PETROLEUM  PRODUCTS 

Producing  Department,  Pacific  Coast  Division 

J.   P.   REYNOLDS.   Lands  and  Leases 

2849  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

REAL  ESTATE  • 


INSURANCE 


CAVANAUGH    &    CO. 

Bus.  IVanhoe  9-7676 
2612  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


THE    PATIO 

PATIO  FURNITURE    •   FIRE  WOOD 

FENCING 

MISCELLANEOUS  GARDEN 

CONSTRUCTION  MATERIALS 

Phone  IV.  9-6161 
2419  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


THE  APPLIANCE  MART 

2131   FULTON  AVENUE 
Town  &  Country  District 

PHILCO  AND  MOTOROLA  TELEVISION 
Phone  IV.  9-7566 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


C.    S.    GRACEY 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTOR 

RESIDENTIAL— COMMERCIAL 

IVanhoe  9-2922 
611    FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HOME  LUMBER  CO. 

NEW  &  USED  BUILDING  MATERIALS 

Phone  HU.  6-1282 

RT.  4.  BOX  3I54F 

Corner  of  Franklin  and  Power  Inn  Road 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CARR'S  CASH   STORE 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  O.  G.  Carr 

GROCERIES  -  REFRESHMENTS  -  DRUGS 

AND  NOTIONS  -  SPORTING  GOODS 

FISHING  TACKLE  -  HARDWARE 


POLLOCK  PINES 


CALIFORNIA 


CALIFORNIA  OXYGEN  CO. 

OXYGEN  -  ACETYLENE  -  NITROGEN 

CARBON  DIOXIDE 
WELDING  APPARATUS  &  SUPPLIES 

Phone  GI.  2-3093 
1215  -  18TH  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


/',  lirtiary   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Paze  37 


Phone  IV.  9-0388 

BOB    RONNE 

BUILDING  CONTRACTOR 

■•Be  Sure  Ifs  RONNE  Built" 

ROBERT  L.  RONNE 
1514  LA  SIERRA  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


GOLDEN  CHALICE 


LeCROIX   CHAMPAGNE 


MILLER   DISTRIBUTING  CO. 

WHOLESALE  WINES  AND  CHAMPAGNE 

HARR^'   MILLER 

Warehouse  HU.  4-7875 

Office  IV.  7-055S 

2010  O  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CARL  L.   HECKES 

BUILDER 

IVanhoe  9-3531 
835  EL  CHORRO  WAY 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

IVanhoe  9-3078 

J.    F.    M  AREK 

PLUMBING  CONTRACTOR 
35  Years  Construction  Experience 

2345  GRANITE  WAY 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Bonded   Patrol  &   Investigation 
Service 

JOHN   LANDGRAF 

PRIVATE   INVESTIG.ATIONS 
DOMESTIC  &  CO.MMERCIAL 

Phone  IV.  9-6308 

2312   LLOYD  LANE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  IV.  9-0546 

JACK  ANDERSON   Landscaping 

Personalized  Landscaping  to  Fit 
Your  Every  Need 

Free  Estimates    •   Guaranteed  Work 

1061   FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

EASTMAN   &   BRADFORD 

MOBIL  GAS  STATION 

TRAILER  RENTALS 

GAS    •   OIL    •    LUBRICATION 

TIRE  AND  BATTERY  SERVICE 

Phone  IV.  9-8984 
1901   FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


R.  E.  JOHNSON   D.D.S. 

2830  MARCONI  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


MIDNIGHT  MANHUNT 

(('.(inlinued  from  page  5) 

Streets,  the  scene  of  the  Irish  robbery, 
the  (kio  moved  east  and  south  toward 
fashionable  Nob  Hill. 

As  the  bandit  car  roared  eastward. 
Chief  of  l^olice  Daniel  J.  O'Brien  was 
in  the  act  of  saying  goodbve  to  a  ^roup 
of  friends  with  whom  he  had  just  had 
dinner  in  the  swank  Fairmont  Hotel. 
With  Detective  Sergeant  James  Neely 
he  starred  across  the  street  toward  his 
car.  A  twin  explosion  sounded  a  short 
distance  away. 

O'Brien  paused  tensely.  "That  was 
gunfire,  "  he  told  Neely. 

As  he  spoke  a  blue  sedan  careened  over 
the  crest  of  the  hill  and  bore  down  on 
the  chief  and  his  driver  at  breakneck 
speed.  As  one  man  the  Chief  and  Neeh 
drew  their  service  revolvers  and  signaled 
the  car  to  stop. 

The  defiant  roar  of  two  guns  was  their 
replv  as  the  speeding  bandits  sent  heavy 
caliber  bullets  crashing  past  the  two  po- 
licemen into  the  Chief's  car. 

While  Chief  O'Brien  sent  bullet  after 
bullet  winging  after  the  fleeing  bandits, 
Neely  started  the  big  car  and,  with  the 
city's  ranking  police  officer  at  his  side, 
sent  it  hurtling  down  the  steep  Powell 
Street  hill  on  the  trail  of  the  blue  sedan. 
They  were  never  able  to  lessen  the  fugi- 
tives' lead,  however,  and  after  a  wild 
chase  lost  them  in  a  sudden  flurr\  of 
traffic. 

Angril}'  the  Chief  stopped  at  the  near- 
est call  box.  Captain  of  Detectives  Dun- 
can Mathesen,  who  had  been  called  by 
Heal\-  to  take  charge  of  the  case,  an- 
swered. 

"Two  pvniks  just  took  a  shot  at  me  on 
Powell  Street,"  the  indignant  Chief  re- 
ported. "rhe\'  were  in  a  blue  sedan, 
license  number  766-954  I  want  every 
man  in  the  department  to  be  on  the  look- 
out for  that  car  Get  those  men  before 
they  kill  somebody." 

"They  already  have.  Chief,"  Alathe- 
sen  reported.  "Those  shots  you  heard 
killed  a  man !" 

l^ack  at  the  corner  of  Clay  and  Pow- 
ell, police  photographers  were  taking  pic- 
tures of  the  remains  of  Mario  Pagano, 
an  elderly  Italian. 

"He  didn't  do  anything,  "  a  witness 
told  Detective  McGreevy,  who  had  re- 
sponded to  the  call.  "He  was  just  cross- 
ing the  street  when  those  guys  came  up 
Cla\'  Street  and  took  the  corner  on  two 
wheels.  The\'  missed  the  old  man  by  the 
skin  of  his  teeth.   Of  course  he  was  sore. 

"He  waved  his  umbrella  at  them  and 
swore  a  little  in  Italian.  They  stopped. 
They  didn't  say  a  word.  Just  pulled 
their  guns  and  let  him  have  it.    Both  at 


Highway    50 


Telephoe    HI.    7-9000 


LA  SIERRA  MOTEL 

MR.  AND  MRS.  FRED  CLARK,  Owners 
NONE   BETTER  IN  CALIFORNIA 

ROUTE  2,  BOX  2551 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

L.    E.    LUCKE 

CEMENT  CONTRACTOR 

Estimates  Given  Free 

•FOR  THE  BEST  CALL  LUCKY'^ 

Hlllcrest  5-4512 

5920  SUTTER  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

The  Great  Lakes  Tractor  Co. 

WEST  COAST  BRANCH 

STOCKTON  BLVD.  &  LEMON  HILL 

HI.  7-6684 

T.  AINSWORTH— RES.  Phone  HI.  7-8919 

RES.  2990  61  ST  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

SCENIC    LANDSCAPING    SERVICE 

NORMAN   N.   KO'l'AMA   -HI.    7-4822 

••LANDSCAPE  THE  SCENIC  WAY" 

LANDSCAPING    •    GARDENING 

Free  Estimates 

1641    FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


M    ST.    LAUNDRY 

3-DAy  SERVICE 

Dial   HI.  5-4075 
3175  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

MANUEL   H.   SPENCHIAN 

CUTTER  AND  DESIGNER 
OF  MEN'S  FINE  CLOTHING 

1004  O  STREET 
Phone  GI.  2-9448 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

S  &  H  GREEN  STAMPS 

FOSSUM'S  UNION   SERVICE 

UNION  OIL  DEALER 

3109  BROADWAY 
Phone  HI.  5-9614 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFFORNIA 

KRUEGER'S  MARKET 

Groceries — Lunch  Meats — Vegetables 
Beverages 

Phone  HI.  5-6760 

2620  T  STREET 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFOFRNIA 


Page  38 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fehrunry   1953 


"Let's  Get  Associated" 

BENNETT  &   MULLENIX 
Asioc'iaied   Service 

FREE  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 

Phone:  HI.  6-1915 

FOLSOM  BLVD.  AT  57TH  ST. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

C.  K.  RANDAL  TRUCKING 

STATE-WIDE  TRUCKING 
HAULERS  OF  BUILDING  MATERIALS 

1560  South  Gerhart,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Phone  UNion  8-1221 

5520  STOCKTON  BLVD — Phone  HI.  7-5667 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Hlllcrest  5-0221 

LINDY'S  DEPARTMENT  STORE 

DRY  GOODS  •  NOTIONS   •  HARDWARE 

•■WE  GIVE  CASH  CHECKS" 

3257  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

14TH   AVENUE  GROCERY 

MEATS   •   GROCERIES    •    VEGETABLES 

TEXACO  GASOUNE 

FIRESTONE  TIRES,  TUBES   •  ACCESSORIES 

YOUR  CREDIT  IS  GOOD 

Phone  HI.  5-9418 

6500  14TH  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


FEY'S 
in  Arden  Town 

HARDWARE   •   SPORTING  GOODS 
APPLIANCES    •    TELEVISION 

Phone  IV.  9-1377 
555  LA  SIERRA  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CROWDER  &  SON 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

IVanhoe  9-6667 
820  EL  CHORRO  WAY 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Trouble  Shooting  Ph.  IV.  9-1384 

L.    W.    SCOTT 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTOR 
Residential    •    Commercial 

2521    DUARTE  COURT 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HAGGETT'S  DRAFTING  SERVICE 

Drawings  for  F.H.A..  G.I.  &  Bank  Loans 

Residence 

Multiple  Units  &  Speculation    •    Insurance 

IV.  9-3967 

3566  BODEGA  COURT 

Arden   Park 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


the  same  time.    He  never  had  a  chance. 
"Heforc  anybody  could  move  they  had 
started  again  and  were  racing  up  Powell 
Street. 

"I  caught  the  license  number.  It  was 
766-954." 

At  police  headquarters  Captain  IVIath- 
esen  outlined  the  night's  activities  to 
Chief  O'Brien,  starting  with  the  Bia- 
ginni  murder  and  ending  with  the  sense- 
less slaying  of  Pagano.  ^Vhile  he  was 
speaking  a  telephone  call  was  received 
from  Northern  station. 

"We've  got  the  blue  sedan !  It  was 
abandoned  on  Haight  Street  between 
Octavia  and  Laguna." 

Chief  O'Brien  swung  into  action  "Get 
Dullea  up  to  that  car,"  he  ordered  "He 
night  find  something  valuable.  In  the 
meantime  we're  going  to  go  over  this  city 
with  a  fine  tooth  comb.  Divide  the  dis- 
tricts into  zones.  Pick  up  every  suspicious 
character.  Don't  miss  a  trick  or  a  place. 
If  we  don't  get  these  killers  two  murders 
will  be  a  drop  in  the  bucket." 

Physicians  and  surgeons  were  warned 
to  watch  for  a  wounded  man  when  Dul- 
lea, examining  the  blue  sedan,  found 
blood  on  the  right  door  and  floor  of  the 
car. 

"One  of  them  was  hit,"  he  reported. 
"He'll  need  medical  attention." 

A  careful  search  of  the  car  revealed 
several  bullet  holes,  a  few  fingerprints, 
all  too  smudged  to  be  of  any  use,  and 
Dr.  Jacobs'  watch  and  wallet  on  the  rear 
seat. 

By  the  time  the  blue  sedan  was  recov- 
ered morning  newspapers  had  been  in- 
formed of  the  crime  orgy  and  were  hit- 
ting the  streets  with  extras  telling  of 
what  they  referred  to  as  the  "Terror 
Bandits."  American  Legion  posts  of- 
fered assistance  to  Chief  O'Brien  and 
many  private  citizens  appeared  at  the 
Hall  of  Justice  on  the  morning  of  Oc- 
tober 10,  offering  assistance.  By  noon 
scenes  resembling  the  old  days  of  the 
vigilantes  were  reenacted  in  San  Fran- 
cisco, with  citizens'  committees  being 
formed  to  help  police  combat  the  bandit 
duo. 

Although  dozens  of  suspicious  charac- 
ters were  rounded  up  and  questioned,  and 
the  search  penetrated  into  every  imagin- 
able corner  of  the  city,  Sunday's  search 
revealed  nothing.  That  evening  the 
streets  were  cleared  while  the  city  waited 
apprehensively  for  the  bandits  to  strike 
again.  Contrary  to  expectations,  how- 
ever, the  police  department  enjoyed  a 
Muiet  evening.  Crime  was  limited  to 
||if  petty  theft.  By  Monday,  October  11,  the 
Bcitv  relaxed  a  little,  although  the  police, 
ed  by  O'Brien,  Mathesen,  Dullea,  and 
iMcDonald,  pressed  their  search  vigor- 
lously. 


Phone  GI.  2-6310 

THE   BATTERY  SHOP 

Distributors  of 

POWER  PLUS  BATTERIES 

REPAIRING — REBUILDING— ANY  MAKE 

1223   BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Gilbert  2-5206 


1631    O  STREET 


PAUL  NELSON   REALTY  CO. 

RENTALS — INSURANCE— LOANS 
BONDS — NOTARY 

AUSTIN  CONE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GI.  2-6687 

MANUEL  N.  PACHECO 

FURNITURE  REFINISHING  AND  REPAIRING 

Antiques  and  Pianos  a  Specialty 

310  "W"  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GI.  2-9405 

VICTOR  GROCERY 

YOSHIO  SHIBATA 

400  T  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  IV.  7-1414 

COTTAGE  MOTEL 

DAVID  FAIRLEY.  Owner-Manager 

AIR  COOLED  PANELRAY  HEAT 

MODERATE  RATES 

Near  Town  &  Country  Shopping  Center 

HIGHWAYS  99E  &  40 

2350  AUBURN  BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFOFRNIA 

■TAKE-E-HOME" 

FINE  CHINESE  FOOD 
TO  TAKE  OUT  and  DELIVERY 

IVanhoe  9-6381 
2853  FULTON  AVE.  at  MARCONI  AVE. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Norm's  Burger  Broiler 

Specializing  in 

BROILED  HAMBURGER 

and  STEAKS 

Phone  IV.  9-8638 

2874  FULTON  AVENUE 

Sacramento,  California 


February  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  39 


ANNOUNCING 

THE  SQUARE  DEAL  ROOFING  CO. 

ALL  TYPES  OF  ROOFS 

ASBESTOS  SIDING 
Your  Friendly  Roofing  Service 

HU.  6-4462 
6037  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HI.  9-9S58 

JOHNNIE'S  MOBIL  SERVICE 

GAS    •   OIL   •   LUBRICATION 
MOTOR  TUNEUPS 

STOCKTON  BOULEVARD  and 
FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF  A  FRIEND 

DRIVE    CAREFULLY 
The  Life  You  Save 
May  fie  Tour  Own 


McCRACKEN  TRUCKING  SERVICE 

STATEWIDE  HAULING 
LUMBER   •   CARGO  INSURED 

Phone  IV.  9-2776 
3251   POTTER  LANE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


BY  COURTESY 

EDISON  APARTMENTS 

I    and  2-Bedrooni  Apartments 

IV.  9-8533 
EDISON  &  BELL  STREETS 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

E.  E.  "ED"  SCOTT 

Sales  Representative 
REVLON  CORPORATION  OF  CALIFORNIA 

2305  PARK  ESTATES  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


OREN  GENTRY 
IV.  9-9781 


VERN  GENTRY 
HU.  6-5712 


GENTRY    BROS. 

CONCRETE  CONTRACTORS 

FREE  ESTIMATES 

2481   VALLEY  ROAD 
SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  WA.  5-5235 
Don't  Let  Your  Business  FLY  Away  From  You 

JOHN   G.  TRIPLETT  CO. 

DISTRIBUTOR 
AUTOMATIC  INSECT  CONTROL  UNITS 

JOHN  C.  TRIPLETT 

2201    JULIESSE   AVENUE 
SACRAMENO  CALIFORNIA 


At  6  p.m.  Monday  an  e.xcited  cab 
ilriser  called  the  detecti\e  bureau.  "I  just 
refuseil  a  ride  to  two  men  at  29th  and 
Mission  Streets.  Another  driver,  Walter 
Svvanson,  picked  them  up.  One  of  them 
answered  the  description  of  the  black 
haired  "Terror  Bandit." 

\\liile  Mission  station  police  ques- 
tioneil  the  cab  driver,  Walter  Samson 
drove  his  fares  along  I6th  Street  into 
the  unlighted  gloom  of  the  Southern  Pa- 
cific railroad  yards  and  over  the  viaduct 
that  crosses  the  tracks.  The  two  young 
men  ordered  him  to  stop  on  the  other 
side. 

"W'e've  got  a  bottle  here,  how  about 
a  drink?"  one  of  them  otiered. 

Swanson  got  out  of  the  cab  and  came 
around  to  the  rear.  His  job  as  a  cab 
driver  was  an  avocation.  He  had  sold 
insurance  all  day  and  was  tired.  One  of 
the  men  was  holding  a  Hask  temptingly. 
He  opened  the  door. 

"Put  up  your  hands  and  keep  quiet!" 

The  flask  was  replaced  by  a  heavy  cali- 
ber re\ohcr.  1  he  friendly  fare  was 
snarling  orders.  Violence  and  hate  were 
mirrored  in  his  features.  His  voice  was 
like  the  growl  of  a  mad  dog. 

"Get  over  there."  He  indicated  the 
deep  shadows  at  the  edge  of  the  viaduct. 
Swanson  followed  his  orders  implicith'. 
1  00  late  he  recognized  the  black  haired 
young  man  the  newspapers  had  described 
as  one  of  the  Terror  Bandits.  It  was  his 
companion  who  had  fooled  him.  One  of 
the  Terror  Bandits  had  been  described  as 
heavy  boned  with  close  set  eyes.  This 
man's  companion  was  slim,  with  delicate 
Latin  features. 

1  he  cab  driver  stood  in  frozen  silence 
while  the  gunman's  young  companion  re- 
moved his  cap  and  badge.  Waiting  for 
him  at  home  were  his  wife  and  eight 
weeks  old  son.  He  was  aware  that  his 
life  was  more  important  to  them  than  the 
few  dollars  these  men  might  get.  The 
black  haired  man  was  lifting  his  gun. 

Swanson  steeled  himself  for  the  blow 
in  the  face  he  was  sure  would  come,  re- 
membering the  pattern  set  by  the  fiendish 
crimes  of  the  preceding  Saturday  night. 

Flame  leaped  from  the  muzzle  of  the 
revolver  and  blood  gushed  from  the  cab 
driver's  face.  He  was  dead  before  he  hit 
the  pavement. 

J  he  black  haired  bandit  motioned  to 
his  younger  companion. 

"Put  on  that  hat.  Now  we'll  really  go 
to  work.  " 

The  two  yoving  men  entered  the  cab 
and  sped  away,  leaving  Swanson's  body 
alone  in  the  darkness  behind  them.  A 
few  blocks  away  they  pulled  up  beside 
Michael   Petrovich  as  he  walked  along 


GE-RHART'S  MARKET 

In  Arden   District   Farmers'  Market 
COMPLETE  HOME  FREEZER  and 

LOCKER  SERVICE 

Featuring  Nothing  but  the  Finest 

Quality  in  Meats 

Phone  IV.  9-9434 

Don't  for^iet  to  visit  our  Town  &  Country 

Village  Lockers 

541    MONROE — Fair  Oaks  Blvd.  &  Fulton  Ave. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone  HI.  5-9842 


HILLTOP    CAFE 

BEER   •   WINE   •   LIQUOR 

5040  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Sacramento    Building    Specialties 

PLUMBING  SUPPLIES    •    FINISHED   LUMBER 
BUILDERS  HARDWARE   •    LUMBER 
HARDWARE   •   ELECTRIC  SUPPLIES 

Phone  HI.  7-7558 
4947  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

OLD   MACDONALD'S   FARM 

A  25-Acre  Playground 

Specializing  in  .  .  . 

CHICKEN  DINNERS  $1.50 

CHILD'S  PLATE   .80 

Come  as  You  Are  and  Relax  in  the  Big  Red  Bam 

Open  Tuesday  thru  Friday.  5  p.m.  till  9  p.m. 

Saturay  and  Sunday,  1   p.m.  till  9  p.m. 

JEAN  and  AL--HI.    5-9033 
3'/i;  Miles  from  Perkins  on  the  Jackson  Road 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


"Ma 


Be 


IVanhoe   7-2361 


BEAVERS  TRANSPORTATION 

GENERAL  TRUCKING 

Route  6,  Box  3176 
AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  IVanhoe  9-2326 

Pacific  Coast  insulation  Co. 

M.  L.  FRYE.  Owner 

Licensed  and   Insured  Contractor 

Paico  Wool  Distributors  and  Applicators 

HOUSE  AND  COLD  STORAGE 

Rt.  7.   Box    1390 

AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Pine  Line  Construction 

ROYSE  &   DEVRIEND 

CONTRACTORS 

TRENCHING   •   SEWER   •   WATER 

HU.  6-1094 

5945  EASTERN  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


A.   CAPASSO 


J.   A.   CAPASSO 


A  &  J  CITRUS  DISTRIBUTORS 

Phone  Hlllcrest   7-9775 

5505    FOLSOM    BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  40 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


/•■(/;; 


795-1 


COZY  COTTAGES 

WEEKLY  AND  MONTHLY  RENTALS 

FAMILY  COURT  FOR 
FAMILY  PEOPLE 

IV.  7-0264 
5111   AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


NEUFFER  ELECTRIC 

CLIFF  NEUFFER 

Power  WIRING  Lights 

FREE  ESTIMATES 

Dial  WA.  5-0402 
1647  DIGGS  PARK  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  WA.  5-8545 

MOTOR  PARTS  SALES 

JOE   LANPHIER 
AUTO  PARTS   •    ACCESSORIES  &  EQUIPMENT 

110  LINDEN  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


BOB'S  HANDYMAN   SERVICE 

PAINTING    •    GENERAL  REPAIRING 
No  Job  Too  Small 

-hone  WA.  5-0487 
2645  -  17TH  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HEARTY  &  GANNON 

BUILDERS 

Developers  of 

McCLELLAN  MEADOWS    •    GARY  GARDENS 

Phones  IV.  9-7313  and  IV.  9-8310 
3625  DON  JULIO  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Hlllcrest  5-8847 

FRUITRIDGE  BEAUTY  SHOP 

ANN    LUTJEMEIER 

We  Specialize  in 

Hair  Styling  "  Hair  Tinting  &  Permanent  Waving 

Manicuring 

Fruitridge  Shopping  Center 

5430  FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HECKES  &  HURST 

REALTORS 

HOME  DEVELOPMENT    •   SUBDIVIDERS 
INSURANCE 

Phone  HU.  1-30S1 

801   NINTH  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


ARDEN   PHARMACY 

R.  B.  HAMILTON,  Ph.  G. 

Phone  IV.  9-1486 

520  LA  SIERRA  DRIVE 

(Arden  Town) 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Mariposa  Street  toward  his  home  on  San 
Bruno  Avenue. 

"Have  you  got  the  time?" 

Petrovich  fumbled  for  his  watch.  'Ihe 
chain  caught  in  a  belt  loop  and  he  paused 
to  untangle  it.  The  heavy  crash  of  the 
revolver  ended  his  attempt.  Michael 
Petrovich  never  had  time  to  realize  he 
had  encountered  the  "Terror  Bandits." 
Horrified  onlookers  called  police  while 
the  cab  disappeared  down  Mariposa 
Street. 

Captain  Mathesen  himself  took  the 
report  of  Petrovich's  murder.  He  dis- 
patched Detectives  McGreevy,  Dorman, 
George  Page,  and  Frank  Jackson  to  the 
scene.  The  four  policemen,  all  armed 
with  shotguns,  converged  on  the  scene 
simultaneously  from  four  directions,  but 
the  killers  eluded  their  trap.  The  found 
a  terrified  crowd  gathered  around  the 
slain  man's  body. 

"What  happened?" 

"I  can't  figure  it  out,"  a  witness  an- 
swered. "They  asked  him  what  time  it 
was.  Then  they  shot  him.  He  never 
even  got  his  watc'-i  out." 

"They  said  he  was  too  slow,"  a  second 
witness  added. 

Back  at  headquarters  Captain  Mathe- 
sen was  talking  to  an  agitated  motorist 
on  the  telephone. 

"I  was  driving  along  Sixteenth  Street 
by  the  viaduct,"  the  man  said,  "when  my 
lights  picked  out  something  lying  near 
the  street.  ^Vhen  I  iiwestigated  it  turned 
out  to  be  a  man's  body.  Somebody  shot 
him  in  the  face." 

Mathesen  called  Potrero  station  and 
detailed  Officer  Harry  Doyle  to  stand 
guard  over  the  dead  cab  driver's  body. 
Then  he  called  Chief  O'Brien. 

"They're  out  again,"  he  informed  him. 
"Two  men  are  dead  already." 

'The  Chief  hurried  downtown  to  take 
charge  of  the  man  hunt  himself.  Every 
available  officer  was  called  back  to  duty. 
But  while  hundreds  of  policemen  pa- 
trolled the  streets  in  their  own  cars  or 
those  donated  by  private  citizens  the  ban- 
dits struck  repeatedly  and  with  the  same 
maddening  inconsistency  as  before. 

They  stopped  at  Frank  Mana's  soft 
drink  parlor  at  17th  and  Mississippi 
Streets,  asked  him  to  change  a  $20  bill, 
then  held  him  up.  At  a  Seventh  and 
Brannan  Street  restaurant  they  held  up 
Louis  Ferrando,  the  cook.  Ferrando,  see- 
ing the  gun,  laughed. 

"You're  kidding." 

By  the  time  he  discovered  they  were 
not  kidding  he  had  received  a  bullet 
through  the  neck  and  was  lying  helplessly 
on  the  floor  while  the  younger  of  the  two 
gunmen  rifled  the  cash  register. 

Half  a  block  away  the  killers  drove 
into  a  service  station  operated  by  C.  AV. 


MAC'S  VARIETY  STORE 

YARD  GOODS   •   TOYS 

ALL  YOUR  NEEDS 

Phone  HU.  6-0332 
5614  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


RAY'S  r;]ORWALK  SERVICE 

MOTOR  TUNEUP  AND  BRAKE  SERVICE 

Phone  IV.  7-2766 

ACROSS  FROM  McCLELLAN  FIELD 

Route  6,  Box  1801 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA, 

HARRINGTON'S 
EMERGENCY  ROAD  SERVICE 

Serving  the  Grea.ter  North  Area 

National  Automobile  Club  Service 

24-Hour  Towing 

IVanhoe  9-0829 
2931  BRYCE  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


P.    S.    DYER 

REAL  ESTATE    •    LOANS 
AND  INSURANCE 


Phone  IV.  9-3175 
1921   FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

CONTRACTORS  SAW  SERVICE 

R.  L.  MAINVILLE 

ALL  KINDS  OF  SAWS  RECONDITIONED 

Satisfaction  Guaranteed 

WA.  5-3101 

1422  AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

Auburn  Boulevard  at  East  El  Camino 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


ROY  NASH   SHELL  SERVICE 

FREE  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY 

WASHING,  POLISHING  &  LUBRICATION 

We  Give  S&H  Green  Stamps,  Double  on  Mondays 

Phone  HI.  5-9450 
POWER  INN  &  FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CORNER     MARKET 

PHIL  JORDAN,  Owner 
MEATS  -  GROCERIES  -  BEER  AND  WINE 

Phone  GI.  2-9953 
1700  V  STREET 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


RANDY    WAGAM AN 

REAL  ESTATE    •   INSURANCE 

Phones:  IV.  9-3677;  IV.  9-9514 
2760  FULTON   AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Fi'hruary  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  41 


Fruitridge  Manor  Barber  Shop 

Men,  Women  and  Children's  Haircutting 

Hours  9  A.M.  to  6  P.M.  Except  Sundays 

Phone  HI.  5-9518 

5420  FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACR.AMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

SUBURBAN  BUILDING  SUPPLY  CO. 

Hardware   •    Millwork    •    Building  Material 

Sporting  Goods    •    Custom  Gunsmith 

1700  WATT  AVENUE 

IV.  9-3460 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

IKE  HEINRICH  TRUCKING 

GENERAL  HAULING 

LOCAL  AND  STATEWIDE  HAULING 

Phone  IV.  9-7960 

1345  JONAS  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

RAY    HAZELWOOD 

PAINTING  AND  DECORATING 
Sheetrock  Finishing    •    Paper  Hanging 
Free  Estimates    •    Immediate  Service 


2824  DOLORES   DRIVE- 
SACRAMENTO 


-IV.   9-4049 

CALIFORNI.A 


DONNA'S  BEAUTY  SHOP 

MRS.  A.  C.  CLARK.  Prop. 

Phone  WA.  5-8463 
57  POPLAR  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

THREE  LITTLE  SHAVERS 

BARBER  SHOP 

EXPERT  HAIRCUTTING 

Service  with  a  Smile 

DENNIEVILLE  ON  FOLSOM  BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Remember — There  Are  19  Reasons  Why  You 
Will  Do  Better  at 

Hamilton   Furniture  Company 

LIBERAL  TERMS 
9  A.M.   to  6   P.M. — 9   to  9   Tues.   &   Fri. 

HI.  7-6504 
3160  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

KEYSTONE  GARAGE 

STEVE  WEBER — BILL  PUTHUFF 
Proprietors 

GENERAL  AUTO  REPAIRING 

SUN  SCIENTIFIC  MOTOR  TUNEUP 

USED  PARTS  AND  USED  CARS 

"Customers  Are  Our  Friends" 

Phone  WA.  5-6292 

3232  LOWER  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


ARCADE  PLUMBING  CO. 

PLUMBING  AND  HEATING 

IVanhoe  9-2906 
2730  ELVYRA  WAY 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


GLEN'S  DEL  PASO  SERVICE 

EXPERT  LUBRICATION 

MOTOR  TUNE-UP  AND  BRAKE  WORK 

Phone  IV.  9-8765 

MARCONI  &  WATT  AVENUES 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


[ohnsDii  and  parked  by  the  gasoline 
pimip>.  Johnson  left  the  warmth  of  his 
oil  stove  and  approached  the  car.  He  was 
greeted  by  the  muzzle  of  a  revolver. 

Johnson  grinned.  "I  remember  >ou. 
Voii  shouldn't  joke  like  that." 

"If  you  think  it's  a  joke  just  try  to  do 
something  about  it,"  the  gunman  an- 
swered.  "Get  back  into  that  office." 

With  the  menacing  muzzle  of  the  gun 
prodding  his  ribs  Johnson  backed  into  the 
office.  Inside  two  other  men.  Jack  Duane, 
night  watchman  who  had  stopped  by  to 
purchase  a  flashlight  battery,  and  Rex 
Hayden,  a  friend  who  had  dropped  by 
for  a  chat,  stood  by  the  oil  stove.  Ihe 
buck  toothed  gunman  motioned  for  them 
to  raise  their  hands. 

"Get  the  money,"  the  older  bandit 
nodded  at  his  young  companion.  I  he 
\outh  scurried  into  the  room  and  emptied 
the  cash  register.  He  returned  to  his  seat 
in  the  cab. 

A  shot  resounded  against  the  walls  of 
the  tiny  room.  Senselessly  the  older  gun- 
man had  fired  directly  into  Johnson's 
face.  The  attendant  felt  a  bullet  burn 
through  his  throat. 

"Stop  it,  you  fool !"  Realizing  there 
was  little  chance  that  the  bandit  would 
stop  shooting,  Hayden  charged  forward 
in  a  desperate  attempt  to  end  the  bar- 
rage. With  his  head  scarcely  an  inch 
away  from  the  blazing  gun,  a  second  shot 
was  fired.  The  bullet  seared  through 
Hayden's  hat  and  plowed  a  furrow  across 
the  top  of  his  head.  He  fell  to  the 
ground  screaming. 

Duane  reached  toward  his  own  gmi 
and  drew  desperately.  He  never  got  well 
started.  Before  the  revolver  was  half 
out  of  the  holster  a  bullet  had  coursed 
through  his  brain  and  killed  him.  He 
was  dead  when  he  crumpled  to  the  floor. 
The  bandit  turned  his  gun  back  on  Hay- 
den, who  lay  writhing  on  the  floor  be- 
neath him.  He  squeezed  the  trigger  once 
more  and  the  bullet  crashed  through  the 
prostrate  man's  elbow.  With  a  final 
glance  at  the  devastation  he  had  wrought 
the  bandit  entered  the  cab  and  disap- 
peared into  the  night. 

Downtown  Chief  O'Brien  appeared  at 
the  leading  radio  stations.  After  a  brief 
conference  with  the  executives  he  cut  in 
on  each  wave  length.  Startled  radio  fans 
heard  a  rare  broadcast  that  night. 

"All  San  Francisco  police  officers  who 
are  listening  to  this  program  report  to 
their  stations.  An  emergency  has  devel- 
oped. This  is  Chief  of  Police  O'Brien 
speaking." 

Once  again  \olunteer  help  flooded  the 
police  department.  Colonel  Bolles,  com- 
manding officer  at  the  Presidio,  called 
and  told  O'Brien  that  the  Thirtieth  In- 


MITSUWA  COMPANY 

Oriental   Food  and  Chinawares 

309  "O"  STREET 

Hudson  4-8287 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  GI  3-3694 

JIMMIE'S  EXPRESS 

LOCAL  AND  LONG  DISTANCE  TRIPS 

REFRIGERATORS  &  LUGGAGE 

Day   and  Night  Service 

407    N  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Ahem  Hardwood   Floor  Co. 

LAYING— SANDING— REFINISHING 

3933  U  Street 

Phone  HI.  6-4836 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


SAM'S   MARKETS 

Two  Locations  to  Serve  You 
CHOICE  MEATS — GROCERIES— VEGETABLES 

BEER  AND  WINE 
4151  23rd  Avenue  431   N  Street 

Phone  HI.  6-1468  Phone  Gl.  3-8464 

California -Arizona-Nevada-New   Mexico -Texas 

WESTERN  TRUCK  LINES.  Ltd. 

IN  THE  WEST— SHIP  WESTERN 
811    "X"  Street  Hudson  1-0294 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Sutter  Variety  and   Fountain 

COSMETICS — GIFTS — SUNDRIES 
DRUG  SUPPLIES 


Phone  GI.  3-4084 

SACRAMENTO 


10th  and  T  Streets 

CALIFORNIA 


Phone  GI.  29582 


Courteous  Service 


CHARLEY'S   RICHFIELD   SERVICE 

WASHING — LUBRICATION — ACCESSORIES 

We  Give  United  Trading  Stamps 

Corner  9th  and  P  St. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CLARK  OSADA  REALTY  CO. 

Phone  GI.  2-5320 
611  O  STREET 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


24   Hour  Service  Enpuku   Rooms 

GEORGE  OKIMOTO- Enpuku 

DEPENDABLE   AUTO   FOR  HIRE 

LOCAL  and  LONG  DISTANCE 

Phone  Gilbert  2-0351  Res.  601   N  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

NEW  MODERN   MARKET 

Complete  Line  Groceries — Meats — Vegetables 

RAY   NALANGAN,  Owner 

Phone  GI.  2-5991  430  N  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

MAXiNE'S  COFFEE  SHOP 

BREAKFAST  •   LUNCH   •   SHORT  ORDERS 

COMPLETE  FOUNTAIN  SERVICE 

Phone  HU.  6-2749 

4812   FOLSOM   BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

STRICKLEY  MEN'S  SHOP 

Phone  HI.  6-3431 
5691  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Dial  Hlllcrest  5-9607  On  Highways  99  &  SO 

SWAN     MOTEL 

CLEAN,  COMFORTABLE  MODERN  COTTAGES 

V2  Mile  South  of  City  Limits 

RT.  4,  BOX  3310 — STOCKTON  BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Aero    Batteries    •    Federal   Tires    •    Veedol  Lube 

McClellan  Field  Associated  Service 

WASHING  AND  POLISHING 

JOHN    McANDREWS,    Proprietor— IV.   9-9813 
COR.  WATT  AVENUE  AND  NORTH  HAVEN 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  42 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fchruary    /95,i 


ARTHUR  J.  AZEVEDO 

PLASTERING  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  GI.  3-1030 

1220  X  STREET 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


DALLAS  AUTO  SERVICE 

F.   PICKVET,  Prop. 

COMPLETE  AUTOMOTIVE   REPAIRING 

Phone  GI.  2-9297  1100  W  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

SOUTH   SIDE  GROCERY 

MANUEL  J.  MACHADO,  Prop. 

MEAT— VEGETABLES— LIQUORS 

GI.  3-9364  601    T   Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

FREMONT  MARKET 

GROCERIES— MEATS— VEGETABLES 
2300  N  STREET 
Phone  GI.  3-9332 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

WESTERN   HOME   FURRIERS 

CAPES  AND  STOLES  A  SPECIALTY 

FEATURING  LATE  MODELS 

Phone  GI.  2-5984  1108  O  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

VINE  &  McGOWN 

SHELL  DEALER   •   SERVICE  IS  MY  BUSINESS 
FIRESTONE  TIRES  &  BATTERIES 

Phone  IVanhoe  9-9936 
FAIR  OAKS  AND  WATT  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Mohawk  Petroleum  Corporation 

Sacramento  Division 

Telephone  IV.  7-051S 

AUBURN  BLVD.  &  FULTON  AVE. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

PARK  LANE  MOTEL 

New  and  Modern  36  Units  and  Apartments 

LARGE  TRAILER  COURT 

1  Mile  South  of  Sacramento  on  U.  S.  Highway  99 

Rt.  1,  Box  2999 — HI.  5-9819  and  HU.  6-3825 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

GRAHAM-HOEME  PLOW  CO..  INC. 

6256  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 
Phone   Hlllcrest  7-0388 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LeRoy   Hall's    Sheet    Metal    Works 

"ANYTHING  of  ANY  METAL" 

Sheet  Metal  Work  of  Every  Description 

HI.  7-4962 

HI.  7-4074 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

STEVENS   BROS.  GARAGE 

"ART" 

General  Auto  Repairing   •    Brake  Service 

HI.  6-0356 

7220  FRUITRIDGE   ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

"Two  Heel"  Shoe  Sales  &  Repairs 

WOODRUFF  BROS..  Props. 

"Weather  Bird"  Shoes  for  Children 

"Peters"  Dress  and  Work  Shoes  for  Men 

Ph.  HU.  6-3368 

5352  FRUITRIDGE  RD.  &  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

KAY'S  BEAUTY  SHOP 

MAXINE  IRNST,  Prop. 
Specializing  in   Permanent  Waving 

Phone  IV.  7-1029 
3396  FULTON  AVE.  AT  EDISON 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

WENTZ  WOOD  CARVING 
&  CABINET  SHOP 

Repairing    •Refinishing    •    Antiques 

Phone   IV.  9-3590 

1547  FULTON  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


t'aiiti  y  vvas  at  his  disposal  to  use  in  what- 
ever manner  he  chose  in  trapping  the  ter- 
ror bandits.  He  also  loaned  the  city  a 
truckload  of  shotguns  and  ammunition. 
Hundreds  of  citizens  donated  their  cars 
to  the  search  and  soon  all  of  the  San 
Francisco  police  department  was  on 
wheels.  The  American  Legion  turned 
out  en  masse.  Soon  a  well  organized 
force  of  2,000  men  augmented  the  police 
department. 

Lieutenant  Dullea  returned  to  head- 
quarters after  a  preliminary  investigation 
of  the  robberies. 

"One  of  them  is  the  same  man  who 
was  shooting  up  the  town  Saturday 
night,"  he  reported,  "but  the  other  has 
gone  through  a  change  of  some  sort.  He 
doesn't  sound  like  the  same  man.  We 
ought  to  get  that  ta.\i." 

"I've  ordered  every  cab  to  get  off  the 
streets  as  fast  as  they  report  in,"  said 
O'Brien.  "That  will  eliminate  the  num- 
ber of  vehicles  we  will  have  to  look  for. 
Each  police  district  has  been  divided  into 
zones  with  scores  of  police  and  volun- 
teers patrolling  it.  They  can't  continue 
much  longer  without  being  caught." 

Ihe  bandits  continued  to  operate, 
however,  in  spite  of  O'Brien's  precau- 
tions. Albert  Anderson,  a  sailor  walking 
along  the  waterfront,  was  the  ne.xt  vic- 
tim. 

"I'm  broke,"  he  protested  when  the 
older  bandit  confronted  him  with  a  gun. 
He  had  scarcely  uttered  the  words  when 
the  automatic  smashed  against  his  face. 
He  was  taken  to  the  Harbor  emergency 
hospital  with  brain  concussion. 

A  few  moments  later  Manuel  An- 
drade  and  Tony  Surkovich,  coowners  of 
a  restaurant,  spotted  the  cab  while  walk- 
ing home  together.  They  broke  and  ran, 
Hceing  like  frightened  deer  along  the 
sidewalk.  The  cab  pulled  up  beside 
them,  the  black  haired  man  leaped  from 
it,  pounced  on  Surkovich,  beat  him  over 
the  head  with  the  gun  butt,  and  took 
seven  dollars. 

"They  didn't  shoot,"  Chief  O'Brien 
remarked  when  the  report  came  into 
headquarters.  "Could  they  be  out  of 
ammunition?" 

Further  evidence  that  the  pair  were 
carrying  empty  guns  came  a  few  mo- 
ments later  when  Stephen  ^Valker,  a 
young  carpenter,  faced  them  in  a  service 
station. 

"Take  my  money,"  Walked  begged, 
"but  keep  your  bullets  to  yourself.  I've 
got  a  wife  and  kids  at  home." 

Jhe  black  haired  bandit  raised  his  gun 
menacingly. 

"Let  him  go,"  his  young  companion 
urged.  "Enough  people  have  been  hurt.  " 
As  he  spoke  Officer  Dorsey  Henderson, 
driving  his  own  car,  entered  the  station. 


MacBRIDE   REALTY  CO. 

DEE  RUSSELL 

HOME  SPECIALIST 

Res.   IV.  9-2748 

1980  FULTON  AVENUE 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


COOPER    BROS. 

PLASTERING  CONTRACTORS 

FREE  ESTIMATES 

Phone  IV.  9-9027 

1871   KUBEL  CIRCLE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BAKERS  SERVICES  UNLIMITED 

"WE  REPAIR  ANYTHING" 

Specializing  in  Major  Appliance  Repairs 

Phone  IV.  9-6615 

2810  TIOGA  WAY 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

CAPITAL  PLUMBING  COMPANY 

Water   Heater  Experts-Radiant    Heating  Engrs. 

General  Plumhing  Service-Sprinkling  Systems 

IV.  9-5837 

2565  DOWIE  PLACE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

ARDEN  TOWN  JEWELER 

SPECIALIZING  IN  WATCH  REPAIRING 

Special  Discounts  to  AH  Peace  Officers 

Returning  This  Ad 

576  LA  SIERRA  DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Central  Valley  Scientific  Supply 

5266  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BARMBY  DISTRIBUTING  CO. 

Distributor  of  Valvoline  Oils  and  Greases 
CLARITE  BATTERIES  •  WIX  FILTERS 
ROUTE  2,  BOX  3868 — Phone  HI.  5-0110 
V2  Mile  East  of  Underpass  on  Folsom  Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA.- 

FRED     STRUVE 

CEMENT  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  HI.  6-7022 

Patios    •   Drives    •   Walks    •   Steps 

LEMON  HILL  AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

WM.    KEMP    CO. 

WEATHERSTRIPPING  CONTRACTORS 

INSULATION 

HI.  7-1435 

4931   FRUITRIDGE  ROAD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2-8550 

Manuel   Lopes 


Electric  Works 

MOTORS  REPAIRED  AND  REWOUND 
2113  "N"  STREET 


SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Box  Lunch  40c — Tasty,  Different,  Reasonable 

Boitano's  Homaid   Box  Lunch 

We  Specialize  in  Sandwiches  and  Salads 

for  AH  Occasions 

Phone   GI.  3-0241  1703  "T"  Street 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

DILLE'S  TRAILER  COURT 

CLEAN— ATTRACTIVE— LARGE  SPACES 

REASONABLE  RATES 

Phone  IV.  7-2443  5662  Auburn  Blvd. 

Between  Manzanita  and  Antelope  Rds. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  WA.  5-4209  J.  L.  Petersen 

EL  CORTEZ  MOTEL 

DE  LUXE  ACCOMMODATIONS 

BEST  WESTERN 

2224  Auburn  Boulevard  Highway  50  and  99E 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Superior  Maintenance  Equipment 

SERVICE  STATION   MAINTENANCE 

&  INSTALLATION  CO. 

Phone  GI.  3-7478 

1910  Q  STREET 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


l-\hniary    195.^ 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  43 


McCOY'3  CHEVRON   SERVICE 

RPM  LUBRICATION 

EL  CAMINO  &  MARYAL  DR.— IV.  9-4713 

At  Del  Paso  Manor  Shopping  Center 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

E.  L.  BELL  &  SON 

FRIENDLY   MOBIL  DEALER 
FREE  PICK-UP  AND  DELIVERY  SERVICE 

GASOLINE    •    OIL    •    LUBRICATION 
2371   FAIR  OAKS  BLVD. — IVanhoe  9-9974 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

CAPITAL  TIRE  CO. 

Wheel  Balancing   •   Recapping   •   Repairing 

NEW  AND  USED  TIRES 

Phone  WA.  S-4251 

20TH  AND  AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

M.  and   M.  AUTO  COURT 

GUS  &  VIOLET  BYARS 
Kitchenettes    with    Baths — Trailer   Space 

Phone  WA.  5-9946 
2950  AUBURN  BLVD.  at  18TH  ST. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Yishihara  Manufacturing  Co. 

CEMENT   LAUNDRY   TRAYS 

WHOLESALE   -  RETAIL 

Space-Saving   18-I:ich   Width   Shingles 

Phone   HU.  4-2650 — 510   P    St. 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LAWRENCE  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

CLARK  K.  LAWRENCE 

3020  V  STREET 

HI.  6-3835 


Gambles  Western  Auto  Supply  Co. 

ROUTE  7.  BOX  1321 
Phone  IV.  9-5660 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Call    Us   .    .   .   We   Pick   Up   All   Kinds   of  Rubbish 
NORTH  AREA 

Garbage  and   Rubbish  Service 

1989  FULTON  AVENUE 
IVanhoe  9-0330 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

GREETINGS  TO  ALL  OUR  FRIENDS 

CLINE'S  SURPLUS 

NEW  AND  USED  FURNITURE 

Phone  IV.  7-1362 
4936  AUBURN   BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

VANITY  BEAUTY  SALON 

Personalized   Hair  Styling 

MYRTLE  WHISENAND      Hlllcrest   3-8307 

4945  FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Sales-Service 


Liberal  Trades 


GLENN'S  TRAILERS,   INC. 

THE  HOME  OF  THE  FAMOUS  SPARTANS 

WA.  5-2865 

1020  EAST  EL  CAMINO  AVE. 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO  CALIFOFRNIA 

NEW  CHINA  CAFE 

CHINESE  AND  AMERICAN  FOOD 

TO  TAKE  OUT 
Open  Daily  11:00  A.M.  to  12:00  M. 
Saturday   11:00  A.M.  to  1:00  A.M. 

WA.  5-8672 
3211   MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

HAGGINWOOD  CALIFORNIA 


Lcoiuird  Strand,  the  prdpn'ctor,  gcstiir  >' 
toward  tlu*  pair. 

"Cjet  thcni,"  he  shouted.  "I'liey're  the 
terror  bandits !" 

Instead  of  turning  their  guns  on  the 
officer  as  they  had  in  the  past,  the  duo 
leaped  into  their  car  and  sped  away. 
Henderson  threw  his  car  into  gear  and 
followed  them,  his  gun  spouting  flam" 
The  ijunnien's  luck  held,  however,  an  1 
they  eluded  the  pursuing  officer.  A  few 
hlocks  away  he  found  the  wrecked  cab  at 
Ibth  Street,  apparently  where  the  pair 
had  failed  to  negotiate  a  sharp  turn. 

Ihe  cab  was  found  just  two  blocks 
away  from  the  spot  where  Officer  Doyle 
stood  guard  over  its  murdered  owner's 
body. 

Speeding  to  the  scene  Lieutenant  Dul- 
lea  found  Swanson's  blue  overcoat  plus 
a  blue  steel  automatic  in  the  car. 

"At  least  we  might  be  able  to  get  this 
gun  to  tell  us  something,"  he  remarked. 

While  Dullea  investigated  the  taxi  a 
huge  touring  car  roaded  across  the  via- 
duct two  blocks  away.  Officer  Doyle,  at 
his  post  by  Swanson's  body,  waved  his 
flashlight  angrily,  motioning  for  it  to 
stop.  I'he  response  was  an  insane  laugh, 
followed  bv  a  burst  of  gunfire. 

Officer  Doyle  flattened  himself  against 
the  ground  and  answered  the  killer's 
shots  with  bullets  of  his  own.  The  car 
sped  on  into  the  night,  unharmed.  The 
encounter  with  Doyle,  like  the  meeting 
with  Chief  (^'Hrien  on  Saturday  night, 
appeared  to  be  enough  for  the  murder- 
ous duo.  I  hey  had  no  taste  for  answer- 
ing gunfire,  and  did  not  strike  again  that 
night. 

Behind  them  lay  four,  possibly  five, 
murders,  several  men  critically  wounded, 
and  a  score  of  robbery  victims.  San 
Francisco  was  a  city  living  in  terror.  Not 
since  the  days  of  Seimsen  and  Dabner, 
the  "Gas  Pipe  Bandits,"  had  it  witnessed 
such  an  orgy  of  wanton  murder. 

Men  from  the  Pinkerton  and  Burns 
detecti\e  agencies  reported  at  police 
headquarters  to  help  in  the  man  hunt. 
Blockades  had  been  thrown  across  all 
roads  leading  from  San  Francisco.  Police 
worked  all  night  and  into  the  next  day, 
raiding  underworld  dives,  searching  ho- 
tels and  boarding  houses,  and  questioning 
every  suspicious  character. 

The  first  break  in  the  case  came  the 
next  day  when  Jim  Lawson,  a  cafe  em- 
ploye, reported  to  police  that  he  had  been 
beaten  the  pre\ious  Saturday  night  b\ 
the  killers. 

"One  of  them  pulled  a  gun,"  he  re- 
ported, "but  his  friend  said  to  let  me 
go.    He  knew  me." 

"Who  was  he?"  Captain  Mathesen 
inquired. 

"I    don't    know    exactly,    except    that 


CHAS.  S.  WEETE 

Aero   Rug  &   Upholstery  Cleaners 

WALL-TO-WALL  INSTALLATION 
RUG  BINDING 

WAbash  S-2481 
1021   EL  MONTE  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Free   Estimates 


Telephone   WA.   5-1451 


SEWER  CONTRACTOR 

STATE  LICENSED   •  INSURED 

MARCOR  N.  DUUS 

130  NORTH  lOTH  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


OUR  PLACE 

Art  Lo  Dahl,  Prop. 

"The  Biggest  Little  Beer 
Ptirlor  ill  Toiiii" 

Phone  WA.  5-1381 
130  NORTH  NINTH  STREET 
North  Sacramento,  California 


INDUSTRIAL  PARTS 
SUPPLY,  INC. 

Parts   Specialists   in   Hea\y 
Duty  Machinery 

Phone  WA  5-0817 

920  Del  Paso  Boulevard 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO, 

CALIFORNIA 


HAGGINWOOD 
TEXACO  SERVICE 

CLIFF    WILLIAMS 

SERVICE  OUR  SPECIALTY 

Phone  WA  5-9820 

3295  Marysville  Road 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO, 

CALIFORNIA 


Page  44 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1 953 


Telephone  Dial  Hickory  9-4296 

DEL  PASO  GLASS  CO. 

Window  -  Plate  -   Auto  Glass  and  Mirrors 

Structural  Glass  and  Steel  Sash 

Arcadia  Sliding  Doors 

AUB.  SMITH  AL  RATZLAFF 

1019  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  WA.  5-1891 

RALPH'S  PHARMACY 

RALPH  M.  ROMESBURG 
Quality  Prescription  Service 

1120  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Kistler  Appliance  -  Television 

WALTER   KISTLER,   Prop. 

1810  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 
WAbash  5-2376 

1715  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 
WAbash  5-6337 

E.W.WARNER  F.C.PHILLIPS 

CASCADE  TOWEL  SUPPLY 

Let   Us  End  Your  Clean 
Towel  Worries 

2208  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

WA.  5-9813 
Hunting  and  Fishing  Headquarters 

WAYNE   R.  SWART 

HARDWARE  .  .  .  PAINTS 

Dial  WA.  5-0784 
1927  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

GIDE  APPLIANCE  CO. 

VERNE  V.  GIBBS 

WESTINGHOUSE 

GIBSON 

WESTERN  HOLLY 

SPARTON  TV 

1512  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

Telephone  WA.  9-7486 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

El   Rancho  Trailer  Village 

W.  V.  CARTER  O.  M.  CUSTER 

"The  Particular  Place  for  Particular  People" 

GRACE  and  JACK  ROBINSON,  Mgrs. 

Phone  WA.  5-9931 

1200  East  EL  CAMINO  AVE. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

STUDIO  OF  REFLEXOLOGY 

STORIES  THE  FEET  TELL 
ZONE  THERAPY 

FLORENCE  STEINRICH 

Phone  WA.  5-3240 
317  FAIRFIELD  STREET 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO  CALIFFORNIA 


people  call  him  Buck  ami  he  hangs 
around  the  Knights  of  the  Red  Branch 
Hall.  He  would  probably  be  there  to- 
night." 

Mathesoii  detailed  Detective  Sergeant 
Allen  McGinn  and  two  other  officers  to 
go  to  the  hall  that  night  with  Lawson. 
Shotgun  squads  were  stationed  outside, 
waiting  for  violent  resistance.  But  al- 
though they  searched  until  the  nightly 
dance  ended  the  mysterious  Buck  never 
appeared. 

The  follov\'ing  night  Chief  of  Police 
O'Brien  spoke  for  the  second  time  over 
the  air  and  assured  the  terrified  citizens 
of  San  Francisco  that  they  were  safe 
from  further  murder  raids  by  the  Mad 
Dog. 

Police  continued  to  work  night  and 
day  in  an  effort  to  track  down  the  killers. 
Police  districts  were  still  subdi\ided  into 
zones,  and  the  zones  were  broken  down 
into  special  categories  such  as  hotels,  res- 
taurants, boarding  houses,  private  homes, 
business  establishments,  pool  halls,  even 
to  vacant  lots. 

Each  of  these  places  was  searched, 
their  occupants  questioned,  and  all  sus- 
picious characters  taken  to  the  Hall  of 
Justice  for  further  examination.  Par- 
ticular attention  was  paid  to  underworld 
dives  and  speakeasies.  Still  no  good  sus- 
pect was  located.  Repeated  attempts  to 
find  the  mysterious  "Buck"  at  the 
Knights  of  the  Red  Branch  Hall  failed. 

After  repeated  wild  goose  chases  for 
two  days,  Detectives  Louis  DeMattei  and 
George  "Paddy"  Wafer  conceived  the 
idea  of  continuing  their  search  at  night 
in  the  company  of  two  e.xcons  who  had 
offered  to  help  track  down  the  killers. 

The  pair  continued  their  specified  du- 
ties during  the  day,  but  made  the  rounds 
of  underworld  hangouts  at  night  with 
the  friendly  felons.  In  several  pool 
rooms  they  heard  talk  about  an  Irish- 
man, an  Italian,  and  a  man  known  only 
as  "Gooseneck." 

Both  the  Italian  and  the  Irishman 
were  located,  but  both  produced  unshake- 
able  alibis.  Still  not  discouraged,  De- 
!\Iattei  and  Wafer  continued  their  search 
for  Gooseneck.  After  almost  a  week  of 
steady  work  one  of  their  e.xcons  located 
a  man  who  knew  "Gooseneck."  Con- 
fronted by  the  detectives,  he  was  reticent. 

"I'd  be  crazy  to  rat  on  a  guy  who  has 
killed  five  people,"  he  remarked.  "AVhat 
makes  you  think  I'd  live  to  testify?" 

"^Ve'll  see  that  you're  well  taken  care 
of,"  Wafer  promised.  "Anyway,  the 
sooner  we  get  Gooseneck,  the  safer  you 
are.  What  makes  you  think  he'll  let  you 
live  now?" 

With  the  promise  of  special  protection 
the  man  xolunteered  the  information 
that    he    had    seen    "Gooseneck"   with    a 


HAGGINWOOD  CLEANERS 

FOR  THE  PEOPLE  WHO  CARE 

WE  CALL  FOR  AND  DELIVER 

We  Give  Cash  Checks 

Phone  WA.  5-3155 
3213  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CREST  CAFE 

GOOD   COFFEE 

STEAKS — CHOPS— SEAFOODS 

Businessmen's  Lunch 

Homemade  Pies 

Phone  WA.  5-6688 
1924  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 


NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


GRADY'S  SHELL  SERVICE 

SERVICE   IS   OUR   BUSINESS 

Phone  WA.  5-9953 
2320  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Tel:  WA.  5-6561 

ALLRED'S  HOBBY  SHOP 

PLANES  -  CARS  -  BOATS 

BISQUE  WARE  -  COPPER 

TEXTILE  PAINT,  ETC. 

3383  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HAGGINWOOD   FAMILY  SHOP 

CLOTHING  -  NOTIONS 

SIMPLICITY  PATTERNS  -  YARD  GOODS 

A  FULL  LINE  OF  DRY  GOODS 

Phone  WA.  5-6191 
3091    MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CHARM   CENTER   BEAUTY  SHOP 

MRS.  DORIS  M.  BALLINGER 

COMPLETE  BEAUTY  SERVICE 

3167  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

Phone  WA.  5-0790 


Hoyt's  Do-Nut  and  Coffee  Shop 

HONEY  GLAZED  POTATO  DOUGHNUTS 

Phone  WA.  5-9959 
1525  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  WA.  5-2331 

DYNAN'S  CABINET  SHOP 

T.  E.  DYNAN.  Proprietor 

STORE  FIXTURES 

SPECIALIZED  STORE  FIXTURES 

128  NORTH  9TH  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


/  ,  hriiarx    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  45 


Phone  WA.  S-3856 

COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

DR.  ALLEN  C.  JAYNES,  Denihi 

3202  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

RANALD  J.  AITKENS 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTANT 
Bookkeeping  and   Tax  Service 

MAIL-ME  MONDA'l' 

TeUphone  WA.  5-5424 

1719  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TRADER  DAN 

The  Used  Car  Man 

AH  BUY  'EM,  AH  SELL  'EM,  AH  TRADE  'EM 

Phone  Hickory   5-7151 

1444  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Olyn  E.  Nightingale 


Daymon  Nightingale 


^vightingale's  Funeral  Chcpci 
and  Amb-jSancs  Service 

"Serving  the  people  of  this  area,  with 

equal  consideration,   regardless   of   creed 

or  earthly  possessions." 

Telephone  V/Abash  5-0242 
1030  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


FREEZERS 


APPLIANCES 


MARKS  AND   KENT 

JOHN   KENT 

Complete  Home  Food  Plan 

HI.  9-2187 

1316  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNI.A 

PACIFIC   REFRIGERATION   STORE 

1071    East  El  Catnino  Avenue 

HEIL  BROS. 

Contractors,  Sales  &  Service 

Sheet  Metal  -  Air  Conditioning 

Commercial    Refrigeration 

Office  Phone  WAbash  5-3503 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BALKOW  NURSERY  AND  FLORIST 

Shrubs  -  Patted  Plants  -  Garden  Supplies 
Fertilizers  -  Insecticides 

BALKOW  GIFT  SHOP 

Brass   -   Copper  -  Ceramics 

PLANTERS 

Planted  and   Unptanted 

Phone  WA.  5-9491 

2993  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Walker's  New  and  Used   Furniture 

WE  BUY  HIGH  AND 
SELL  FOR  LESS 

Phone  WA.  5-7308 

2615  RIO  LINDA  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


ficshh  baiulagcil  n'Kht  hand  at  a  Waller 
Street  saloon  in  the  wee  hours  of  Suiuia> 
morning.  He  added  that  the  man  had 
talked  to  the  proprietor  of  the  speakeas\ 
and  apparently  knew  him, 

DeMattei  ami  Wafer  \  isited  the  Wal- 
ler Street  speakeasy  that  night. 

"Sure  I  know  a  fellow  they  call 
'Gooseneck',"  the  proprietor  told  the  of- 
ficers, "He  comes  in  here  all  the  time. 
Is  there  any  trouble?  ' 

"\Vas  he  in  here  Saturda\'  night?  " 

"Not  Saturday  night  exactly.  Sunday 
morning  about  three  a.m.,"  the  man  re- 
plied. "He  had  a  bloody  rag  over  his 
hand  and  he  seemed  worried  about  some- 
thing." 

"He  should  ha\T  been,"  Wafer  re- 
marked. The  inspectors  learned  through 
questioning  se\eral  of  the  habitues  of  the 
place  that  "Gooseneck's"  proper  nam? 
was  Lawrence  Weeks  and  that  he  li\ed 
in  a  cheap  boarding  hovise  on  Howard 
Street. 

A  visit  to  the  Howard  Street  address 
revealed  that  the  suspect  worked  at  the 
Duboce  Street  tunnel,  drank  quite  a  bit, 
but  otherwise  lived  a  quiet  life. 

"We'd   better   not   pick   him   up   \et, 
DeMattei  suggested.    "If  we  watch  him 
he    might    lead    us    to    the    other    killer. 
Prom  the  way  these  jobs  went,  I'd  sa\'  he 
was  the  worst  of  the  two." 

I  he  detecti\es  agreed  to  visit  the 
Duboce  Street  tunnel  the  following  day 
and  watch  their  quarry  from  a  distance. 
Weeks  was  pointed  out  to  them  by  thr 
foreman  on  the  job.  He  fitted  the  de- 
scription of  the  number  two  man  on  the 
Saturday  night  crimes  perfectly.  His  face 
was  heavy  boned  with  close  set  eyes,  but 
he  in  no  way  tallied  with  the  man  who 
had  accompanied  the  buck  toothed  killer 
on  the  following  Alonday. 

"I  wonder  if  there  can  be  a  third 
man,  "  DeMattei  observed. 

"Let's  watch  him  and  find  out.  " 

A  three  day  vigil  added  nothing  to 
their  information.  From  a  neighboring 
rooftop  the\  watched  the  suspect  and  saw 
nothing  in  his  behavior  that  would  dis- 
tinguish him  from  other  men.  Finger- 
prints were  obtained  through  the  fore- 
man, but  when  these  were  taken  to  the 
rogues  galler\  in  the  bureau  of  identifi- 
cation none  were  found  that  \vould 
match  them.  The  fellow  evidently  had 
no  previous  criminal  record. 

Ihe  behavior  of  Weeks  oft  the  job 
was  just  as  exemplary  as  his  record  indi- 
cated. He  drank  a  lot,  but  otherwise  had 
no  associations  with  the  iniderworld  nor 
any  evident  inclination  toward  crime. 
One  flaw  was  found,  however,  that  was 
out  of  line  with  the  man's  general  char- 
acter. 

An   examination   of    his   bank   account 


Office  WA.  5-5517 


Res.  WA.  5-9674 


Frank's  Sewer,  Plumbing  and 
Septic  Tank  Service 

STATE  LICENSED  CONTRACTOR 

Sewer  and  Drain  Lines  Installed 

Septic  Tanks  Cleaned.  Built  and  Repaired 

Basement   Pumping 

FRANK   ROMANO.  Owner 

3010  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

The  Club  Where  All  Good  Friends  Meet 

TOPSY  TURVY  CLUB 

Jim  Cameron   -    Barbara   Cameron 

Cocktails  -  Entertainment 
Hours   10  A.M.  to  2  A.M. 

Phone  WA.  S-9979 
2128  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH   S.ACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

IVERS  E.  "BILL"  WILEY 

WILEY  AND   SON 

AUTOMOBILE  &  HEAVY  DUTY  REPAIR 
MARINE— INDUSTRIAL 

WA.   5-4213 

R.  R.  Box  635 

LOWER  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

Just   North  of  Silver  Eagle 


VERN'S  FEED  AND  HARDWARE 

FEED  -  SEED  -  HAY  -  GRAIN 

PET  SUPPLIES 

HARDWARE 

WA.  5-6405 
3216  LOWER  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

ESSEX  PENCIL   PRODUCTS 
COMPANY.   INC. 

Manufacturers  of 

VENUS-VELVET  PENCILS 


NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


J.  C.   BECKER 

PLUMBING  AND  HEATING 

REPAIR  WORK  OUR  SPECIALTY 

Plumbing  Fixtures  of  All  Kinds 

Telephone  WA.  5-6423 
1925  KENWOOD  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TWIN  CITY  OIL  COMPANY 

GASOLINE— OIL— ACCESSORIES 
AUTOMOTIVE  PARTS — GARAGE 

Service  of  All  Kinds 

S&H  Green  Stamps 

1708  AUBURN  BOULEVARD 

Tel.  Wa.  5-1187 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

American  Art  &   Decorating  Co. 

LICENSED  CONTRACTORS 
Painting  -  Paperhanging  -  Tapeing  &  Texturing 

R.  O.  WOODS 
Phone  WAbash  S-7107 
707  ACACIA  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  46 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fchruar]!   1953 


WA.  S-22S9 

SUPREME  CLEANERS 

LUX  THEATRE  BUILDING 
Free  Pick-up  and  Delivery 

1192  EAST  EL  CAMINO 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Muller  Tile  Company,   Inc. 

ONLY  GENUINE  CLAY  USED 

2502  RIO  LINDA  BOULEVARD 
Phone  WA.  S-S300 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Office  Phone  WA.  5-6213 

BROKAW  &  NORMAN 

AUTO  WRECKERS 

USED  CARS  -  USED  PARTS 
RAY  BROKAW 

HI.  9-81  18 

GEO.  NORMAN 

HI.  9-5107 

3000  BEN  ALI  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

PAUL  SIMMONS  H.  T.  DEESE 

PAUL  SIMMONS 

Painting  Contractors 
SHEET  ROCK  FINISHING  A  SPECIALTY 

WA.   5-1753 
621    ALAMOS   AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


C.  p.  HOBBS  -  We//  Drilling 

Phone   WA.    5-9693 
1634  GLENROSE  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

SCOTT  LUMBER  CO. 

"See  Scotty  for  All  Your  Building  Needs" 
Cash  Stamps — Get  Your  Free  Scotty  Tarn 

Phone  WA.  5-1454 
2809  RIO  LINDA  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TOMMY   KELLY'S   CUCKOO   CLUB 

Come  In  and  Meet 
SIS  &  DOT  &  TOM 

Phone  WA.  5-7524 
2426  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

NEVA'S  COFFEE  SHOP 

FOUNTAIN    •    FOOD    •    GOOD  COFFEE 
HOMEMADE  PIES 

Phone  IV.  9-9359 
6118  FAIROAKS  BOULEVARD 

NORTH   CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


revealed  regular  large  depo.sits  that  were 
oversize  for  the  four  dollars  a  day  labor- 
er's wage  he  earned  at  the  tunnel. 

On  Monday,  a  week  after  the  second 
(.rime  orgy,  the  detectives  decided  to  pick 
him  up.  The  first  thing  they  noticed  at 
clo.se  range  was  a  large  raw  scar  on  his 
right  hand. 

"Where  did  yon  get  that?"  they  de- 
manded. 

"I  cut  my  hand  working  in  the  tunnel 
about  a  week  ago,"  Weeks  replied. 

DeMattei  turned  to  the  foreman.  "Did 
he?" 

"He  didn't  report  ainthing  like  that 
to  me,"  was  the  answer. 

DeAIattei  turned  back  to  AV^eeks.  "Get 
in  the  car.   \Ve're  going  for  a  ride." 

Weeks  entered  the  machine  and  the 
three  began  an  automobile  ride  around 
the  city.  For  four  hours  the  three  men 
drove  past  the  scenes  of  the  three-day 
crime  orgy  with  the  detectives  making 
significant  remarks  as  they  passed  the 
point  where  a  particularly  fiendish  ac- 
tion had  taken  place. 

Confronted  bluntly  with  the  fact  that 
he  was  a  suspect,  Weeks  trembled  per- 
ceptibly, but  denied  any  knowledge  of 
the  crime.  Slowly  the  intelligent  ques- 
tioning of  the  officers  broke  down  his 
resistance. 

"I've  had  enough,"  he  said.  "I'll  talk." 

Weeks  admitted  all  of  the  Saturday 
night  robberies  and  the  murder  of  Pa- 
gano,  but  stated  he  had  nothing  to  do 
with  the  killing  of  Biaginni.  Asked 
about  the  Monday  night  jobs.  Weeks 
flatly  denied  having  anything  to  do  with 
them.    He  steadfastly  clung  to  his  story. 

"I  had  all  I  wanted  Monday  night." 

In  spite  of  the  hope  that  the  arrest  of 
Weeks  would  lead  them  to  the  other  kil- 
ler, DeMattei  and  Wafer  were  disap- 
pointed. 

"I  only  knew  him  as  'Buck',"  he  said. 
"Besides,  I  wouldn't  name  him  if  I 
could.  He'd  kill  me  without  batting  an 
eye.  There  is  nothing  you  could  do  to 
protect  me." 

Constant  questioning  at  the  Hall  of 
Justice  by  Lieutenants  Dullea  and  Mc- 
Donald and  finally  by  Chief  O'Brien 
himself  accomplished  nothing.  Weeks, 
either  because  of  fear  or  loyalty,  refuse;! 
to  name  his  companion. 

Meanwhile  Detective  Sergeant  Leo 
Bunner,  making  a  house  to  house  search 
of  his  zone,  discovered  a  cafe  owner  who 
had  overheard  two  men,  both  cab  drivers, 

talking  about  the  murders  and  suggest- 


C  and   M   CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

Specialists   in 
RESIDENTIAL  &  COMMERCIAL  BUILDING 

"CHRIS  CHRISTIE— WA.  50767 

•■DON"  MURCHISON      WA.  54227 

POST  OFFICE  BOX  532 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


SUTTON   &  SUTTON 
Painting  Contractors 

WE  SPECIALIZE  IN  SPRAYING 
Phone  WA.  5-4323 
1419  HOOD  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LINDELL    JONES 

PORTRAITS 

"Serving  North   Sacramento  Area" 

FAMILY  GROUPS— BABIES— COMMERCIAL 

Phone  WA.  5-6311 
2105  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LIVINGSTON'S 
North  Sacramento  Ready  Mix 

Serving  All  Sacramento  and   Vicinity 
SATURDAY  DELIVERIES 

WAbash  5-8575 
500  TRACTION  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


TUCKER  CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

J.  D.  TUCKER 
Commercial    *    Home  Building   *    Remodeling 

WA.  5-1280 
216  FRIENZA  AVENUE 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone   WA.  5-1437 

TAYLOR'S 
Lumber  and  Building  Materials 

THE  NEIGHBORHOOD  LUMBER  YARD 
R.  E.  TAYLOR 

2930  19TH  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

COMPUMENTS  OF 

COPELAND  &  WILKES 

PUBLIC  ACCOUNTANTS 

Richard  L.  Copeland  -   William  A.  Wilkes 

WA.  5-5511 

PROFESSIONS  CENTER 

210  CALVADOS  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


I 


L.    O.    KESTER 

GENERAL  TRUCKING 

Phone  WA.  5-3027 
435  WEST  PARK  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


I  ,  hridiry    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  47 


BUSY  BEE   MARKET 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 

BEER — WINE 

Under   New   Management 

Phone  WA.  5-9945  2781  American  Avenue 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BILL'S  SECOND-HAND  CENTER 

Cable  Chains-Used  Furniture-Belt  Motors 
Stoves-Pipe  &  Fittings-Scrap  Metals-Batteries 

1704  AUBURN  BLVD..  Rt.  7,  Box  1103-A 
Phone  WA.  5-3183  Res.  WA.  5-6144 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


W.  HACK  GREEN 

WELL  DRILLING 
Licensed  Cintractor 

TEST  DRILLING   •   WATER  WELLS 

Phone  IVanhoe  9-0522 

2500  VERNA  WAY 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

TRAILER  CITY  SALES 

ROADMASTERS— DE  VILLE 
ACCESSORIES — SUPPLIES 

Phone  WA.  5-7395 

1099  EAST  EL  CAMINO 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

CONWAY  TRUCK  CO. 

LOCAL  &  LONG  DISTANCE  HAULING 

Phone  WA.  5-9588 
P.  O.  BOX  517 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  WAbash  5-8522 

SLAGLE  ELECTRIC  CO. 

ART  SLAGLE 
ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTING 

1323  CANNON  STREET 


NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Sale 


es  and  bervice 


Expert  Repairs 

WHITE'S  APPLIANCE  SHOP 

Furnaces  -  Water  Heaters 
Ranges  -  Thermostats 

WORK  GUARANTEED 

EVAPORATIVE  COOLERS 

1535  ARCADE  BOULEVARD 

WAbash  5-1709 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


GARDENA  MARKET 

COMPLETE  FOOD  MARKET 

Phone  WA.  5-9896 

3046  LOWER  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


CUSTOM  BUILT  FURNITURE 


DRAPERIES 


GILBERT  D.  KISER 

UPHOLSTERING 

CORNER  RIO  LINDA  &  EL  CAMINO  AVE. 
Bus.  Phone  WA.  5-1617 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Ing  rliar  tlu'N'  wait  tor  a  large  reward  to 
be  offered  before  they  turned  the  killers 
in.  They  talked  about  Walter  Swansnn 
and  mentioned  a  man  named  Kelh'  re- 
peatedly, saying  that  Kelly  had  been  a 
cab  dri\er  himself. 

Detective  Sergeants  George  Wall  and 
William  IMcMahon  were  ordered  to  join 
Hrunner  in  a  thorough  investigation  of 
the  cab  companies.  The  office  manager 
of  the  first  company  contacted  revealed  a 
man  named  Clarence  Kelly  had  work"d 
tor  the  company,  but  left  it  for  another. 

"I  remember  the  boys  called  him 
Huck,"  he  reported. 

A  second  company  was  investigated, 
but  Kelly  had  left  there  also.  Neither 
had  kept  his  address.  iVIcMahon  returned 
til  the  Hall  of  Justice  where  Dullea  and 
.McDonald  were  carrying  on  their  tire- 
less grilling  of  Weeks.  He  handed  them 
the  name  on  a  slip  of  paper. 

Dullea  continued  on  the  line  he  had 
been  following  for  several  minutes, 
scarcely  paying  any  attention  to  the  in- 
terruption. Then  he  shook  AVeeks  with 
a  single  blunt  statement. 

"Your  pal  was  Clarence  Kelly.  \'ou 
might  as  well  admit  it." 

Taken  by  surprise,  Weeks  blurted 
out:  "How  did  you  find  that  out?"  be- 
fore he  realized  what  he  was  saying.  The 
exhausted  young  killer  then  admitted 
that  Kelly  had  been  his  accomplice.  He 
gave  Dullea  a  South  Park  address. 

Confident  that  their  long  vigil  was  al- 
most over,  Lieutenant  McDonald  led  a 
posse  of  detectives  to  the  South  Park 
address.  With  shotguns  poised  for  ac- 
tion and  revolvers  ready,  McDonald, 
with  AVall,  McMahon,  and  Bimner,  en- 
tered the  house. 

"Where's  your  search  warrant?"  an 
indignant  roomer  demanded. 

"  Ihis  time  we  don't  need  one,"  Mc- 
Donald told  him.  1  hey  entered  a  dimly 
lit  third  floor  hallway  and  approached 
room  47,  the  one  singled  out  by  Weeks. 

A  black  haired  voung  man  suddenly 
dodged  out  of  the  room  and  sped  down 
the  back  stairs.  As  the  detectives  reached 
the  back  porch  they  saw  him  double  back 
into  room  49. 

A  familiar  command  to  Kelly,  "Hands 
up!"  was  snapped  by  McDonald,  but  the 
young  man  continued  his  desperate  break 
for  freedom. 

Once  more  police  bullets  went  wing- 
ing after  the  killer,  this  time  with  crip- 
pling accuracy.  Blood  spurted  from  the 
fleeing  man's  arm,  but  failed  to  check  his 
headlong  flight.  A  second  bullet  found 
its  mark.  The  injured  man  staggered, 
but  disappeared  through  the  rear  of 
flat  49. 


COME  IN  AND  GET  ACQUAINTED 

THE  COZY  CLUB 

TONY  KIOS 
2330    Del    Paso    Blvd.  HI.   9-9920 

NORTH   SACRAMKNtO  CALIFORNIA 

NATHAN'S  VARIETY  STORE 

TOYS  our  specialty  the  year  around 

GIFTS— NOTIONS — CERAMICS 

Phono  WA.  9-0155  1611   Del  Paso  Blvd. 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

WOODLAKE  TUNE-UP  SERVICE 

AUTOMOTIVE     CARBURETION     ELECTRICAL 

Telephone  WA.  5-3838 

1224  Del  Paso  Boulevard 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

DRIVE   INN   BARBER   SHOP 

A.   L.  JONES 

Men's — Ladies' — Childrens'   Haircut  ting 

SPECIALIZING  IN  MASSAGES 

Phone  WA.  5-9805  1123-A  Del  Paso  Blvd. 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

PFEIFFER'S  BEACON   SERVICE 

GAS— OIL — LUBRICATION 
EXCELLENT  SERVICE 


Phone  WA.  5-9839 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


2021   Del  Paso  Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 


C.  E.  MARSH  -  Dentist 

1823'  2   DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

Above  Curtis  Drug  Store 

WA.  9-2114 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  HOTEL 

STEAM  HEAT  AIR  CONDITIONED 

ELLA  E.  MOSS,  Mgr. 
WA.  5-9867  2326  Del  Paso  Boulevard 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

ROBIN'S  APPAREL   SHOP 

EVERYTHING  IN  WEARING  APPAREL 
Phone  HI.  9-0334  2116  Del  Paso  Boulevard 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

C.  p.  EDWARDS  CASE  CO. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS  -  REFRIGERATION 

ALL  TYPES  OF  STORE  EQUIPMENT 

Authorized  Commercial  Frigidaire  Dealer 

2965  Del  Paso  Boulevard  Ph  WAbash  5-0173 

NORTH    S.ACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  DEL  PASO  JEWELERS 

FINE  GIFTS — TERMS 

WATCH  AND  JEWELRY  REPAIRING 

Phone  WA.  5-7282  2324  Del  Paso  Blvd. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HERB  NANTZE 

CUSTOM 


BILL  HEIZER 

UPHOLSTERING 


Furniture  Manufacturing,  Recovering,  Repair 

FREE  ESTIMATES 

WA.  5-8708  1713  Del  Paso  Boulevard 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LAWRENCE  MOTORS 

WORK  CARS  THAT  WORK 
AT  A  WORKING  MAN'S  PRICE 


1517    Del    Paso    Bvd. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


WA.   5-5254 

CALIFORNIA 


THIS  AND  THAT  SHOP 

ANTIQUES  BOUGHT  AND  SOLD 

Phone  WA.  5-5145 

922  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Cle-Pro-Janser  Janitorial  Co. 

H.  C.  GEDDINGS.  Owner 

A  Complete  Home  Cleaning  Service 

FREE  ESTIMATES 


WA.  5-9553 
NORTH   SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  48 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February  1953 


MAPES  LUMBER  CO. 

LUMBER — HARDWARE 
SQUARE  DEAL  ALL  AROUND 

WAbash  5-1101                           2430  Rio  Linda  Blvd. 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

TREE  RIPE  MARKET 

GROCERIES — MEATS— PRODUCE 
POTATOES  OUR  SPECIALTY 

Phone  WA.  S-7127       2840  Lower  Marysville  Rd. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WA.  5-2892 

E.  M.  MILLER 

ELECTRICAL  SUPPLY  SHOPPE 

GIFTS  &  APPLIANCES 

1911    Del  Paso  Blvd. 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LUX  MARKET 

GROCERIES  -  MEATS 

VEGETABLES 

Phone  WA.  S-5646 

1198  EL  CAMINO  AVENUE 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

THE  WOOD  SHED 

Nursery — Plants — Bulbs 

Wood,  Fireplace   and   Kindling — Fencing 

Barbeque  Pits — Rotto-Tiller  Work 

Phone  WA.  5-5293  3264  Marysville  Road 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

HARLEM   HOT  SPOT 

BEER — EATS — POOL 

Phone  WA.  5-9730 

3545  RIO  LINDA  BLVD. 


DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS 


CALIFORNIA 


WA.  5-8802 

WALT'S  SIGNAL  SERVICE 

2400  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

EXCLUSIVE  MODERN 

REST  HOME  -  "Sans  PareU" 

WA.  5-7277 
3170  DEL  PASO  BOULEVARD 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Res.  WA.  5-0861  Phone  WA.  5-1485 

NYE'S  APPLIANCE  REPAIR 

WASHERS  -  REFRIGERATORS  -  RADIO 

Let  Your  Problems  Be  Our  Problems 

2203  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 

NORTH   SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  WA.  5-9928 

MOTEL  DEL  PASO 

HOTEL  ROOMS  and  KITCHEN  APARTMENTS 
319  E.  EL  CAMINO  AVE. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Bus.  HI.  9-5251  Res.  WA.  5-3128 

H.  G.  LATHAM  -  Plumbing 

CONTRACTING — JOBBING 

Licensed 

221   NORTH  GROVE 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

XL  STEER  &  SHEEP  FERTILIZERS 

S  &  S  FARM   SUPPLY 

Distributors 

P.  B.  FEED  &  LAWN  FEED 

Telephone  WA.  5-2842  2441   Rio  Linda  Blvd. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNI.'^ 

LAWSON   SHEET  METAL 

FURNACES 
AIR  CONDITIONING 

Phone  WA.  5-4397 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


Automobile  -  Truck  -  Tire 
Workmen's  Compensation  -  Public  Lii 


ibility 


ALLEN  BULLER 

2448  DEL  PASO  BLVD. 
Hickory  9-9591 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


.McDonald  and  his  man  burst  into  the 
flat  past  a  startled  17  year  old  boy  and 
followed  a  trail  of  blood  to  the  closet. 
There  they  found  the  fugitive,  critically 
wounded  but  still  defiant. 

Kelly  was  taken  to  the  San  Francisco 
hospital,  where  police  questioned  him  in 
regard  to  the  murders.  He  denied  any 
complicity  in  the  crimes.  A  search  of  his 
rooms  revealed  a  quantity  of  loot,  a  blood 
stained  shirt,  and  a  pair  of  black  leather 
puttees  such  as  those  used  by  the  uni- 
formed cab  drivers  of  Walter  Swanson's 
company.  Confronted  with  this  evidence 
Kelly  shrugged. 

"I'm  picked  as  a  fall  guy,"  the  suspect 
said.   "Why  should  I  say  anything?" 

"Tell  us  who  was  with  you  Monday 
night,"  McDonald  urged. 

Kelly  laughed.    "I  was  home  in  bed." 

^^'^itnesses  were  paraded  in  front  of 
both  Kelly  and  Weeks.  All  unanimously 
recognized  Kelly,  but  only  those  who 
had  been  victims  of  the  Saturday  orgy 
recognized  Weeks. 

"There  was  another  man,"  the  Mon- 
day night  victims  told  McDonald. 

Dullea,  continuing  his  questioning  of 
AVeeks,  learned  that  Kelly  had  fre- 
quented a  Third  Street  pool  room.  He 
passed  this  information  on  to  Detective 
Allan  McGinn. 

"We  raided  that  place  Saturday  and 
Monday,"  Captain  Charles  Goff  of 
Southern  station  told  him.  "However, 
we  can  try  again." 

A  number  of  suspects  were  rounded 
up  and  brought  to  McGinn  for  question- 
ing. Confronted  with  Kelly's  name,  all 
could  remember  one  significant  fact. 

"He  was  with  Mike  Papadaches  early 
Monday,"  they  reported,  "but  he  didn't 
get  into  town  until  late  Saturday  night. 
He  was  in  the  country  picking  grapes." 

A  description  of  Papadaches  fitted  per- 
fectly with  the  Monday  bandit's,  and 
McGinn,  with  Detective  Sergeant  Ire- 
dale,  visited  his  home.  7  he  18  year  old 
boy  greeted  the  detectives  in  a  bathrobe 
and  surrendered  without  a  struggle.  In- 
formed that  he  was  a  suspect  he  broke 
down  completely  and  admitted,  through 
tears,  that  he  had  participated  in  the 
Monday  night  holdups. 

"I  didn't  want  to  hurt  anybody,"  he 
sobbed.  "After  what  he  did  to  the  cab 
driver  I  wanted  to  quit,  but  he  wouldn't 
let  me.  I  was  afraid  he'd  kill  me  if  I 
ran  out." 

Papadaches  positively  identified  Kelly 
as  the  third  killer,  and,  after  talking  to 
Chief  (^'Rrien,  turned  state's  evidence. 


H.  B.  Ruben's  Welding  &  Machine 
Shop 

SPECIALISTS  IN  CAST  IRON 

Phone  WA.  5-4340 

120  ELM  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Rogers  Super  Tread  Tire  Co. 


512  S.  First   Street,  Yakima,  Wash. 


Ph.  6147 


609   W.    Bassettlaw    Ave.,    N.   Sacramento,   Calif. 
Ph.   Hickory  95640 

Telephone  WA.  5-5534 

ELITE  BEAUTY  SHOP 

HAIR  CUTTING  OUR  SPECIALTY 

116  NORTH  GROVE  AVENUE 
NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Anderson's  Frostle  &   Ice  Cream 

FOR  A  REAL  TREAT  IN  TOP  QUALITY 
Mom  and  Pop  Anderson  Greet  You 

Phone  WA.  S-8609 
312  Holden  Way  at  Del  Paso  Blvd. 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Announcing  New   Opening   in   North   Sacramento 
Nor.    Calif.    Representative    for   Atlas    Van    Lines 

Federal  Moving  &   Storage  Co, 

Office:  WA.  5-1882 — Res.  WA.  5-5866 
313  OXFORD  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

LOZON        MARKET 

Groceries   •   Lunch  Meats   •   Vegetables 

Sundries   •   Drugs    •   Beer  &  Wines 

Open  7  A.M.  to  7  P.M. — 7  to  6  Sundays 

1530  AUBURN  BLVD. — Phone  WA.  5-3265 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC  COAST  BUILDERS 

GENERAL  BUILDING  CONTRACTORS 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

LAS  PALMAS  JR.  HIGH  SCHOOL 
FOR  NORTH  SACRAMENTO 

GEORGE  D.  CROCKER  ^ 

PAINTING  CONTRACTOR 
Specializing  in  Residential  Papering  &  Painting 


Phone  WA.  5-2123 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


530  Sunset  Ave.  West 

CALIFORNIA 


Dial  WA.  5-1872 

THOMAS  FLAUS 

HOME  FOR  THE  AGED  AND  BLIND 
1032  ALAMOS  AVE. 


A 


NORTH    SACRAMENTO 


CALIFORNIA 


A  Good  Place  to  Eat 


Mixed  Drinks 


COBBLE  STONE 

Henry's  Fried  Chicken  -  Steaks  &  Sandwiches 

Dancing — Lots  of   Parking  Space  ^ 

Frank  Palagi  and  Frank  Mentessi,  Props.         fl 

AUBURN  BOULEVARD  ~ 

NORTH  SACRAMENTO         CALIFORNIA 

w.  w.  "MAC"  Mccormick 

LIVESTOCK   ORDER  BUYER 

Phone  WA.  5-2283 

2681  GROVE  AVENUE 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Free  Estimates  Phone  WA.  5-8685 

PAT  &   RAY  MOTOR  SERVICE 

COMPLETE  AUTOMOTIVE   REPAIR 

FRONT  END  ALIGNING 

112  -  8TH  STREET 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

E.  L.  MATHISEN,  D.D.S. 

DENTIST 

COMMUNIT'i'  MEDICAL  CENTER 

201   HAWTHORNE  AVENUE 

WA.  5-2771 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


LORD  AND   BISHOP 

CONTRACTING  ENGINEERS 

Phone  WA.  5-3584 

P.  O.  BOX  812 


I.hnmrx   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Pa$e  49 


PATTON   CAFE 

BEER— WINE— SANDWICHES 

Phone  WA.  5-9810 
3525  RIO  LINDA  BOULEVARD 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

WA.   S-8549  Wholesale   &  Retail 

FINANS  AUTO   SUPPLY 

AUTO  PARTS — ACCESSORIES 

N.A.Pj^.  Jobber 

Res.  HI.  9-I84I  3206  Marysville  Road 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

NORTH  CITY  GARAGE 

JOHN  TESSORE  and  GUNNY  GUNNUFSON 

Tune-Up  Specialists — Automotive  Repairs 

1731 'a  Del  Paso  Blvd.  WA.  5-6249 

NORTH    SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BILL'S   SERVICE  &   REPAIR 

GAS — OIL — ACCESSORIES 
ALL  SERVICE  GUARANTEED 


Phone  WA.  5-7577 
DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS 


3403  Rio  Linda  Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 


Height's  Drive-ln  Meat  Market 

CHOICE  MEATS 

Phone  WA.  5-7311 

3538  RIO  LINDA  BLVD. 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

Perez  House  &  Yard  Cleaning 

COMMERCIAL— RESIDENTIAL 
FREE  ESTIMATES 
Phone  WA.  5-8797 
1304  BELL  AVENUE 


DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS 


CALIFORNIA 


SMITH'S  CENTER   MARKET 

MEATS— GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 

VARIETIES — DRUG  SUPPLIES 

Phone  WA.  5-9873 

2500  GRAND  AVENUE 

DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

MARKET  CENTER 

CANNERY  SURPLUS  SALES 
SAVE  UP  TO  50%  ON  FOODSTUFFS 


3419  Rio  Linda  Blvd.. 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS 


Phone  WA.  5-0763 

CALIFORNIA 


DEL  PASO  LUMBER  CO. 

LUMBER— HARDWARE — ROOFING 

PAINTS — CEMENT 

800  Grand  Avenue   (Next  to  Fire  House) 

WA.  5-3507 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALiFORNLA 

Telephone  WA.  0442  Res.  Phone  WA.  5-2961 

FOUR  OAKS  BOTTLE  SHOP 

F.  E.  FARRELLY.  Prop. 
LIQUORS  -  TOBACCO  -  CIGARS  -  CANDY 

22ND  and  GRAND  AVENUE 
EAST  DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

JOE  W.  THOMPSON,  Owner         Dial  WA.  5-7402 

Thompson's  Upholstering  Shop 

MODERN  OR  ANTIQUES 

Repairing  and  Refinishing  -  All  Work  Guaranteed 

208  W.  FORD  RD. 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

Arden   Hardware   &  Lumber  Sales 

Complete  Line  of  Building  Supplies 
Plumbing    Supplies 
Phone  WA.  5-2338 
2105  ARDEN  WAY 

NORTH  SACRAMENUTO  CALIFORNIA 

WRIGHTS 

SELL  -  BUY  -  TRADE 

NEW  AND  USED  FURNITURE 

890  GRAND  AVENUE— WA.  5-9559 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

JOKER   BOX 

BEER — "Where  Friendly  People  Meet" 

Under  New  Management 

DICK  and  GINNY  BURKE 

Phone  WR.  5-9769  3701-03  Rio  Linda  Blvd. 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


Presented  with  ()\  erwhelniiiiK  cviilcnce 
against  the  trio,  the  San  Francisco 
County  Grand  Jur\-  indicted  them  on 
multiple  murder  charges. 

Kelly,  who  remained  defiant  to  the 
cml,  was  tried  in  December  1^26,  found 
guilty  of  three  charges  of  murder  and 
given  three  death  sentences.  Kelly 
laughted  at  the  court. 

"Hell,  you  can  only  hang  me  once," 
he  jeered. 

Weeks  entered  a  plea  of  guilty  to  the 
Pagano  murder,  also  to  grand  larceny, 
seven  robbery  counts,  and  one  for  auto 
theft.  He  was  given  a  life  sentence  for 
murder,  plus  consecutive  sentences  of  fwe 
years  each  for  robbery  and  one  to  ten 
years  for  grand  theft. 

Papadaches,  because  of  his  youth  and 
the  fact  that  he  turned  state's  evidence, 
was  allowed  to  plead  guilty  to  two  counts 
of  second  degree  robbery  and  sentenced 
to  the  California  State  Reformator\-.  At 
the  age  of  21  he  was  released  on  parole, 
but  returned  to  San  Quentin  prison  a 
short  time  later  when  he  was  arrested  on 
a  drunk  driving  charge  and  convicted  of 
parole  violation. 

Kelly  was  executed  in  San  Quentin 
prison  on  May  11,  1928,  after  his  last 
appeal  was  denied. 


PROGRESS   REPORT 

(CuntniurJ  from  page  !■/) 
that  I  aspire  to  elective  office  this  spring. 
Although  it  comes  as  an  honor  to  be  so 
mentioned,  it  is  distressing  to  note  that 
words  and  actions  given  without  parti- 
san design  should  be  construed  as  tools 
of  political  ambition. 

I  am  not  a  candidate  for  elective  office 
in  1953.  If  I  aspire  to  contribute  further 
service  to  our  city,  it  is  best  oftered  in 
the  field  to  which  I  ha\e  de\oted  the 
major  portion  of  my  life. 

It  is  the  task  of  the  police  to  protect 
the  lives  and  property  of  citizens  of  Los 
Angeles.  We  are  engaged  in  a  coura- 
geous and  worthwhile  attempt  to  honor- 
ably and  professionally  accomplish  that 
task.  It  is  not  a  thing  to  be  destroyed 
for  transient  advantage.  I  trust  the  com- 
ing election  will  not  see  the  progress  we 
ha\e  made  sacrificed  upon  the  altar  of 
selfish  purpose. 


Phone    Pollock   1 


Murry   and   Klein 


50  GRAND  CAFE  AND   BAR 

CHINESE  AND  AMERICAN  FOODS 

BOTTLE  GOODS 

14  Miles  East  of  Placerville  on  Highway  50 

POLLOCK   PINES  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  28-J-2 

HOWARD   K.  GRESHAM 

LICENSED  REAL  ESTATE  BROKER 

Lots  and   Homes 

P.  O.  Box  218 — On  Highway  50 

POLLOCK   PINES  CALIFORNIA 


H.  W.  HAENKLE 

hntallation  of 

CARPET,  LINOLEUM 

ASPHALT  TILE 

WA  5-1261 

1104  Carmelita  Avenue 

DEL   PASO  HEIGHTS,  CALIF. 


FRONTIER  CLUB 

BOB      -     JACK 

BEER  AND  DANCING 

WA  5-9893 

3625  Rio  Linda  Boulevard 

DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS,  CALIF. 


THE 
HEIGHTS  PHARMACY 

ERNEST    C.    SPINETTI 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
Sundries   -   Cosmetics   -   Gifts 

Phone  WAbash  5-5527 

3739  Rio  Linda  Boulevard 

DEL   PASO  HEIGHTS,  CALIF. 


HAGGIN-GRANT 

RADIO  ANDELECTRIC 

SERVICE 

EMMETT    HULL 

Authorized  Sales  and  Service 

ZENITH  -  PHILCO 

MOTOROLA 

Radio-Television  Repairing 

3385  Marysville  Road 
DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS,  CALIF. 


Page  50 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February    1 953 


MEET  YOUR  FRIENDS  AT 

NORTH  AVENUE  CAFE 

BETTY  E.  PECHAUER,  Owner 
DRAFT  BEER  ON  TAP— SOFT  DRINKS 

Phone  WA.  5-1277 

2149  NORTH  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


KIDDIE  LANE 

THE  COMPLETE  CHILDREN'S  STORE 

DRESSES— TOYS — SHOES — LAYETTES 
AND   BOYS'  WEAR 

Phone  WA.  S-8724 
815  GRAND  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


ALHAMBRA  FLOOR  COMPANY 

FRANK  J.  CAPACHI.  Owner 

HARDWOOD  FLOORS 

MAPLE  -  OAK 

Res.  Dial  IV.  9-3431 

Shop:   3005   BEN  ALI   AVE. 

Dial  WA.  5-7442 

WA.  5-0304 

CORBIN   LOCKER  COMPANY 

COLD  STORAGE  LOCKERS 
WHOLESALE  MEATS 


P.  O.  Box  459 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS 


CALIFORNIA 


GENE  McCAFFERY  CO. 

Gene  McCaffery 

Furniture  and  Appliances,  New  and  Used 

WE  BUY  AND  SELL 

2   Blocks   North  Jerry's  Corner 

Next  to  Vincent's  Market 

Telephone  WA.  5-1784 

3927  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


ADAMS  AND  GIRAUD 

BUILDERS.     RESIDENTIAL     &     COMMERCIAL 

R.  B.  ADAMS 
3300  Whitney — IV.  9-7407 

CHAS    OIRAUD 
3935  Birch  St. — WA.  5-0171 


DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS 


CALIFORNIA 


D.  W.  PICKENS 

BRICK  AND  STONE  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  WA.  5-1438 
3509  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

Sinks   -   Floors  Bath  Rooms  -  Store  Fronts 

Remodeling  a  Specialty 

JOHN     L.     SHOOK 

TILE  CONTRACTOR 

Ceramic  Tile 

WA.  5-8502 

2112  GRAND  AVENUE 

DEL   PASO   HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


(Continued  from  page  11 ) 
oretl  by  the  National  Safety  Council  for 
going  through  the  entire  year  of  1950 
without  a  single  traffic  fatality.  During 
1951  only  one  fatality  marred  the  record 
and  the  same  thing  happened  last  year. 
1  he  North  Sacramento  department 
had  the  first  uniformed  and  trained  civil 
defense  auxiliary  police  force  in  North- 
ern California.  The  35  members  of  the 
auxiliary  meet  twice  a  month,  and  have 
advanced  through  all  of  the  regular  civil 
defense  courses.  Now  some  of  them  are 
being  trained  in  squad  car  work,  just  in 
case  that  should  become  necessary  in  an 
emergency.  The  department  furnishes 
them  with  badges  and  hat  shields,  and 
each  of  the  35  men  has  bought  his  own 
uniform. 

I  he  auxiliary  is  so  popular  there  is  a 
permanent  waiting  list  of  men  who  want 
to  join.  But  the  department's  training 
and  other  facilities  are  not  adequate  to 
handle  a  bigger  auxiliary  at  present. 

Last  year  the  force  added  a  photo  lab- 
oratory to  its  facilities.  The  fellow  who 
does  nearly  all  of  the  printing  and  other 
dark  room  work  is  Chief  Wilson. 

Violent  deaths  are  rare  in  the  city,  and 
one  that  happened  last  year  shows  the 
department  is  just  as  happy  in  freeing  an 
innocent  man  as  in  convicting  a  guilty 
one. 

A  woman  was  found  shot  to  death  in 
a  manner  clearly  indicating  she  had  been 
murdered.  She  was  killed  by  a  shot  in 
the  abdomen  from  a  high  powered  rifle. 
No  powder  burns  were  evident  and  it 
appeared  very  unlikely  that  she  could 
have  shot  herself  because  of  the  length 
of  the  rifle.  Besides,  the  weapon  was 
several  feet  from  where  her  body  was 
found  on  the  floor  of  her  living  room, 
and  there  was  a  bullet  hole  in  the  wall 
at  such  an  angle  suicide  was  ruled  out  at 
an  early  stage. 

The  victim's  boy  friend  had  spent  the 
evening  with  her.  He  admitted  they  had 
quarreled,  and  was  jailed  as  a  suspect. 

"At  that  stage,"  Chief  AVilson  recalls, 
"convicting  him  would  have  been  a  sim- 
ple matter  of  going  to  court.  He  was 
hooked." 

But  the  investigation  went  on  because 
of  the  defendant's  insistence  that  he  had 
nothing  to  do  with  the  shooting.  And  it 
produced  results.  The  bullet  hole  in  the 
wall,  which  was  such  a  convincing  clue, 
turned  out  to  be  an  old  one,  caused  when 
the  gun  went  off  accidentally  some  weeks 
before.  The  bullet  was  found,  and  it 
had  on  it  no  flesh  particles.  An  inch  by 
inch  check  showed  another  tiny  hole  in 
the  cracked  ceiling,  which  was  where  the 
fatal  bullet  went. 


Phone  WA.  S-7558 

KING'S  JEWELERS 

In  Four  Oaks  Shopping  Center 

GUARANTEED  WATCH  REPAIRING 

Branch   Post  Office 

2138  GRAND  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

RETTAS  FOUNTAIN 

BREAKFAST — LUNCH— DINNERS 

Burgers  in  a  Basket  with  Shoestrings 

Phone  WA.  5-7503 

821   GRAND  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

Del  Paso  Heights  Hardware  Store 

GENERAL  HARDWARE 

Paints — Plumbing  Supplies 

Fishing  Tackle — Sporting  Goods — Glassware 

Phone  WA.  5-8512 

PARK  AND  GRAND  AVE. 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

WA.  5-741 1  Res.  WA.  5-5633 

TO  SELL  YOUR  PROPERTY  CALL 

CARDER  REALTY 

FARMS — RANCHES — HOMES 

George  S.  Carder — George  H.  Waugh 

Res.  WA.  5-8372 

3389  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

MEET  MR.  SPUDNUT 
Freshest  Thing  in  Town 

HILL'S  SPUDUT  SHOP 

HOME  COOKING 

SPECIAL   PRICES   FOR   PARTIES 

We  Make  Our  Own  Pies 

Phone  WA.  5-9671 

3735  MARYSVILLE  RD.  at  Jerry's  Comer 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


GIL'S  ASSOCIATED  SERVICE 

GILBERT  T.   KEPLINGER 

Phone  WA.  5-9773 
1804  NORTH  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

DEL  PASO  AUTO  SUPPLY 

L,   H.   "TIP"  TIPPITT 

Distributors  of  .  .  . 

AUTOMOTIVE  PARTS  -  ACCESSORIES 

GOODYEAR  TIRES  -  HOOD  TIRES 

Norwalk  Gasoline 

WA.  5-7383 
901    GRAND 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS 


1 


CALIFORNIA 


Arden  Town   Richfield   Service 

TIRES    •    BATTERIES   •    AUTO  ACCESSORIES 

PICK  UP  AND  DELIVERY 

We  Give  Cash  Checks 


Phone  IV.  9-1915 
FAIROAKS  BLVD.  &  WATT  AVE. 

ARDEN    TOWN  CALIFORNIA* 


I\hrunry    1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  51 


BERNIE  MOULTON 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTOR 

Tel.  WA.  5-6640 
3717  MAHOGANY  STREET 

DED   PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  WA.  S-I797 

HALL-BURDETTE 

NORTON  MORTORCYCLES 

"World's  Best  Roadholder" 

AND  THE  AMBASSADOR  LIGHTWEIGHT 

1138  BELL  AVENUE 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


FARMERS   HARDWARE 

A  Complete  Hardware  Store 

WA.   S-0906 

3736  MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

DEL  PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


JACK  V.  UNDEN.  JR. 

GENERAL  BUILDING  CONTRACTOR 
"Live  in  a  House  That  Jack  Built" 

Tel.  WA.  5-2973 
5109   16TH  STREET 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


WA.  5-3909 


WA.  5-7231 


Bellview  Sand   &   Gravel   Co. 

Drain  Rock  -  Plaster  Sand  -  Fill  Dirt 

Fill  Sand  -  Decomposed  Granite 

All  Kinds  of  Crushed  Rock  -  Good  Top  Soil 

Prompt,  Courteous   Service 

J.  M.   (TEX)   PIERCE,  Owner 

4333  -  24TH  STREET 

DEL    PASO    HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


SACRAMENTO  TILE  CO. 

INSTALLATION  AND  REPAIRING 

WYLIE  E.  SHOEMAKER 

SAMUEL  E.  EDENS 

M.  F.  KUHLMAN 

1713  NOGALES  STREET 

Phone  WA.  5-8606 

DEL   PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


LARSON'S  SHELL  SERVICE 

THERE'S  A  REASON  WHY  THEY 
ALL  STOP  AT  LARSON'S 

WAbash  S-9760 

3801   MARYSVILLE  ROAD 

Corner  of  Grand 

DEL   PASO  HEIGHTS  CALIFORNIA 


HODGE  PLUMBING  SERVICE 

IVanhoe  9-1507 
3944  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


1  lu"  ileath  was  CDiiclusiveh  e.stablishetl 
as  a  suicide  aiul  the  defendant  was  re- 
leased. 

Wilson's  main  hobb\  is  flying  his 
small,  two  place  Luscomb  plane.  His 
ability  as  a  pilot  has  come  in  handy 
numerous  times  in  the  police  depart- 
ment's work. 

Percy  Gas.so\va\'  is  the  assistant  chief 
of  the  department.  1  he  other  officers 
are  Jack  Raacor,  Walter  Land,  Pete 
Rineberg,  Ben  Bruno,  Ra\  Rhodes  and 
Dean  Jones. 


PERSONAL  IDENTIFICATION 

( l'iiiUinui\l  frum  pui/r  21  j 
the  records  in  I'^Ob,  and  to  the  conse- 
quent creation  and  development  of  a  fin- 
gerprint file  that  for  some  years  was  the 
largest  in  the  west.  Caldwell  asserts  that, 
like  some  others,  he  too  had  found  an 
earlier  interest  in  Mark  Twain's  notable 
storv,  "Fudd'nhead  Wilson." 

Harry  H.  Caldwell  was  pensioned 
from  the  service  in  1932,  after  a  period 
of  nearly  three  decades  devoted  to  the 
furtherance  of  modern  methods  in  crimi- 
nology, and,  during  that  time,  the  Oak- 
land department  was  directed  by  a  num- 
ber of  different  chiefs;  some  of  whom 
had  little  interest  in  scientific  advance- 
ment. Caldwell  relates  an  amusing 
though  lamentable  episode  of  his  return 
from  an  unusually  important  convention 
of  the  International  Association  for 
Identification,  in  which  at  various  times 
he  held  many  offices  and  of  which  he  was 
eventually  made  Dean  Emeritus. 

On  this  especial  occasion,  the  organi- 
zation, largely  through  Caldwell's  ef- 
forts, had  accomplished  the  enactment 
of  certain  national  legislation  particu- 
larly favorable  to  the  interests  of  law- 
enforcement,  and  the  related  events  had 
been  widely  publicized  by  the  press: 
Caldwell's  name  and  preeminence  were 
blazoned  upon  the  first  page  of  every 
journal  from  coast  to  coast.  Upon  re- 
porting for  duty,  he  was  met  at  the  sta- 
tion by  the  current  chief,  whom  Cald- 
well greeted  respectfully,  voicing  a  hope 
that  the  commendatory  newspaper  stor- 
ies, inevitably  reflecting  credit  to  the 
entire  department  and  its  head  executi\e, 
had  met  with  his  superior's  approval. 
The  chief  grudgingly  admitted  the  fa- 
vorable recognition,  but  added,  "Those 
fellows  (meaning  the  identification  ex- 
perts) are  all  fakers;  you  know  that  as 
well  as  I  do." 

Intolerance  Encountered 

Such  bigotry  displayed  by  the  leading 
official  of  a  large  metropolitan  organiza- 
tion offers  some  indication  of  the  igno- 
rant intolerance  encountered  by  those 
who   champion   progress.     However,    the 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

D.  B.   RASMUSSEN,   D.D.S. 

Phone  IV.  9-6753 

5805   MARCONI   AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

OLIVE    INN 

MEALS    •    BEER    •    WINE 

Phone  IV.  9-3398 

3001  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

For  Fine  Papering  and  Painting  Call  .  .  . 

CHET    PALMER 

Phone  IV.  9-7089 

6380  SUTTER  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

HURST     REALTY 

REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 

Featuring   Acreages   -   Small    Ranches 

Telephones — Office:  IV.  9-7666;  Res.  IV.  9-3556 

2733  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

RUSSEL  L.   FILLNER 

CUSTOM  BUILDER  OF  QUALITY 
RANCH  AND  MODERN  HOMES 

Phone  IV.  9-6873 
4821    FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

O.    C.    BREILING 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  IVanhoe  9-0152 

1950  MISSION  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

REAL  HOME  COOKED  CHINESE  FOOD 

SUN    AR    CAFE 

ORDERS  PUT  UP  TO  TAKE  OUT 

IVanhoe  9-2553 
FAIR  FOOD  MARKET  BUILDING 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


BERKAN  &  CLARK 

Sheet  Metal 

Carl   Clark  —  Res.    HI.    5-8288 

Rocco  Berkan — Res.  IV.  9-3510 

LENNOX    AIRFLO   HEATING 
Ventilation    •     Air  Conditioning 

Shop  Phone  IV.  7-1812 

4816  FAIR  OAKS  BVLD. 

Carmichael,  California 


CARMICHAEL  GARAGE 

JACK  KENNEY 

UNITED  MOTORS  SERVICE 

Complete  Auloniotive  Service 

Tuneups  and  Brakes  a  Specialty 

Phone  IV.  9-8327 

5808  MARCONI  AVENUE 

Carmichael,  California 


Page  52 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


I'cliruary  1953 


TRIANGLE  RANCH   SUPPLY 

FELIX    HENSIIAW 
FEED  •   HARDWARE   •  SADDLE  SUPPLIES 

Phone  IVanhoe  7-0754 
3932  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

CARMICHAEL 
Upholstering  &   Mattress  Co. 

Mattresses  Remade    •    Box  Springs 

Furniture  Upholstered    •   Trailer  Cushions 

N. PAYNE 

ALL  WORK  GUARANTEED 

Phone  IV.  9-6443 

4149  GARFIELD  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

JENNY    WREN 
Nursery  School 

MRS.  ALBERT  WIEDERHOLD,  Director 

Stories,  music,  creative  and  dramatic   play,  play 

and    finger    painting,    rhythm    band,    folk    games. 

Full  day  program,  hot  lunch,  individual  nap  cots. 

MONDAY  THROUGH  FRIDAY 

AGES:  3  TO  5 

IV.  7-2929 

6216  KENNETH  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


CARMICHAEL  JEWELER 

WATCH  REPAIRING  AT  ITS  FINEST 
DEALER  FOR  WYLER  WATCHES 

CARMICHAEL  SHOPPING  CENTER 

Phone  IV.  7-2418 

Box  532 


CARMICHAEL 


CALIFORNIA 


OTTO'S  SPORT  SHOP 

Fishing   Tackle    •    Bait    •    Guns    •    Ammunition 

Sporting  Goods  •   Bicycle  Accessories 

Toys    •    Wallets    •   Gifts 

LICENSES   •   FREE  CAMPFIRE  PERMITS 

Open  Friday  Evening  Til  9  P.M. 

Phone  IV.  7-0641 
2910  FAIR  OAKS  BLVD.  AT  MARCONI  AVE. 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


ERNIE     MERRILL'S 

MOBILGAS   •   MOBIL  TIRES  &  ACCESSORIES 

"If  You  Get  Good  Service  Remember 
Where  You  Got  It" 

Phone  IV.  9-9919 
3049  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


CARMICHAEL  PHARMACY 

Next  to  R&H  Hardware 

Phone  IV.  9-3724 
2947  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

ACTION    STAMPS 

PATRONIZE  YOUR  ACTION  STAMP  DEALER 

Phone  IV.  9-723S 

6036  LANDIS 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


annals  of  mankind  have  been  expurgated 
by  time's  cleansing  touch,  and  the  petty 
personalities  of  temporary  tyrants  are 
deleted  from  the  record ;  whereas,  for 
those  who  sacrificed  personal  interest  in 
the  welfare  of  humanity,  destiny  reserves 
a  lasting  laurel. 

Always  to  be  remembered  are  those 
fearless  leaders  who  had  advanced  the 
precepts  of  science,  but  the  field  of  per- 
sonal identification  probably  owes  its 
largest  debt  to  August  Vollmer,  retired 
Professor  of  Police  Administration  at 
the  University,  of  California,  and  ac- 
knowledged world  leader  in  all  branches 
of  criminology.  Through  nearly  half  a 
century  of  tireless  effort,  his  versatile 
genius  has  largely  been  the  cause  of  uni- 
versal appreciation  for  the  use  of  science 
in  society's  warfare  against  crime,  and 
has  earned  him  the  well-deserved  title  of 
"Father  of  Modern  Police  Methods." 

Progressive  Policies 

It  was  an  important  event  in  the  civic 
annals  of  Berkele\'  when  August  Voll- 
mer was  elected  to  the  post  of  Town 
Marshal  in  1905.  His  progressive  poli- 
cies at  once  brought  about  marked  ad- 
vancement in  the  city's  administrative 
and  executive  program,  and,  in  1909,  his 
appointment  to  the  position  of  Chief  of 
Police  offered  freer  scope  for  the  devel- 
opment of  an  organization  that  was  des- 
tined to  become  an  international  stand- 
ard of  excellence. 

Fully  appreciative  of  fingerprint  util- 
ity, Vollmer  lost  no  time  in  adopting 
the  method.  He  writes  that  the  first  per- 
son to  be  thus  recorded  in  the  Berkeley 
Bureau  was  one  Frank  Snow,  amusingly 
enough,  a  drug  addict,  whose  impressions, 
made  in  December  1907,  upon  an  unpre- 
pared sheet  of  white  paper,  are  still  pre- 
served in  the  police  archives.  Vollmer 
also  asserts  that  almost  with  the  bureau's 
inception,  the  identification  of  a  much 
wanted  but  at  first  unrecognized  confi- 
dence man,  through  submitting  his  fin- 
gerprints to  an  eastern  bureau  for  search, 
amply  illustrated  the  system's  efficiency, 
dispelling  whatever  doubts  may  have  lin- 
gered in  the  minds  of  other  civic  execu- 
tives. 

Captain  Clarence  D.  Lee,  a  co-worker 
with  Vollmer,  had  been  placed  in  charge 
of  the  records  in  1906,  and  the  kindred 
interests  of  Vollmer,  Lee,  Caldwell,  De 
Pue,  and  certain  other  progressi\es,  led 
to  the  advocation  of  a  state  identification 
bureau  to  serve  as  a  clearing  house  for 
fingerprint  records  sent  from  all  Califor- 
nia law  enforcement  agencies.  Such  a 
proposal  was  duly  introduced  before  the 
state  legislature  in  1907,  but,  although 
gaining  a  majority  approval  by  that  body. 


WALTER  N.  HOWE  1 

GENERAL  BUILDING  CONTRACTOR         ^ 

Telephone  IV.  9-0542 

5117  KOVANDA  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


ROEDIGER  &   ROBINSON 

CEMENT  CONTRACTORS 

Phone  IV.  9-2741 
3920  HOLLISTER  AVENUE 

NORTH   CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

ROBERT  E.  GRANT  I 

PLASTERING  CONTRACTOR  ^ 

QUALITY  PLASTERING  AT 
REASONABLE  PRICES 

Telephone  IV?-hoe  9-4057 
3912  BRYANS  WAY 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


LEW    HARRIS 

TILE — Linoleum,  Rubber,  Asphalt,  Cork 

and  Metal   Wall  Tile 

INLAID  LINOLEUM  •  PRINT  LINOLEUM 

IV.  9-1021 
6221  Vi  FAIR  OAKS  BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


DURO-BILT  HOMES  CO. 

Specializing  in  Custom  Built  Homes 
FREE  ESTIMATES  GIVEN 

Phone  IV.  7-2219 

5532  WHITNEY  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 

MARCONI    PALMS 

FRANCES  I.  ANDERSON,  Owner 

MILD-MENTAL  AND  NERVOUS  DISEASES 
PSYCHIATRISTS  ON  CALL 

Phone  IV.  9-3542 
4932  MARCONI  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


ROY    S.    REED 

BUILDER  OF  DISTINCTIVE  HOMES 

All  Types  of  Commercial 
and   Home  Construction 

Telephone  IVanhoe  9-4635 
6930  SUTTER  AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


PAT-KATH   BOXER  KENNELS 

CHAMPION  BLOODLINES 

HARRY  JONES  &  WALTER  MERKSAMER 

Puppies  for  Sale    •   A.K.C.  Registered 
Stud  Service 

2416  WALNUT  AVENUE 
CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


Fch, 


1053 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  53 


FLORIN    CLEANERS 

N.  B.  CALIVA,  Owner  and  Operator 

LAUNDRY  AND  ALTERATION  SERVICE 
We  Call  for  and  Deliver 

P.  O.  BOX   128 — HI.  7-4079 

FLORIN  CALIFORNIA 


EDGE  CREEK   GOAT  DAIRY 

SACRAMENTO  COUNTY'S 
ONLY   LICENSED  GOAT  DAIRY 

Telephone  IVanhoe  9-2580 
6933  FAIROAKS  BLVD. 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


McCOMAS   LUMBER  SALES 

WE  SELL  LUMBER — 
DIRECT  FROM  MILL  TO  YOU 


Phone  IV.  7-2263 

SI2S  FAIROAKS  BOULEVARD 

at  Arden  Way 

CARMICHAEL  CALIFORNIA 


McLAYS    GARAGE 

GENERAL  REPAIRING 
WELDING   •   MACHINE  WORK 


Hlllcrest  7-4083 

FLORIN  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  HI.  7-0656 


S.  W.  SUNZERI 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTOR 


Route  1,  Box  2200 
FLORIN,  CALIFORNIA 


Hlllcrest  7-0092 

Compliments 
of 

LESLIE  C.  LANDON 
Lumber 

P.  O.  BOX  133 
Florin,  California 


the    current    governor's    veto    killed    the 
measure. 

Bill  Passes 

But  Vollnier  and  his  able  confreres 
were  not  of  the  type  who  tamely  submit 
to  opposition,  however  dishearteniii};. 
\  ear  after  year,  the  project  was  repeat- 
edly introduced  before  every  subsequent 
state  administration,  until  1918,  when 
the  bill  was  finally  passed,  creating  the 
much-needed  central  bureau  in  the  Cali- 
fornia State  Capitol  at  Sacramento.  This 
successful  crusade,  led  by  Chief  Voll- 
mer  and  his  followers,  like  many  of  his 
other  signal  enterprises,  deserves  the 
highest  commendation. 

Despite  the  spread  of  appreciation  for 
fingerprinting  in  the  United  States,  com- 
paratively few  technical  books  were  writ- 
ten on  the  subject,  primarily.  "Finger- 
prints, 1  heir  Identitication  and  L^ses," 
by  Frederick  A.  Brayley,  printed  in 
1910,  seems  to  have  been  the  first,  while 
"Finger  Print  Instructor,"  by  Frederick 
Kuhne,  and  published  in  1916,  was  the 
only  early  American  text  to  attain  gen- 
eral recognition.  "Finger  Prints  Simpli- 
fied," offered  some  years  later  by  James 
Holt,  although  a  useful  work,  failed  to 
gain  any  considerable  popularity,  and 
other  sporadic  outputs  by  various  writers 
enjoyed  only  transient  notice  with  the 
exception  of  "Personal  Identification,  " 
by  Prof.  Harris  H.  AVilder  and  Bert 
AVentworth.  This  authoritative  work, 
dealing  with  the  identification  field  more 
generally,  was  considered  both  practical 
ami  inclusive.  However,  even  this  con- 
tribution furnished  little  historical  data 
and  tendered  no  systemic  improvements 
or  extensions  of  the  fundamental  Galton- 
Henry  principles;  the  original  text  by  Sir 
E.  R.  Henry,  "Classification  and  L^ses 
of  Finger  Prints,  "  published  in  1900  in 
England,  continued  to  be  preferred  by 
students. 

Transition  Period 

Obviously,  it  would  be  futile  to  fur- 
nish a  chronological  list  of  the  dates  and 
places  when  fingerprints  were  installed 
by  the  various  states  and  cities  of  Amer- 
ica, although  it  would  seem  appropriate 
to  offer  some  few  of  the  more  significant 
and  representative  circumstances.  The 
pioneer  work  of  Ferrier  inspired  a  large 
number  of  students,  who,  later,  as  teach- 
ers, imparted  information  to  many  oth- 
ers, but  the  New  "'l  ork  Police  School  of 
Criminology,  conducted  by  Joseph  Fau- 
rot,  as  an  enduring  organization,  pro- 
vided instruction  for  more  scholars, 
many  of  whom  came  from  distant  parts 
to  attend  classes. 

Slowly  at  first,   but  sureh',  the  use  of 


KARA'S  DRIVE-IN   MARKET 

MEATS  •   GROCERIES    •    VEGETABLES 
DRY  GOODS 

EVERYTHING  UNDER  ONE  ROOM 

Phone  HI.  6-8602 

FLORIN  CALIFORNIA 


DAVE'S    MARKET 


FLORIN 


Phone  HI.  5-0092 
P.  O.  BOX  106 


CALIFORNIA 


Specializing  in  Construction  Repair 

FLORIN     WELDING 

AUTOMATIC  HARD  SURFACING 

ART  DUNTON  AND  GID  SCHNAIDT 

HUnter    6-2764 

FLORIN  CALIFORNIA 

THE  ALOHA  MOTEL 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  A.  Shuren,  Proprietors 

ALL  MODERN  -  AIR  CONDITIONED 

Box  210,  Route  1 — Hlllcrest  7-2503 

y^  Mile  So.  of  Sacramento  City  on  Highway  99 

FLORIN CALIFORNIA 

RANCH   FRUIT  MARKET 

FRESH  FRUITS  YEAR  AROUND 
Home  Cured  Olives  of  All  Kinds 

Phone  HI.  5-5991 

PERKINS  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  HI.  6-6655 

ACE  AUTO  WRECKERS 

FOLSOM   BLVD.  AT  PERKINS 
FULL  HOUSE  OF  PARTS 

VIRGIL  HARRIS— BOX   193 
PERKINS CALIFORNIA 

TOM'S  TRAILER   EXCHANGE 

3'2    Miles   East   of   Perkins,   North  Side   U.  S.  50 

We  Pay  Cash  for  House  Trailers-Sell  Easy  Terms 

Hlllcrest  7-5185 — P.  O.  Box  196 

PERKINS CALIFORNIA 

PERKINS    AIRPORT 

CHINCHILLA  RANCH 

DUKE  HARBAUCH 
HI.  6-2471 


CALIFORNIA 


I  ire  Repairs 


Phone  HI.  6-4514 


PERKINS  TIRE  SERVICE 

C.  E,  KERSE"!'    •    HARRY  V.  YATES 
COMPLETE  TIRE  SERVICE 

FOLSOM  BOULEVARD 

PERKIN.S  CALIFORNIA 


COLOMA    STORE 

At  the  Base  of  Marshall's 
Monument 

GROCERIES    -    LUNCHES 
BEER  AND  WINE 

Allen  and  Bertha  Mae  Combs 

Phone  Placerville  150-R-2 
COLOMA,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  54 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February  1953\ 


Phone  607-J 

W.  E.  CARNAHAN 

ASPHALT,  TILE.  CARPET  AND 

LINOLEUM  LAYING  -  FLOOR  SANDING 

"Kentile  Asphalt  Tile" 

HIGHWAY  SO  EAST 

Opposite  Gold  Trail  Motor  Lodge 

P.  O.  Box  924 

PLACER  VILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  799-J 


ALBERT  SIMON 

"THE  QUALITY  SHOP" 
.  .  .  Quality  First  .  .  . 

379  MAIN  STREET 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


RUPLEY    BROS. 

LOGGING  CONTRACTOR 

Telephone  237 
P.  O.  Box  271 

0>ie  and  One-Half  Miles  North 
of  Camino 

PLACERVILLE,  CALIFORNIA 
•- ~. 

JOE   VI  C I NI 

Contractor 

EARTH  MOVING 

LAND  LEVELING 

LAND  CLEARING 

HAULING 

All  Modern  Equipment 
114  Miles  West  of  Placerville  on 

HIGHWAY   50 

P.  O.  BOX  206 

Telephone  100 


the  system  was  extended,  as  earnest  ad- 
vocates carried  the  teachings  to  all  parts 
of  the  country;  and  here  and  there  some 
enterprising  and  forceful  figure  attained 
more  than  passing  repute.  A.  J.  Reno, 
an  active  participant  in  the  enforcement 
field,  toolc  up  the  study  of  fingerprinting 
in  1905,  shortly  thereafter  introducing 
the  method  in  the  Illinois  State  Reforma- 
tory and  also  in  the  .Mi^inesota  State 
Penitentiary,  in  1908.  Reno  featured 
prominently  through  that  transitional 
period,  and  held  office  in  the  identifica- 
tion experts'  organization,  later  adding 
his  eftorts  to  secure  the  passage  of  legal 
measures  that  proved  exceedingly  helpful 
to  the  identification  program. 

Years  Pay  Tribute 
The  passing  years  pay  their  tribute  to 
all  those  worthy  leaders  of  the  earlier 
ilays  in  identification  development,  and 
modern  recognition  agrees  that  few  con- 
tributed so  generously  as  did  Bert  Went- 
worth,  alreadv  mentioned  as  coauthor 
with  Prof.  H.  H.  Wilder.  ^Vhile  Police 
Commissioner  in  Dover,  New  Hamp- 
shire, he  brought  fingerprinting  to  the 
police  department  of  that  city  in  1906, 
and,  until  his  death  in  1938,  the  under- 
taking of  law  enforcement  occupied  a 
major  portion  of  his  activities.  As  writer, 
lecturer,  and  identification  expert  of  the 
highest  caliber,  his  career  was  both  bril- 
liant and  productive.  A  kindly  and  just 
administration  marked  his  period  of  of- 
fice in  judicial  capacity,  and  while  he 
was  a  representative  of  the  State  Legis- 
lature, the  ratification  of  a  bill  which  he 
introduced  abolished  capital  punishment 
in  the  State  of  New  Hampshire  in  1931. 

International  Association 

The  Twentieth  Century's  first  decade 
witnessed  the  wide  spreading  of  enlight- 
enment by  those  mentioned  educators 
and  their  various  associates,  although  the 
period  from  1910  to  1914  probably  saw 
the  most  progress.  Rut  the  succeeding 
vears  beheld  a  world  torn  by  conflict  that 
left  small  consideration  for  aught  save 
"wars  and  rumors  of  wars."  However, 
despite  unfavorable  conditions,  by  1915, 
the  number  of  identification  experts  in 
the  United  States  had  increased  greatly, 
and  resulted  in  the  "International  Asso- 
ciation for  Criminal  Identification,"  or- 
ganized in  Oakland,  California,  with 
Harry  H.  Caldwell  as  the  fraternity's 
first  president.  The  word  "criminal" 
was  later  eliminated  from  the  title,  and 
the  membership  expanded  to  include  ren- 
resentatives  in  every  country  in  the 
world. 

T  he  promiscuous  and  indiscriminate 
methods  commonly  employed  in  the  se- 
lection   of    American    police    officers    ac- 


Phone  520 

ATWOOD  INSURANCE  AGENCY 

TED   ATWOOD 

FIRE  -  LIABILITY  -  LIFE  &  ACCIDENT 
INSURANCE 

429  MAIN  STREET 

PLACERVILLE CALIFORNIA. 

Phone  472 


HUNSAKER'S 

FURNITURE  AND  APPIANCES 

438  MAIN  STREET 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


IVY     HOTEL 

AND  COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

Dining  Room  and  Counter  Remodeled 

Specializing  in  Fine  Foods 

TED  BECKER.  Owner-Manager 


PLACERVILLE 


CALIFORNIA, 


Phone  361  P.  Ville 

ORELLI   ELECTRIC  CO. 

SALES  &  SERVICE 

Refrigeration  -  Electrical  Contracting 

Motor  Repairing  -  Rewinding 

166  BROADWAY 
P.  O.  Box  912 

PLACERVILLE CALIFORNIA  . 

PONY  EXPRESS  STEAK  HOUSE 

Featuring 

CHICKEN  AND  STEAK  DINNERS 

Under  New  Management 

EL  DORADO  Y,  HIGHWAY  50 

6  Miles  West   of 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


RAFFLES  HOTEL 

PONY  EXPRESS  ROUTE 
TO  LAKE  TAHOE 


(Old   Hangtown) 
PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phones:  1000  or  1010 


STOPFER   REAL  ESTATE 

Glenn  E.  Stoffer 

LICENSED  BROKER 

BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES 


PLACERVILLE 


CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  161 

JAMES    P.    MORTON 
CONSTRUCTION  CO. 

James  P.  Morton 

33  CLAY  STREET 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


I.hniarv  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  55 


THE   BOOTERY 

PAT  and  ALICE  HARRIS 
EMPIRE  THEATRE  BUILDING 

PLACER\  ILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  334 

ENZLER'S  BAKERY 

CAKES  FOR  ALL  OCCASIONS 

582  MAIN  STREET 

PLACERMLLE  CALIFORNIA 

BUTCH'S  QUALITY  MARKETS 

MEATS — FISH — POULTRY 

P  &  M — Phone  750  Drive-In — Phone  723 

L  &  M — Lake  Tahoe      Phone  TLC  54-J 

Delicatessen  Open  Sundays — 115  Main 

PLArER\ILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  44R3 

W.  J.  Smith  Machine  Shop  &  Motor 
Rebuild 

Crankshafts   Ground — Cylinder  Re-Boring — Line 
Boring  Connecting  Rods  and  Inserts  Re-Babbited 

ROUTE  2,  BOX  44 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

COCHRAN'S  PIANO  SHOP 

REGISTERED  PIANO  TUNING.  REBUILDING 
Grands,  Spinets.  Uprights — Sales.  Rentals 

922  Lincoln  Way,  Auburn — -Phone  1435-W 

P.  O.  Box  346 — Phone  754-W 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  131  Greyhound  Bus  Station 

ELLA'S 

INN— COM— PEAR— ABLE 
88  Lower  Main  Street 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


BOOM  AND   SNOW 

HOME  AND  AUTO  SUPPUES 

Automobile  Parts  and  Accessories  -  Oil  -  Tires 

Batteries  -  Household  Appliances  -  Camp  Goods 

ADMIRAL  Radios  -  Televisions  -  Refrigerators 

Radio  Service  and  Sales 

450  MAIN  STREET 
PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  402 


Plocervllle  Garbage  Company 

Lee  Rohrer 

GARBAGE  AND  RUBBISH  DISPOSAL 
SEPTIC  TANK  AND  CESSPOOL  SERVICE 


121   BROADWAY 


PLACERNILLE 


CLIFORMA 


Phone  274 


ELVIRA  A.  MILES 

LICENSED  REAL  ESTATE  BROKER 

BUSINESS  OPPORTUNITIES 
INSURANCE  -  NOTARY  PUBUC 

HIGHWAY  SO  WEST 

PLACERVILLE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  11-10 


KELLY'S  GROCERY  &   MARKET 

GROCERIES  -  FRESH  MEATS  -  FRUITS 
VEGETABLES 

Free  Delivery 


PLACERVILLE 


CALIFORNIA 


count  for  the  slower  acceptance  of  finger- 
printing in  the  United  States,  as  com- 
pared with  Great  Britain,  her  colonies, 
and  Austria,  Germany,  Sweden,  and  the 
Argentine  Republic.  But  the  advance  of 
the  'Fwcntieth  Century,  enforcement 
men  from  New  \"ork;  to  San  Francisco 
were  viewing  anthropometry  with  acute 
distrust;  even  to  the  tardiest  discernment 
must  finally  heed  the  urging  of  dissatis- 
faction. 

One  of  the  most  pretentious  projects 
ever  undertaken  by  man  was  exca\ation 
of  the  Panama  Canal,  and  here  again 
engineers  and  other  technicians  encount- 
ered the  problem  of  personal  identifica- 
tion so  pertinent  to  large  industrial  ven- 
ture. In  1905,  the  Isthmian  Canal  Com- 
mission solicited  advice  and  information 
from  officials  of  the  New  York  State 
Prison  Department.  Only  a  few  short 
years  prior  to  that  time,  such  a  request 
would  ine\itably  have  evoked  a  glowing 
eulogy  and  recommendation  of  anthro- 
pometry, but  Bertillon's  temporary  ex- 
pedient had  relinquished  its  place  in  the 
sun,  and  without  reservation  the  New 
York  experts  stipulated  that  identifica- 
tion by  fingerprints  should  be  emploved 
in  that  colossal  and  important  enterprise. 

Although  California  was  one  of  the 
first  states  to  create  a  centralized  file, 
others  soon  came  into  being  throughout 
America.  In  some  instances  their  incep- 
tion was  modest,  but  the  element  of  in- 
itiative was  ever  present,  as  exemplified 
in  the  state  of  Michigan,  where  shortly 
after  the  beginning  of  the  First  ^Vorld 
War,  Capt.  I.  H.  Marmon,  of  the  De- 
troit Police  Department,  started  the 
State  Bureau  with  a  collection  of  finger- 
prints which  he  had  previously  been  fil- 
ing in  a  shoe  box. 

Some  years  were  required  for  the  birth 
of  statutes  creating  state  bureaus  in  the 
various  sections.  The  State  Bureau  of 
Identification  of  Pennsylvania  came  into 
existence  with  the  passage  of  an  Act  of 
Assembly  dated  and  approved  April  27, 
1937,  although,  for  some  time  previously, 
the  State  Police  had  maintained  a  bureau 
of  identification.  The  law  not  only  es- 
tablished the  central  registry,  but  also 
required  municipal  police  to  furnish 
copies  of  prints  to  the  State  in  all  felony 
cases,  and  authorized  district  attorneys 
of  the  several  counties  to  employ  finger- 
print experts.  At  least  twelve  state  iden- 
tification bureaus  existed  in  the  U.  S.  in 
1928;  by  1938,  the  number  had  in- 
creased to  thirty-four.  South  Dakota's 
bureau  was  established  .July  1,  1933,  and 
New  Mexico's  in  1935,  while  Maine's 
central  registry  was  created  March  31, 
1937. 

One  of  the  first  private  civil  identifi- 
cation bureaus  to  be  initiated  in  the  East 


Phone  57 

STERLING  LUMBER  CO. 

COMPLETE  BUILDING  NEEDS 

Charles  and  Chapel  Streets 

PLACERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone   1045 

EL  DORADO   MOTEL 

AIR  CONDITIONED— PANEL  RAY  HEAT 

SOUND  PROOFED — MEMBER  AAA 

ONE  HALF  MILE  EAST  OF 

PLACERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone  42 

MOTHER   LODE  GLASS  CO. 

PLATE— STRUCTURAL— AUTO  GLASS 
"Bring  Us   Your  Glass  Problems" 


PLACERVILLE 


CALIFORNIA 


BEN  FRANKLIN... 5c  and  70c  Store 

GREETINGS  EXTENDED  TO 
PEACE  OFFICERS  OF  EL  DORADO  COUNTY 
BUD  GARLICK,  Owner 
Phone  3-R-I 

Karlsen's    Motel    and    CofFee    Shop 

"QUIET  IN  THE  PINES" 

5  Miles  East  of  Placerville,  Highway  50 

ROUTE     I.    BOX    550      PLACERVILLE.    CALIF. 

Connie  Geyer's  Associated 
Service 

MAIN  AND  CANAl, 
Phone  163 

PLACERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone  50Jl 

SQUARE  DEAL  GARAGE 

Jack  I.  Lowe,  Prop. 
GENERAL  AUTO  REPAIRING 

ELDORADO CALIFORNIA 

Phone  48-R-3 


COZY  INN  CAFE 

JOE  —  PAZ 

ONE-FOURTH  MILE  EAST  OF 
ELDORADO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments   of 

F.  M.  NORTH  MACHINE  SHOP 

P.  O.  BOX  38 

Phone  257 

SMITH   FLAT CALIFORNIA 

Phone  669-W 

"The  Place  to  Refresh" 

DAVENPORT  CAFE 

BEER— WINE— LIQUORS  AND  FOOD 

CAMINO CALIFORNIA 

EL   DORADO  ELECTRIC 

JAMES  F.   TILL,  Prop. 

Featuring 

HOT  POINT  and  PHILCO  PRODUCTS 

TELEVISION 

Commercial  and  Residential  Wiring 

P.  O.  Box  505 

Phone  Placerville  24-J-l 

CAMINO CALIFORNIA 

Phone  50-R-l 


ED.  H.  SHINN 

CATS  -   CARYALLS   -  GRADING 
GRAVELING 


P.  O.  Box  93 


EL   DORADO 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  56 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Fch 


'  ciiruarf 


1953 


FERGUSON  TRACTOli 


•Sales 
\i^  •  Parts 
•  Service 


WE  RENT  WE  SELL 

SCHRAMM  COMPRESSORS 

GROWERS  TRACTOR 
&  IMPLEMENT  CO. 

Phone  HI.  7-9888 

5925  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

Sacramento  California 


Hinkey  -  Dinkey 

Glenn  Watkins 
Vic  Stefani 

PACKAGE  LIQUORS 
MIXED  DRINKS 

HI.  5-9890 

3818  Stockton  Blvd. 
Sacramento  California 


Southside  Club 

"Where  Good  Friends  Meet" 

The  Best  Tap  Beer  in  Toun 
Phone  HI.  5-9483 

3909  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

Stockton  California 


M  A  TT  '  S 

Norwalk  Service 

Specialized  Lubrication 

Your  Mileage  Recorded 
We  Ciive  and  Redeem  Movie  Stamps 
TIRES,  BATTERIES  &  ACCESSORIES 

PICKUP  &  DELIVERY 

Phone  HU.  6-4714 

4200  STOCKTON  BLVD. 

Sacramento  California 


was  established  at  Philadelphia  in  1924 
by  Harry  J.  Myers,  a  criminologist  of 
that  city.  He  is  also  accredited  with  the 
installation  of  the  footpriiiting  of  infants 
in  Pennsylvania  hospitals  in  1925.  Dur- 
ing that  year,  the  municipal  court  at 
Philadelphia  witnessed  a  perplexing  epi- 
sode in  the  puzzling  Steimling-Selknitter 
case  involving  a  pair  of  newborn  infants 
"mixed"  by  hospital  attendants.  Judge 
MacNeille,  who  presided,  was  so  in- 
censed by  the  unnecessary  confusion  of 
identity,  that  he  sponsored  a  bill  before 
the  State  Legislature  calling  for  a  com- 
pulsory foot-and-fingerprint  law  to  apply 
in  all  maternity  wards  and  hospitals  in 
the  state.  The  measure  was  agitated  by 
Myers  and  other  progressives,  and  on 
April  29,  1925,  was  signed  by  Governor 
Gifford  Pinchot.  Following  this,  Harry 
J.  Myers  writes  that  he  was  called  to  in- 
stall his  system  in  over  a  score  of  insti- 
tutions. 

This  event  held  unique  importance, 
since  it  brought  recognition  of  the  use 
of  fingerprints  for  non-criminal  registra- 
tion. A  few  years  later,  the  primary  in- 
troduction by  Dr.  Henry  P.  de  Forest 
came  to  culmination  in  July,  1931,  when 
the  United  States  Civil  Service  extended 
fingerprinting  to  all  of  its  many  branches. 
Realization  was  dawning  on  the  Tweii- 
tieth  Century  that  fingerprint  identifica- 
tion need  not  be  limited  to  the  registra- 
tion of  public  enemies. 

Such  outstanding  instances  in  which 
fingerprinting  found  favor  in  civil  uses 
increased  appreciation  of  those  latent 
possibilities  once  so  familiar  and  neces- 
sary to  primitive  man,  whose  survival 
depended  upon  his  recognition  of  traces 
made  by  both  friend  and  foe.  Not  only 
in  the  United  States,  but  in  all  countries, 
had  man  retrieved  his  forgotten  birth- 
right. Though  the  technical  treatment 
varied  in  different  localities,  the  objective 
remained  identical ;  namely,  that  of  re- 
cording personal  identity. 

Despite  the  many  other  examples  of 
fingerprint  attainment,  none  can  dispute 
that  America's  criterion  is  the  Federal 
Bureau  of  Identification  at  Washington, 
D.  C.  Although  when  founded  in  1908, 
it  was  not  primarily  intended  as  a  reposi- 
tory or  clearing  house  for  such  records, 
but  since  its  later  direction  to  that  pur- 
pose, well  over  one  hundred  and  fifty 
million  fingerprint  cards  have  poured 
into  the  government  archives. 

In  tracing  the  origin  and  evolution  of 
this  vital  national  unit,  the  original  rec- 
ord file  created  by  the  International  As- 
sociation of  Chiefs  of  Police  prior  to 
1896,  at  Chicago,  is  recalled.  Although 
this  then  included  Bertillon  registration 
only,  it  constituted,  as  specified  earlier, 
the  first  American  record  bureau  ha\ing 


Phone  Hlllcrest  7-6583 

C  AND  C  AUTOMOTIVE 

JOBBERS 
4300  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

KANZLER'S  Upholstering  Studio 

RENOVATING  and   RECOVERING 
Custom-Made  Furniture    •    Restyling 

HI.  7-4833 
3717  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Dial  HI.  5-0109 

ALAN   MATTES  MARKET 

Choice   Meats,   Fish   and   Poultry    •    Locker  Beef 
3722  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GREENBRIER  MOTOR  HOTEL 

SACRAMENTO'S  NEWEST  AND  SMARTEST 
AIR  CONDITIONED  SWIMMING  POOL 

room  TELEPHONES 

Highway  99,  South  of  Fairgrounds 

4331   STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

Phone  HU.  6-2861 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


PEGG'S  PALLET  EXCHANGE 

PALLETS  MADE  TO  ORDER 
REPAIRED  and  ALTERED 

Res.  Phone:  Hlllcrest  6-8278 

Office  Phone:  HUnter  6-5190 

5889  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


SMITH   BROS.  PHARMACY 

ROSS  L.  SMITH,  Prop. 

Phone  HI.  5-7698 

Professional  Prescription  Pharmacist 

FREE  DEUVERY 

Since   1924 

3900  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA  > 


Whitney's    Golden    Eagle    Service: 


TRY  WHITNEY'S  FOR  SERVICE 
GAS    •    OIL    •    LUBRICATION 


Phone  HI.  5-9691 
5543  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA' 


FRUITRIDGB 


WALLPAPER  &  PAINT  1 


O'LINGERS  RECORD  SHOP 

BOB  O'LINGER 
Color  Consultant 

Res.  IV.  9-7148— Bus.  Hlllcrest  7-3963 
56S3-B  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


MILLS  AUTO  WRECKERS 

STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


i'rhruary   1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  57 


McMAHON    &    FORD 

Developers  of  Beautiful  Fruitridge  Manor 

and  the  Fruitridge  Shopping  Center 

Dial  HUlcrest  5-2608 

5653  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

GIBB'S    SERVICE 

MOBIL  PRODUCTS    •    UHAUL  TRAILERS 

Local  and  One  Way 

Phone  HL  6-1533 

3400  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

GREETINGS  FROM 

CALIFORNIA  MARKET 

p.   O.  Box   110  Ph.  HI.  5-9084 

V.  Q.  QUIAOT,  Notary  Public 

FLORIN  CALIFORNIA 

EASTERN     MARKET 

MEATS    •    GROCERIES    •    VEGETABLES 

Phone  HI.  5-1584 

3901  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

BILL     MITSOS 

Cesspools  and  Septic  Tanks  Cleaned  &  Serviced 

Test  Holes  and  Drain  Wells 

Telephone  HUlcrest  5-6081 

3435  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HARPER'S   PASTRY  SHOP 

IN  FRUITRIDGE  MANOR 
5621 -A  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 

Watch  for  the  ir  M,  B.  QUEVILLON,  Owner 

STAR    MOTIL 

MODERN  UNITS 

On  U.  S.  99  and  50 — Tel.  HI.  5-9754 

5303  STOCKTON  BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO  CALIFORNIA 


HUNTINGTON 
HOTEL 


1075 

California 

Street 

San  Francisco 


a  national  scope.  However,  the  organi- 
zation was  not  then  under  Federal  super- 
vision, and,  when  the  files  were  later 
nio\ed  to  Washington,  D.  C,  the  project 
was  still  in  the  nature  of  a  private  enter- 
prise. 

Eugene  Van  Buskirk,  the  superinten- 
dent, maintained  an  information  service 
for  all  enforcement  agencies  on  the 
bureau's  subscription  lists,  to  which,  for 
a  per  capita  fee,  peace  officers  might 
submit  records  of  local  prisoners,  and 
receive  in  return  the  data  from  the  cen- 
tral file  on  any  known  prior  offenses 
committed  by  the  subjects. 

A  similar  though  less  extensive  ex- 
change was  later  furnished  b\'  Major  R. 
\V.  McCloughry,  while  supervising  the 
record  bureau  at  Fort  Leavenworth  Pen- 
itentiary. 

The  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation 
was  originally  organized  to  prove  the 
United  States  Department  of  Justice 
with  a  permanent  investigative  force  un- 
der its  immediate  control.  It  was  first 
known  as  the  Division  of  Investigation. 
Its  subsequent  name,  the  Federal  Bureau 
of  Investigation,  was  finally  adopted  as 
more  nearly  descriptive  of  its  status  as 
the  general  investigative  agency  of  the 
Federal  Government.  And,  as  Congress 
passed  new  Federal  laws  extending  the 
bureau's  investigative  jurisdiction,  its 
size  and  importance  increased  ;  but  still 
the  department  did  not  employ  finger- 
prints. 

Those  courageous  American  statesmen 
whose  signatures  conclude  the  historic 
Declaration  of  Independence  are  revered 
everlastingly ;  and  comparably  illustrious 
are  those  leaders  of  science  who  brought 
about  the  attainment  of  fingerprints.  It 
is  probable  that  no  prior  event  in  the  his- 
tory of  personal  identification  contrib- 
uted more  effectiveh'  than  did  the  forma- 
tion of  a  fingerprint  unit  in  the  United 
States  Department  of  Justice  in  1924. 
To  those  responsible  for  this  epic  ad- 
vancement, not  only  in  the  field  of  law 
enforcement,  but  the  entire  world  owes 
a  debt  of  gratitude.  Many  persons,  di- 
rectly and  indirectly,  lent  aid  to  this  ac- 
complishment;  and  it  would,  of  course, 
be  impossible  to  enumerate  them  all ; 
however,  one  of  the  primary  and  most 
persevering  instigators  is  recognized  in 
August  Vollmer. 

Through  the  efforts  of  these  leaders, 
the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  was 
reorganized,  and  the  criminal  identifica- 
tion data  previously  maintained  at  Leav- 
enworth Penitentiary  was  consolidated 
with  the  records  of  the  International 
Association  of  Chiefs  of  Police,  to  form 
a  national  clearing  house  of  criminal  in- 
formation   \inder   the   bureau's  jurisdic- 


MORRELL'S  RIO  GRANDE  SERVICE 

Lubrication    •    Washing    •    Minor  Repairs 

Cor.  OCEAN  &  PLYMOUTH  AVES. 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


JAMES    MARKET 

3100  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


THE   MANGER   RESTAURANT 

611  WASHINGTON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

N  &  L  CLEANERS 

Special  One-Day  Service    •    Expert  Alterations 
Hats  Cleaned  &  Blacked 

602  EDDY  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

RAGNA  K.  NAESS 

Designer    •    Dressmaking  Classes 

1145  POLK  STREET — Studio  S 
OR.  3-8656 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

D.   M.  MacKENZIE 

Insurance  Broker 

2819  SAN  BRUNO  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Free  Estimates  Given 

G.    M  U  SETTI 

Plastering  Contractor 

411   VIENNA  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


THE  HICK'RY  PIT 


3545  California  St. 

San  Francisco 


E  M  B  E  E 

Grocery  Stores 

1244  LARKIN  STREET 
San    Francisco,   California 


Pnge  58 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February   1 95: 


Civic  Center  Fountain  Lunch 


500  VAN  NESS  AVENUE 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


D.  ZELBNSKY  &  SONS 

Painting  and  Decorating  Contractors 


165  GROVE  STREET 

(Civic  Center) 


SAN  FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


Burlington    Mills    California    Corp. 

1  DORMAN  AVENUE 

SAN  FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DALTON  &  COMPANY 

114  SANSOME  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

THE  UPJOHN  COMPANY 

199  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

ATwater  2-3200 

WIEBOLDT'S   MEMORIAL  CHAPEL 

FUNERAL  DIRECTORS 

835  VALENCIA  STREET 
Between   19th  and  20th 

SAN  FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

POTRERO   AUTOMOBILE  SERVICE 


22ND  AND  POTRERO  AVENUE 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


DIANA  SUPER-OUTLET 

2654  MISSION  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


tion.  Although  a  great  deal  of  this 
earlier  material  consisted  of  Hertillon 
measurements,  the  consolidation  broui^Iit 
to  A\'ashin5iton  a  nucleus  for  the  bu- 
reau's iilentilication  di\'ision  of  over  eight 
hunilred  tliousand  fingerprint  records. 

During  the  years  that  followed,  the 
bureau's  operations  were  systematized,  a 
training  school  for  government  agents 
was  founded  at  Washington,  and  t/: 
bureau  developed  many  and  various  serv- 
ices designed  to  promote  cooperation  be- 
tween it  and  other  law  enforcement 
agencies,  local,  state,  and  international. 

At  the  time  of  the  bureau's  reorgani- 
zation, the  Hon.  Harlan  F.  Stone,  after- 
ward a  Justice  of  the  United  States  Su- 
preme Court,  was  United  States  Attor- 
ney General.  His  Chief  Deputy  was 
John  Edgar  Hoover.  This  promising 
young  executive  was  selected  to  direct 
the  new  bureau's  destinies,  and  history 
was  in  the  making.  Under  the  eflficient 
guidance  of  its  able  chief  through  the 
succeeding  years,  the  Federal  Bureau  of 
Investigation  has  come  to  stand  for  the 
ultimate  in  law  enforcement;  its  care- 
fully selected  representatives  are  the 
chosen  heroes  of  America's  young  man- 
hood;  and  its  policies  and  practices  mark 
it  as  an  all-time,  national  standard  of  t'ii" 
sterling  qualities  inscribed  upon  its  of- 
ficial insignia:  Fidelity,  Bravery  and  In- 
tegrity. 


OFFICER  OF  THE  MONTH 

(Continued  from  page  13) 
made  him  the  most  publicized  mounted 
policeman    San    Francisco    has    seen    in 
many  a  year. 

It  also  won  him  the  Police  and 
Peace  Officers'  Journal's  first  Cer- 
tificate of  Merit  and  a  $50  United  States 
Sa\'ings  bond  for  the  outstanding  indi- 
vidual piece  of  police  work  in  the  state 
of  California  during  the  thirty-day  pe- 
riod between  Januarv  and  February 
15th,  1953. 

Chaney's  horse.  Bill,  was  no  less 
heroic  than  his  master.  Sometimes  swim- 
ming, sometimes  walking  on  the  sand\' 
bottom,  the  plucky  animal  moved  headon 
into  line  after  line  of  the  wind-tossed 
breakers.  Out  to  where  Williamson 
struggled  for  his  life.  The  youth  shouted 
"Get  the  girl.  She  needs  help  worse  than 
I  do.  "  The  horse  and  his  rider  moved  on 
through  the  breakers  to  the  point  more 
than  100  yards  off  shore  where  Barbara 
floated  for  the  moment  in  a  patch  of 
quiet  water. 

It  took  all  of  Chaney's  strength  and 
skill  to  keep  the  beast  moving  into  the 
current.  To  swing  broadside  would  be 
disastrous.  Rut  Bill's  animal  instinct  and 
the  officer's  common  sense  paid  off.  Be- 
fore long   Chaney  and   Bill   reached   the 


SPROUSE-REITZ  CO..  No.  705 

SAVE  THE  SPROUSE  WAY 

475  ALVARADO  STREET 

MONTEREY  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  5-4163 

Monterey  Transfer  and  Storage 

LOCAL — STATEWIDE — NATIONWIDE 

735  DEL  MONTE  AVENUE 

MONTEREY  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  8-9960 


P.  O.  Box  1208 


J.    i.    HARRIS 

AUTHORIZED  SHELL  DEALER 

Shellubrication    •    Firestone  Tires  -  Batteries 

SAN  CARLOS  AND  SEVENTH  STREET 

CARMEL  CALIFORNIA 

THE  ARTICHOKE  INN 

V.  J.  CORNAGGIA,  Prop. 

Artichoke  Croquette — Served  No  Place 

Else  in  the  World 

18  PORTER  DRIVE — Phone  507 

WATSONVILLE  CALIFORNIA 


ADOLPH'S    PLACE 

Telephone  2018 
69  FRONT  STREET 

SANTA  CRUZ  CALIFORNIA 

BUILDER  INSURANCE  LEASES 

LIOE^EL  H.  HAYDEL 

LICENSED  REAL  ESTATE  BROKER 

3507  MISSION  STREET 

Mission  8-5741 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


EXCLUSIVE  SHIRT  LAUNDRY 


1722  TARAVAL  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CRYSTAL  WINE  &  LIQUORS 

FREE  DELIVERY 

4310  CALIFORNIA  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HILLCREST  SANITARIUM 

601   STEINER  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WORTHINGTON  APARTMENTS 

1167  BUSH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


S  &  M 
AUTO  REPAIR 

2340  LOMBARD  ST. 
Fillmore  6-7818 


i\h, 


I 'J  5  3 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  59 


Ladies:  Mon.,  Tues.,  Wed.,  Thurs. 
Men :  Fri.,  Sat.  and  Sun. 


CASTRO  ROCK 

STEAM  BATHS 

• 

Hygiene  Beneficial 
for  Health 


Open  Daily  10  A.M.  to  10  P.M. 
Sundays  9  A.M.  to    4  P.M. 


MASSAGE 

by 

APPOINTMENT 

• 

Phone  UNderhii.l  1-5995 

• 

582  CASTRO 
(Bet.  18th  and  19th  Sts.) 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 


OPEN  7  DAYS  A  WEEK 
8  A.M.  to  8  P.M. 

GARDEN  GROVE 
AUTO  PARTS 

ACCESSORIES  •  PARTS 

Jim  Anderson 
Phone  Garden  Grove  9525 

9141  GARDEN  GROVE  BLVD. 

Garden  Grove.  Calif. 


CARSON'S 
Liquor  Store 

Liquors,  Wines  &  Beer 

9131  GARDEN  GROVE  BLVD. 
Tel.  Garden  Grove  2268 

Garden  Grove,  Calif. 


fjiri.  She  groped  toward  the  saildle  but 
her  numbed,  exhausted  fingers  were  in- 
c.ipable  of  holding  any  sort  of  a  grip. 
The  biggest  task  was  ahead  for  Chaney 
and  Bill.  For  the  moment  the  nearest 
line  of  combers  was  breaking  well  be- 
\ond  them.  But  the  surf  is  an  unpredict- 
able thing.  Waves  are  not  particular 
about  the  point  where  they  break.  And 
if  one  had  broken  too  close  when  Chaney 
swung  his  steed  around,  plunged  an  arm 
in  the  water  and  haided  the  girl  bodily 
aboard,  a  man,  a  girl  and  a  horse  would 
have  needed  rescuing.  Then,  with  the 
girl  in  tow,  all  the  officer  had  to  do  was 
hold  iier  secure  with  one  hand  while  he 
■ent  his  horse  shoreward  with  the  other. 
Riding  a  horse  is  a  one-handed  job,  but 
not  in  a  raging  surf. 

A  crowd  had  gathered  on  Ocean 
Beach  when  Jack  anil  Bill  went  to  sea. 
A  camera  fan  had  hauled  out  his  box  and 
was  recording  the  scene  on  film.  A  few 
moments  later  two  powerfully  built  men 
in  swimming  suits  plunged  into  the  surf 
to  help.  They  met  Chaney  about  half 
WAX  in  and  took  over  the  task  of  towing 
the  girl  ashore.  Seconds  later,  the  dra- 
matic incident  was  over.  Officer  Wil- 
liam Becker,  a  former  lifeguard,  and 
Walter  ^Vehr,  chief  lifeguard  at  Fleish- 
hacker  Pool,  the  pair  who  had  come  to 
Chaney 's  assistance,  were  gi\'ing  the  girl 
first  aid.  Chaney  and  Rill  stood  nearby, 
wet,  cold  and  exhausted.  Later  report- 
ers found  out  just  what  had  happened. 

Williamson  and  Miss  Engs  had  been 
playing  in  the  surf  near  the  rubber  boat 
when  a  wave  suddenly  washed  it  away 
from  them.  The  young  couple  started  to 
swim  ashore  but  tired  rapidly.  The  boy 
attempted  to  help  the  girl,  but  more 
waves  swept  them  apart.  The  girl  drifted 
out  to  sea  while  the  boy  was  rolled  shore- 
warii.    Then  Chaney  appeared. 

Chaney's  act  made  him  an  obvious 
choice  for  the  Police  and  Peace  Offi- 
CHRs'  Journal  award.  He  went  to  Bar- 
bara's aid  without  regard  for  his  own 
life.  Booted  and  in  full  uniform  he 
would  not  have  had  a  chance  in  the  surf 
if  Bill  had  turned  broadside  to  a  wave 
and  been  swept  off  his  feet.  But  his 
deed  was  more  than  one  of  courage. 
There  was  thought  behind  his  act  and 
careful  preparation.  Chaney  had  antici- 
pated a  situation  such  as  the  one  which 
confronted  him  that  day  and  prepared 
for  it.  He  had  trained  Bill  for  his  part 
of  the  rescue.  Horses  have  no  great  Io\c 
for  swimming  and  e\en  less  for  rough 
water.  In  spite  of  this,  due  to  Chaney's 
preparation,    the    animal    came    through 


CHASE  BROS.  DAIRY 

Sertiiij!,  Ventura  County  with 
I'resb  Dairy  Products 


A  Complete  Line  of  Fresh  Dairy 
Products  and  Eggs 


Oxnard  Phone  66-5193 

Outside  Oxnard: 
Exchange  ZEnith  3060 

OXNARD,  CALIF. 


TROPICAL  &  GOLD  FISH 
AQUATIC  PLANTS  &  SUPPLIES 

E.  R.  Tolman       Phone  Anaheim  6508 

Tropical  Fish  Hatchery 


U.  S.  HIGHWAY  101 

Belueen  Santa  Ana  and  Anaheim 

Open  Daily  ex.  Monday  9  a.m. -7  p.m. 
Open  Tuesday  &  Friday  'til  9 


P.  O.  Address 

11362  101  HIGH-WAY 
ANAHEIM,  CALIF 

Canaries  and  Bird  Seed  and  Supplies 


Page  60 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


February!  1 953 


WOMAC  & 
WOMAC 

Chevrolet  Dealers 


Phone  656 

Calexico 
California 


RENE  R.  ROMERO 

Customhouse  Broker 


Tel.  Calexico  983  &  984 

102  RocKWOOD  Avenue 

Calexico 

California 


with  H\iiig  colors.  It  was  this  preparation 
as  well  as  the  officer's  unselfish  courage, 
which  won  him  the  award.  His  fore- 
sight as  well  as  his  fearlessness  can  well 
serve  as  an  example  to  all  California 
Peace  Officers. 

Honorable  Mention 

Paul  J.  Hayes  of  the  San  Diego  Police 
Department  came  as  close  to  winning  the 
Police  and  Peace  Officers'  Journal 
$50  savings  bond  for  outstanding  police 
work  this  month  as  a  policeman  can  and 
not  win.  Ha\'es'  record,  however,  indi- 
cates that  one  of  these  days  he  will 
emerge  on  top. 

On  the  eleventh  of  February,  1953, 
Hayes  was  riding  in  a  police  car  when  a 
radio  call  announced  that  a  woman  had 
fallen  into  the  water  at  the  foot  of  Ash 
Street  on  the  Embarcadero.  Hayes  and 
a  companion  sped  to  the  scene  and  found 
56-year-old  Mrs.  May  Homer  struggling 
in  the  water.  The  officer  dove  12  feet  off 
the  Embarcadero  and  rescued  the  woman. 

Rescue  work  is  nothing  new  to  Hayes. 
The  son  of  a  former  San  Diego  chief  of 
detectives,  he  learned  to  swim  with  Flor- 
ence Chadwick  and  his  aquatic  ability  has 
been  put  to  use  many  times.  He  was  one 
of  the  divers  who  helped  recover  the 
bodies  of  two  children  who  drowned  last 
summer  in  a  pool  near  Grantville,  Mis- 
sion Valley.  Dozens  of  times  he  has  aided 
in  rescuing  persons  carried  to  sea  in  the 
surf  of  San  Diego's  beaches. 

When  nine  persons  were  dumped  into 
treacherous  Mission  Bay  Channel  in 
1Q51,  Hayes  saved  four  of  them. 

With  a  record  like  that,  there  is  little 
doubt  that  Hayes'  number  will  come  up 
again.  Of  all  the  trusts  imposed  on  a 
police  officer,  that  of  protecting  human 
life  is  beyond  doubt  the  greatest.  Like 
Jack  Chaney,  Hayes  saved  one  person 
from  almost  certain  death.  Chaney  was 
chosen  above  him  for  a  variety  of  reasons, 
the  main  one  of  which  is  San  Francisco's 
Ocean  Beach  surf.  'Fhere  are  more 
treacherous  beaches,  but  not  many. 
Chaney,  plunging  his  horse  into  it  while 
fully  clothed,  was  wagering  his  life 
against  saving  a  life.  He  won.  And  part 
of  the  reason  he  won  was  because  he  had 
prepared  for  the  ordeal.  Both  of  these 
factors  meant  a  lot.  But  while  we  are 
handing  Chaney  the  cash  we  cannot  help 
saying  congratulations  to  Officer  Ha>es 
.  .  .  and  better  luck  next  time. 


JACK'S    TAVERN 


1931   SUTTER  STREET 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


THE  ARCHES 
APTS.  MOTEL 

CHAS.  and  IVA  KOHLMAN 


224  Newport  Blvd. 

Newport  Beach 

California 


BRACEWELL'S 

CAFE,  POOL 

ROOM  & 

BAMBOO  ROOM 


Phone  554-05 

339  Third  Street 

San  Bernardino 

California 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


I 


T  WAS  A  BRIGHT  EARLY  DECEM- 
BER DAY  and  Lieutenant  Hudner 
was  flying  a  Korean  combat  mission 
alongside  another  plane  piloted  by 
Ensign  Jesse  Brown.  A  burst  of  flak 


which  he  fought  to  keep  the  fire 
away  from  the  fatally  injured  en- 
sign until  a  rescue  helicopter  ar- 
rived. Today  Lieutenant  Hudner 
says : 

"Maybe  if  America  had  been 
strong  enough  to  discourage  ag- 
gression two  years  ago.  my  friend, 
Jesse  Brown,  might  be  alive  right 
now.  So  might  thousands  more  of 
our  Korea  dead. 

"For  it's  only  too  sadly  true- 
today,  in  our  world,  weakness  in- 
vites attack.  And  peace  is  only  for 
the  strong. 

"Our  present  armed  forces  are 
Strong— and  growing  stronger.  But 


don't  turn  back  the  clock !  Do  you- 
part  toward  keeping  America's 
guard  up  by  buying  more  .  .  .  and 
more  .  .  .  and  more  United  States 
Defense  Bonds  nou!  Back  us  up. 
And  lofielher  well  build  the  strong 
peace  that  all  Americans  desire!" 

*  •  * 
Remember  that  when  you're  buying  bonds 
for  defense,  you're  also  building  a  per- 
sonal reserve  of  savings.  Remember,  too, 
thai  if  you  don't  save  regularly,  you  gen- 
erally don't  save  at  all.  So  sign  up  today 
in  the  Payroll  Savings  Plan  or  the  Bond- 
A-Month  Plan.  Buy  United  States  De- 
fense Bonds  now! 

Race  is  for  the  strong.., 
Buy  U  S  Defense  Bonds  nowl 


caught  the  ensign's  plane  and  he 
went  spinning  down,  aflame.  Lieu- 
tenant Hudner  then  deliberately 
crash  landed  near  his  flame-trapped 
shipmate.  He  radioed  for  help,  after 


Lt.(jg)  Thomas  Hudner,  Jr.  u.  s.n. 


The  V.  S.  Government  does  not  pay  for  tnis  advertisement.  It  is  donated  by  this  publication  in  cooperation  with  the  Advertising  Council  and  the  Magazine  Fubiishers  of  America, 


Sec.  34.66  P.  L.  &  R. 
U.   S.   POSTAGE 

PAID 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Permit  No.  3172 


Tceturn  Poitmre  Gnaranteed 
465  Tenth  Street,  San  Francisco  S 


SanFraoc.sco27. 


1 


FINER  GAS  RANGES 

O'Keefe  and  Merritt  Ranges 

A  Model 
For  Every  Home 


* 


Call  Your  Regular  Dealer 


962  Battery  Street,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 


SAN  FRANCISCO  EDITION 


APRIL    •    1  953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


TIMELY  TYPOGRAPHY 

510  Clay  Street 

Compliments 
the 

SAN  FRANCISCO 
POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

on  its 
efficiency  and  integrity 


GRATTAN  ENGLISH,  JR.,  Manager 


(Copyright,   1931,  2-0  Publishing  Co.) 
Founded   1922 

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Police  and  Peace  Officers'  Journal 

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Fir  Plytvod  Exterior  and  Interior 


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April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  1 


Featured  in  This  Issue 

PAGE 

Editorial 3 

Traffic  Circus 4 

AVolf  Hunt  in  Los  Angeles 5 

Cornell  Old  Name  in  Merced 6 

Merced  Moves  Ahead 7 

Garrity  Elected  in  Santa  Clara 8 

By  Anne  Hitt 

Civic  Unity  in  San  Jose 9 

By  Bill  Walker 

Pistol  Pointing 10 

By  J.  Ross  DUNNIGAN 

And  One  Crept  Silently  to  Rest 11 

By  Walter  R.  Hecox 

No  More  Sheepherders *  .     .  12 

Women  Peace  Officers 13 

Officer  of   the   Month 14 

Traffic   Toll 15 

Police  Promotional  Examination  Questions     .     .  31 

Safety  Contest 33 

School   for   Examiners 34 

Traffic   Seminar 42 

Associated  Public  Communications  Officers     .     .  4'? 

The  Long  Road 51 

Excerpts  From  San  Francisco  Police  Ordinances  53 

Traffic  Record  School 58 

FBI  Conference 59 


The  Editor  is  always  pleased  to  consider  articles  suitable  for  publication.  Con- 
tributions should  preferably  be  typewritten,  but  where  this  is  not  possible,  copy 
should  be  clearly  WTitten.  Contributions  may  be  signed  with  a  "nom  de  plume." 
but  all  articles  must  bear  the  name  and  address  of  the  sender,  which  will  be 
treated  with  the  strictest  confidence.  The  Editor  will  also  be  pleased  to  consider 
photographs  of  officers  and  of  interesting  events.  Letters  should  be  addressed  to 
the  Editor. 


Directory 

SAN  FRANCISCO  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

Hall  of  Justice,  Kearny  and  Washington  Streets 

Telephone  SUtter  1-2020 

Radio  Short  Wave  Call  KMA-438 


Mayor,  Hon.  Elmer  E.  Robinson 


POLICE  COMMISSIONERS 

Regular  Meetings,  Wednesday,  2 :00  p.m.,  Hall  of  Justrce 

W.ASHiNGTON-  I.  KoHNKE,  President 686  Sacramento  Street 

Henrv  C.  M.acinn 315  Montgomery  Street 

J.  Warnock  Walsh 160  Montgomery  Street 

Sergeant  John  T.  Butler,  Secretary 
Room  104,  Hall  of  Justice 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE Michael  Gaffey 

DEPUTY  CHIEF  OF  POLICE Bernard  J.  McDonald 

Chief  of  Inspectors James  Encluh 

Director  of  Traffic Jack  Eker 

Dept.  Secy... Captain  Michael  F.  Fitzpatrick     Hall  of  Justice 

District  Captains 

Central Daniel  McKlem 635  Washington  Street 

Southern Walter  Ames Fourth  and  Clara  Streets 

Mission Edward  Donohue 1240   Valencia    Street 

Northern Peter   Conroy 941    Ellis   Street 

Richmond Aloysius  O'Brien 451  Sixth  Avenue 

Ingleside Leo  Tackney Balboa  Park 

Taraval August  G.   Steffen 2348  Twenty-fourth   ."Avenue 

Potrero Ted  Terlau 2300*  Third  Street 

Golden  Gate  Park William  Danahy Stanyan  opp.  Waller 

Traffic Ralph  E.  Olstad Hall  of  Justice 

City  Prison Lt.  Walter  Thompson Hall  of  Justice 

Civilian  Defense George  Healy Hall  of  Justice 

Bur.  Inspectors Cornelius  Murphy .Hall  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureai;  of 

Personnel John  A.  Encler Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of 

Criminology Fkancis  X.  Latulipi Hill  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Special  Services Otto  Meyer Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of  Juvenile  Bureau 2475  Greenwich  Street 

John  Meehan 

Director  -  Bureau  of  Criminal 

Information Lieut.  George  Hippely Hall  of  Justice 

Insp.  of  Schools 

Traffic  Control Insp.  Thomas  B.  Tract 

Supervising  Captain 

of  Districts Jeremiah  J.  Couchlin Hall  of  Justice 

Chinatown  Detail Lt.  H.  C.  Atkinson Hall  of  Justice 

Range  Master Pistol  Range,  Lake  Merced 

Emil  Dutil 


When  In  Doubt 


Always  At  Your  Service 


From  faraway 

places-more 

oil  for  you 


In  Sumatra  back  in  1924,  standard  Oil  Company  of  California  geologists 
began  mapping  possible  deposits  of  oU.  But  not  until  last  year  did  Sumatran 
wells  start  adding  to  available  oil  supplies.  This  operation,  costing  some 
$62  million  to  date,  was  pioneered  by  Standard.  It  is  now  carried  on  jointly 
with  The  Texas  Company  under  the  name  "Caltex." 


Into  San  Francisco  Bay  come  tankers  carrying 
Sumatran  crude — returns  on  the  gamble  Standard  under- 
took nearly  30  years  ago.  Other  shipments  go  elsewhere 
in  the  world,  aiding  progress  and  adding  defensive  strength. 
Four  friendly  nations  in  particular  benefit  directly.  First,  of 
course,  is  the  young  Indonesian  Republic,  of  which  Sumatra 
is  a  part.  Then  Australia,  Japan  and  the  Philippines.  They 
produce  practically  no  oil  of  their  own,  but  wiU  be  supplied 


in  the  near  future  by  refineries  which  Caltex  is  helping  to 
buUd.  ^  And,  of  course,  the  Sumatran  oil  brought  into  this 
country  helps  keep  you  in  gasoline  and  the  many  other 
petroleum  products  you've  come  to  rely  on.  ^  The  foreign 
activities  of  Standard  Oil  Company  of  California,  typified  by 
this  flow  of  crude  from  faraway  Sumatra,  are  constantly 
being  expanded,  as  an  added  guarantee  that  petroleum 
needs  of  the  free  world  will  continue  to  be  met. 


STANDARD  OIL  COMPANY  OF  CALIFORNIA  plans  ahead  to  serve  you  better 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  3 


"Efficient  Police 

Make  a  Land  of 

Peace" 


(Established  1922) 


±^  PEACE  OFFICERS* 


The  Magazine 

Peace  Officers 

Read 

(Trade  Mark  Copyright) 


Vol.  XXVI 


APRIL,  1953 


No.  5 


[E©ai'(6)isii^iL 


Originally  we  had  this  space  reserved  for  Barney  Mc- 
Donald, San  Francisco's  recently  retired  Deputy  Chief  of 
Police.  But  Barney  will  have  to  wait  until  May  now  .  .  . 
even  if  we  do  have  to  tear  his  story  out  of  the  dummy. 
Under  the  circumstances  we  are  sure  he  won't  mind. 

Today  is  Monday,  April  20,  1953.  It  is  just  four  days 
until  the  Policemen's  Ball.  Time  for  a  last  minute  drive 
to  sell  tickets.  But  San  Francisco  Policemen  may  find  it  a 
little  hard  to  sell  tickets  this  week.  There  are  going  to  be 
people  who  say,  "What  do  we  want  to  help  those  bums 
for?  Aren't  they  getting  enough  extra  dough  on  their 
beats?" 

There  are  going  to  be  some  angry  officers  this  week  .  .  . 
and  probably  for  weeks  to  come.  There  are  going  to  be 
some  tearful  wives  who  report  to  their  policeman  husbands 
that  they  received  singularly  cold  treatment  at  their  sewing 
circles  or  bridge  clubs.  And  almost  every  officer  is  going 
to  find  some  of  his  friends  looking  at  him  with  the  silent 
question  in  his  eyes.  "How  about  it,  Mac?  Are  you  get- 
ting any  of  that  sugar?"  Times  are  going  to  be  pretty 
tough  on  the  San  Francisco  Police  Department.  And  why  ? 

^Ve'll  tell  \ou  why.  All  this  is  going  to  happen  so  a 
San  Francisco  newspaper  can  boost  its  lagging  circulation. 
There  are  a  lot  of  ways  to  boost  circulation.  The  best  way, 
of  course,  is  to  consistently  turn  out  the  best  newspaper 
with  the  best  news  coverage  in  the  city,  day  in  and  day  out. 
People  will  always  buy  that  kind  of  paper.  But  every  now 
and  then  things  go  wrong.  One  paper  lets  the  other  get  a 
little  ahead  of  it.  Then  there  is  nothing  left  to  do  but 
resort  to  the  timeworn  tricks  of  the  trade. 

Contests  do  a  lot  to  stimulate  circulation.  People  will 
buy  a  paper  to  find  out  how  their  kid  is  doing  in  a  spelling 
contest  or  essay  contest  or  golf  tournament.  Special  bonus 
prices  help.  Most  newspapers  also  have  domestic  science 
specialists  and  fashion  exeperts  to  help  sell  the  sheet.  A 
well  run  pattern  department  can  sell  a  lot  of  papers.  There 
are  other  ways  to  help  sell  papers  too  numerous  to  mention. 
But  if  the  paper  really  needs  a  shot  in  the  arm  there  is  one 
sure  way  to  send  at  least  your  street  sales  booming.  It 
never  misses.   All  you  have  to  do  is  start  a  crusade. 

On  Monday,  April  20,  1953  a  crusade  started  in  San 
Francisco,  complete  with  banner  heads,  flaming  red  cuts 
and  a  sidebar  story  about  the  secret  city.  And  all  this 
would  be  all  right  with  us  if  it  named  names  and  put  its 
figurative  finger  on  positive  facts.  But  none  of  this  has 
been  done.  There  is  not  one  name  in  the  crusade  story, 
not  even  the  byline  of  the  reporter  or  rewrite  man  who 
wrote  it.   The  sidebar  story  explained  all  this. 


"But  nobody  wanted  to  put  his  name  to  the  document — 
too  dangerous,  against  the  code  of  the  Tenderloin,  cost  a 
man  his  illegal  business  maybe." 

So  we  have  a  crusade  which  strikes  nowhere.  A  news- 
paper, sword  in  hand,  leading  its  legions  of  readers  up  the 
blind  alley  of  iniuiendo.  It  is  an  easy  thing  to  do.  The 
crusade  will  hurt  no  one.  No  one,  that  is,  except  for  the 
1500  men  of  the  San  Francisco  Police  Department  and 
their  families.  E\ery  one  of  them  has  been  branded  a  crook 
in  the  eyes  of  the  public. 

It  is  an  axiom  that  any  man  who  wears  a  uniform- — 
whether  he  is  a  sailor,  negro  or  policeman — is  judged  by 
the  conduct  of  the  most  noticeable  and,  invariably,  the  least 
attractive  of  his  fellows.  There  are  bad  apples  in  every 
barrel.  The  man  who  does  not  recognize  this  fact  is  pull- 
ing the  old  ostrich  trick — hiding  his  head  in  a  hole.  But 
only  the  men  in  uniform  suffer  because  of  their  contem- 
poraries' behavior. 

AVe  of  the  PoLiei;  axd  Pe.vck  Officers'  Journal 
believe  that  every  officer  who  is  discovered  taking  graft  or 
deliberately  overlooking  violations  of  the  law  should  be 
punished  to  the  fullest  extent  of  the  law.  But  we  also 
believe  that  it  is  unjust  and  unfair  to  condemn  every  man 
connected  with  one  of  the  most  worthwhile  professions 
there  is  for  the  dishonest  acts  of  the  few. 

The  newspaper  in  question  was  careful  to  point  out  that 
most  officers  are  honest.  At  the  end  of  a  paragraph  which 
was  almost  lost  on  the  bottom  of  page  one,  the  somewhat 
anonymous  lead  story  on  Monday  declared,  "The  honest 
officer — of  course  the  vast  majority — just  ignores  the  whole 
payment  scheme."  Of  course  the  next  paragraph  starts, 
"When  the  captain  is  crooked  .  .  ."  so  you  can  laugh  off 
that  honesty  line  as  fast  as  you  want  to. 

^Ve  have  had  our  differences  of  opinion  with  Chief 
Gaffey  in  the  past  but,  no  matter  how  we  felt  about  them, 
there  is  one  fact  we  are  sure  of:  Chief  of  Police  Michael 
Gaffey  is  as  honest  a  man  as  there  is  in  San  Francisco,  doing 
his  best  to  maintain  law  and  order  in  a  rugged  seaport  city. 
And  that  "vast  majorit>"  includes  about  99  percent  of  his 
men. 

We  realize  that  our  protest  against  this  crusade  is  weak 
and  perhaps  futile.  Our  voice  is  a  small  one,  lost,  perhaps, 
in  the  roar  of  the  metropolitan  press.  But  we  wanted  to 
label  this  expose  for  what  it  is  .  .  .  and  to  say  to  the  offend- 
ing newspaper,  "Put  up  or  shut  up.  Name  names  or  admit 
that  this  whole  thing  is  just  a  circulation  stunt.  And  then 
call  the  whole  thing  off  and  start  a  nice,  friendly  essay 

^"t'^sf-"  Walter  R.  Hecox,  Editor 


Page  4 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS"  JOURNAL 

TRAFFIC   CIRCUS 


April,  1953 


Traffic  safety  has  become  more  mean- 
ingful to  countless  school  children  across 
the  land  because  of  a  hardworking  police 
officer  and  his  troupe  of  talented  dogs. 

Known  as  the  Officer  Pressley  Traffic 
Safety  Circus,  the  unique  show  has 
"played"  to  more  than  three  million 
wide-eyed  youngsters  throughout  the 
countr}'.  It  is  currently  touring  elemen- 
tary schools  under  sponsorship  of  the 
American  Trucking  Associations. 


dren  goes  to  Ernest  E.  Pressley,  a  police 
officer  from  Charlotte,  N.  C.  He  con- 
ceived the  idea  while  noticing  the  rapt 
attention  of  neighborhood  children  in 
tricks  performed  by  his  pet  setter.  Press- 
ley  augmented  his  troupe  with  more  dogs 
and  started  his  tour  of  the  country. 

Leading  Lady 

Eight  highly  trained  dogs  make  up  the 
canine  cast  of  the  Traffic  Safety  Circus, 


dren's  favorite  is  Elmer,  the  clown,  who 
manages  to  do  everything  wrong  at  the 
right  time. 

Repetitive  Technique 

The  dogs  perform  with  a  series  of 
props,  ladders,  platforms  and  other  para- 
phernalia, each  representing  a  factor  re- 
lated to  street  traffic  and  safety  rules. 
Pressley  uses  the  repetitive  technique  to 
drive  home   his  message  of  safety,  and. 


A  YOUTHFUL  ADMIRER  MEETS  THE  TRAFFIC  CIRCUS  STARS. 


No  Dry  Lecture 

Instead  of  the  usual  dry  lecture  tech- 
nique, kids  are  treated  to  a  40-minute 
circus,  complete  with  music,  performing 
dogs  and  ringmaster.  Needless  to  say, 
they  go  for  it  in  a  big  way,  but  better 
yet  the  show's  lessons  in  traffic  safety 
habits  are  well  remembered. 

Credit  for  originating  the  novel 
method  of  teaching  safety  to  school  chil- 


keeping  the  kids  glued  to  their  seats  by 
performing  a  great  variety  of  difficult 
tricks.  Each  act  points  up  the  import- 
ance of  traffic  safety  and  brings  real 
meaning  to  Pressley's  slogan  —  "Walk 
Safe — Ride  Safe — Play  Safe." 

Leading  lady  of  the  show  is  Lassie,  a 
collie  well  versed  in  safety  habits.  Other 
members  of  the  troupe  include  Susie, 
Mig,  Lady,  Dot,  Jingles,  Annie  and 
Elmer.    According  to  Pressley,  the  chil- 


telling  of  accidents,  asks  the  children 
how  such  accidents  could  have  been  pre- 
vented. 

Evidence  of  the  Traffic  Safety  Circus' 
amazing  success  in  impressing  the  import- 
ance of  observing  traffic  regulations 
among  school  children  is  the  constant 
flood  of  letters  being  received  by  the 
American  Trucking  Associations  from 
enthusiastic  parents  and  teachers. 
(Continued  on  page  41) 


Jpril,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  5 


Wolf  Hunt  In  Los  Angeles 


Excerpt  from  a  Los  Angeles  Police 
Department  memo  dated  January  30. 
1953:  "The  nth  Street  Police  Divi- 
sion, during  the  months  of  May,  June 
and  July,  1952,  tvas  faced  with  the  prob- 
lem of  apprehending  the  perpetrator  of 
numerous  crimes  against  uo/ncn.  More 
than  25  women  had  been  molested  dur- 
ing this  period,  and  also  numerous  purse 
snatchings  had  been  reported. 


She  walked  alone  through  the  half 
light  of  the  sixty-five  hundreil  block  of 
San  Pedro  Street.  The  feathers  of  fear 
lay  quiet  within  her  but  goose  pimples  of 
excitement  tingled  on  her  skin.  She  was 
serenely  confident  of  her  ability  to  de- 
fend herself. 

It  was  nine  o'clock  or  a  little  before 
and  the  daylight  saving  sun  had  set  a 
half    hour   earlier.     "Fwilight   had   come 


lights  and  an  occasional  neon  sign. 

Trim.  That  is  not  saying  enough.  She 
was  a  26  year  old  dark  eyed  brunette,  five 
feet  four  inches  tall  and  1 19  pounds.  A 
delightful  morsel  of  femininity  in  any- 
body's book.  A  policewoman  ?  Yes.  The 
kind  of  a  policewoman  a  man  would  en- 
joy being  arrested  by. 

Her  assignment?  On  the  night  of  July 
30th,     Policewoman     Florence    Coberlv 


FLORENCE  COBERLV  RECEIVING  AWARD  FUR  COLRAGE. 


"Numerous  detectives  and  plainclothes 
officers  were  assigned  for  the  purpose  of 
this  apprehension.  In  addition  to  the  de- 
tectives and  plainclothes  officers,  a  num- 
ber of  policemen  were  also  asked  to  assist. 

"On  July  30,  1952,  Policewoman 
Florence   Coberly,  while  patrolling  the 


and  gone  and  the  modest  residential  dis- 
trict was  already  shrouded  in  darkness. 
The  trim  young  woman  who  walked 
along  San  Pedro  Street  was  easy  to  see 
in  spite  of  the  meager  illumination.  The 
light  colored  clothing  she  had  deliber- 
ately worn  for  the  occasion  stood  out 
clearly   in    the   dim    glow   of   the   street 


was  bait  in  a  special  kind  of  trap.  A 
well  trained  tidbit  placed  in  a  snare 
which  had  been  set  to  apprehend  the 
vicious  human  animal  who  had  been 
preying  on  the  women  of  southeast  Los 
Angeles.  The  unknown  predator  who 
had  given  the  San  Pedro  Street  area  the 
(Continued  nn  page  36) 


Page  6 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April.  1953 


Cornell  Old  Name  In  Merced 


A  person  would  have  to  reach  back 
more  than  four  decades  in  Merced  Coun- 
ty history  to  find  the  record  of  the  first 
member  of  the  Cornell  family  to  hold 
the  office  of  sheriff  there. 

It  was  back  in  1910  that  S.  C.  Cornell 
was  elected  to  the  top  law  enforcement 
post  in  Merced  County,  defeating  the 
incumbent  John  S.  Swan  and  a  fellow 
named  Dooley  in  a  hotly  contested  race 
for  the  office. 

Unfortunately  death  intervened  with 


all  hell  was  breaking  loose  in  Europe.  On 
the  western  front  the  Germans  were  lob- 
bing big  shell  into  Paris  with  the  aid  of 
an  oversized  cannon  they  called  the  "Big 
Bertha"  and  back  in  what  is  now  known 
as  Iron  Curtain  country  the  Russians  had 
given  up  trying  to  ward  off  the  invading 
Prussians  with  pitchforks  and  had  taken 
to  fighting  among  themselves. 

The  young  fellow  from  Merced  want- 
ed in  on  the  act  so,  in  1917,  he  joined 
the  merchant  marine.    That  didn't  last 


wants  of  himself  and  his  family  until 
1934.  It  would  have  continued  to  do 
so  if  there  had  not  been  a  clamor  by  the 
citizens  for  him  to  run  for  sheriff. 

Cornell  recollects  that  things  were 
pretty  rough  in  Merced  County  in  those 
days.  The  county  was  what  might  have 
been  called  wide  open  and  people  were 
perfectly  satisfied  with  the  status  quo.  At 
least  some  people  were. 

The  county  was  just  recovering  from 
prohibition  and  lawlessness  was  still  look- 


SHERIFF  CORNELL  (Center)   POSES  AT  MERCED  FESTIVAL. 


the  elder  Cornell's  career  as  a  peace  offi- 
cer and  before  the  November,  1914  elec- 
tions, he  was  removed  from  the  political 
scene  by  the  grim  reaper. 

Young  N.  L.  Cornell  was  just  a  sprout 
at  that  time  scarcely  able  to  make  his 
own  way  in  life.  Two  years  later  he 
started  out  on  his  own  with  a  job  in  San 
Francisco.  It  was  1916  and  big  things 
were  doing  in  the  world.  Across  what 
was  popularly  known  as  the  "big  pond" 


long,  however.  There  was  quite  a  hub- 
bub raised  that  same  year  about  a  ship 
named  the  Lusitania  being  sunk  by  a 
German  submarine  and  before  Lucius 
really  found  his  sea  legs  he  was  in  the 
army.  After  a  two-year  hitch  in  the  serv- 
ice of  Uncle  Sam  Cornell  returned  to 
Merced  and  entered  the  banking  busi- 
ness. 

Later  Lucius  Cornell  started  a  hay  and 
grain    business   which   took   care  of  the 


ed  upon  with  amused  tolerance  by  a  large 
segment  of  the  population. 

Sheriff  Cornell  did  not  look  on  things 
in  quite  the  same  light.  He  felt  that  he 
was  elected  to  uphold  law  and  order 
rather  than  regulate  the  underworld  and 
started  to  clean  things  up.  His  work 
was  cut  out  for  him.  Enough  persons 
were  making  a  profit  from  illegal  opera- 
tions to  place  every  obstacle  possible  in 
(Continued  on  page  4S) 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  7 


MERCED  MOVES  AHEAD 


The  City  of  Merced  can  well  be  proud 
of  the  outstanding  progress  made  by  its 
Police  Department  in  the  past  five  years. 
Improvement  of  its  headquarters  build- 
ing is  but  one  of  the  developments ;  how- 
ever, the  growth  and  expansion  of  the 
Department  would  not  have  been  pos- 
sible without  the  new  City  Hall. 


elimination  of  organized  \ice  in  the  Cit\'. 
Although  this  program  met  with  much 
opposition,  the  first  raids  were  carried  out 
successfully.  A  continLiation  of  raids  and 
pressure  against  vice  saw  this  type  of 
illegal  activity  dwindle  to  the  e.\tent  that 
all  types  of  organized  crime  are  now  non- 
existent in  this  City. 


figures  compiled  by  the  Federal  Bureau 
of  Investigation.  Coleman  believes  that 
an  alert  and  well  trained  force  is  neces- 
sary to  properly  police  this  progressive 
City.  He  insists  that  Merced  Police  De- 
partment be  represented  in  every  training 
school  in  the  area.  Sergeant  Ralph 
Shankland  has  been  appointed  Director 


MERCED  JUNIOR  TRAFFIC  PATROL  AT  COUNTY  FAIR. 


In  the  spring  of  1950,  the  new  Cit\ 
Hall  was  completed,  adding  six  new  of- 
fices and  several  storage  rooms  to  the 
Police  Department.  The  three  rooms 
which  formerly  comprised  the  old  head- 
quarters are  now  used  as  a  squad  room, 
officers'  personal  locker  room  and  combi- 
national identification  bureau  and  photo- 
graphic laboratory.  Space  in  the  squad 
room  for  the  town  patrol  headquarters 
has  been  allotted  to  the  Air  Police  serv- 
ing out  of  Castle  Air  Force  Base. 
Hydie  Takes  Over 

In  the  fal'l  of  1947.  William  Hydie 
took  office  as  Chief.  Upon  taking  oath, 
one  of  his  primary  objectives  became  the 


Over  a  period  of  three  years  the  De- 
partment personnel  was  increased  from 
15  to  22  men  and  two  additional  bu- 
reaus, Juvenile  and  Detective,  were 
formed.  During  this  time.  Castle  Air 
Force  Base  had  enlarged  in  area  and  per- 
sonnel and,  along  with  Merced's  increase 
in  popidation  to  approximately  17,800, 
the  patrolling  area  alone  is  over  four 
square  miles. 

New  Chief 

At  present,  Merced's  new  Police 
Chief,  ^Villiam  C.  Coleman,  who  took 
office  in  September,  1952,  is  hoping  to 
increase  the  numerical  strength  of  the 
force  to  the  standards  recommended  by 


of  Training  for  the  department  and  is 
himself  a  qualified  instructor. 

To  augment  the  regular  Police  De- 
partment, a  Police  Reserve  was  organ- 
ized in  the  summer  of  1951.  The  Reser\-e 
Corps  consisted  of  30  men,  each  of  whom 
has  supplied  his  own  uniform  and  equip- 
ment. These  men  were  assigned  to  patrol 
duties  upon  completion  of  an  extensive 
training  program. 

TraflSc  Survey 
Under  the  supervision  of  Chief  Cole- 
man,  a   traffic  engineering  survey  is  in 
progress     to     determine     the     necessary 
changes  needed  to  minimize  traffic  haz- 
(Continued  nn  page  47 ) 


Page  8 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


Garrity  Elected  In  Santa  Clara 


William  J.  Garrity,  47,  a  peace  officer 
for  18  years,  was  chosen  Chief  of  the 
Santa  Clara  police  department  in  a  City 
of  Santa  Clara  election  held  on  Tuesday, 
April  7. 

Garrity  won  the  office  in  a  three  way 
contest.  His  nearest  opponent,  John  J. 
O'Neill,  former  Santa  Clara  police  chief, 
was  defeated  by  only  84  votes. 

Third  man  seeking  the  position  was 
Ir\ing  R.  Cabral,  former  Santa  Clara 
Township  constable  and  now  a  Santa 
Clara  County  deputy  sheriff. 

Ex-Santa  Barbara  Chief 

Garrity,  former  chief  of  the  Santa 
Barbara  police  department,  polled  1710 
votes  in  the  balloting  to  top  O'Neill's 
1626  and  Cabral's  600. 

Santa  Clara,  a  community  of  15,000 
population,  had  6931  registered  voters, 
57  per  cent  —  or  3941 — of  whom  cast 
their  ballots. 

The  new  Santa  Clara  chief  of  police 
entered  law  enforcement  work  in  Santa 
Barbara  in  1931  as  a  patrolman.  He  was 
a  detective  sergeant  at  the  time  he  was 
named  chief  of  the  Santa  Barbara  de- 
partment in  1936. 

Mayor  Candidate 

After  three  years  as  head  of  the  depart- 
ment, Garrity  was  assigned  to  new  du- 
ties. He  subsequently  resigned  in  1941 
to  become  a  candidate  for  mayor — an  of 
fice  he  lost  by  about  1400  votes. 

After  short  service  as  a  special  investi- 
gator for  Santa  Barbara  County  District 
Attorney's  office,  he  was  hired  by  Bethle- 
hem Steel  Corporation  to  direct  its  police 
force. 

From  1946  to  1949,  he  organized  and 
directed  the  police  department  for  U.  S. 
Naval  Contractors  on  Guam. 

Returning  to  the  Coast,  he  opened  a 
small  business  in  Menlo  Park,  which  he 
later  sold. 

U.  C.  Graduate 

At  the  time  he  came  to  Santa  Clara 
in  January,  he  was  employed  as  a  public 
relations  man  a  national  private  investi- 
gation firm. 

Garrity  is  a  native  of  Colorado  and 
one  of  a  family  of  six  children.  He  at- 
tended schols  in  the  Mountain  State,  in- 
cluding some  courses  at  University  of 
Colorado. 

He  holds  a  teacher's  certificate  from 
University  of  California  at  Los  Angeles 
which  qualifies  him  to  instruct  police  sub- 
jects and  has  completed  an  FBI  training 
course. 


By  Anne  Hitt 

Garrity  became  chief  of  the  Santa 
Clara  department  on  January  20,  1953, 
when  he  was  appointed  by  Santa  Clara 
City  Manager  Joseph  F.  Base. 

Reorganization  Program 

His  duties  were  to  carry  out  reorgani- 
zation of  the  police  department  of  the 
Mission  City  in  line  with  recommenda- 
tions container  in  a  report  on  the  depart- 
ment by  O.  W.  ^Vilson,  dean  of  crimi- 
nology at  University  of  California  in 
Berkeley. 

Wilson's  report,  made  at  request  of  the 
City  Manager,  noted  that  the  Santa 
Clara  department  had  poor  distribution 


William  Garrity 

of  man  hours  over  the  day,  had  an  inade- 
quate records  system,  lack  of  suitable 
space  for  headquarters,  lack  of  suitable 
r.tandards  and  methods  for  recruitment 
and  lack  of  a  standard  operating  pro- 
cedure. 

New  System  Installed 
Since  Garrity  has  held  the  position,  an 
FBI  records  system  has  been  installed 
and  one  officer  assigned  as  records  and 
fingerprint  officer,  manpower  has  been 
redistributed  to  provide  greater  number 
of  officers  on  duty  during  evening  and 
early  morning  hours,  and  the  patrol  serv- 
ice has  been  completely  motorized. 

As  a  result  of  his  work  with  the  de- 
partment, Garrity  was  "drafted"  by  a 
group  of  Santa  Clara  citizens  as  a  candi- 
date for  chief  of  police. 


One  peculiarity  of  Santa  Clara  city 
government  is  that  the  chief  of  police  job 
is  an  elective  one.  The  development  re- 
sulted from  an  amendment  to  the  city 
charter  for  which  O'Neill  and  his  sup- 
porters were  responsible. 

Post  Was  Appointive 

The  police  chief's  office  as  originally 
set  up  in  Santa  Clara's  two-year-old  city 
charter  was  appointive. 

Under  a  previous  charter,  it  had  been 
elective  for  many  years  and  O'Neill  had 
retained  the  position  for  three  consecu- 
tive two-year  terms. 

When  the  new  charter,  drawn  in 
1951,  went  into  effect  on  May  5,  1952, 
O'Neill  failed  to  win  appointment  as 
chief  of  police  upon  the  expiration  of  his 
term  as  an  elected  official. 

Petition  Circulated 

The  Acting  City  Manager  of  that 
time,  A.  S.  Bellick,  appointed  as  Acting 
Chief  of  Police  Earl  C.  Perry,  former 
assistant  chief  under  O'Neill  and  a  vet- 
eran of  14  years  in  the  Santa  Clara  de- 
partment. 

Supporters  of  O'Neill  then  circulated 
petitions  for  a  charter  amendment  and 
waged  a  successful  campaign  to  restore 
the  chief  of  police  position  to  its  elective 
status. 

Culmination  of  the  campaign  was 
voter  approval  of  the  charter  amendment 
last  November  4. 

New  Petition.' 

The  city  election  on  April  7  was  under 
the  charter  amendment  provisions. 

Political  observers  in  Santa  Clara  view 
Garrity's  election  as  the  first  step  toward 
a  move  which  may  end  in  a  new  proposi- 
tion going  before  the  voters  to  amend 
the  charter  back  to  its  original  wording 
and  once  more  make  the  office  of  chief  of 
police  an  appointive  one. 

This  is  one  of  the  strongest  recom- 
mendations concerning  the  police  depart- 
ment and  its  operation  put  forward  by 
Prof.  Wilson  in  his  report. 

O'Neill  Veteran  Officer 

The  defeated  former  Santa  Clara 
chief,  O'Neill,  had  been  in  the  Santa 
Clara  department  since  1935  when  he 
was  appointed  as  a  patrolman. 

He  was  first  elected  chief  of  the  de- 
partment in  1946  by  a  narrow  margin  of 
six  votes. 

His  election  followed  the  retirement 
of  George  Peter  Fallon,  who  had  headed 
(Continued  on  page  28) 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  9 


Civic  Unity  In  San  Jose 


In  Chief  J.  R.  Blackmore's  trwenty- 
four  years  of  continuous  service  with  the 
San  Jose  Police  Department  he  has  never 
found  himself  a  busier  man  than  during 
these  past  weeks. 

As  a  cohost  with  Howard  Hornbuckle, 
Santa  Chira  County  Sheriff,  for  the 
thirty-third  annual  convention  of  the 
Peace  Officers'  Association  of  the  State 
of  California,  it's  easy  to  see  the  volumes 
of  work  necessary  to  produce  a  success- 
ful convention. 

Moves  Toward  Improvement 

Se\en  >ears  have  passed  since  J.  R. 
HIackmore  became  Chief  of  Police  for 
the  San  Jose  Department  and  ever-in- 
creasing steps  are  being  taken  by  him  to- 
ward producing  a  a  better  and  more 
efficient  operating  police  organization. 
Greater  facilities,  both  for  office  and 
prison,  are  to  be  available  in  the  near 
future. 


Chief  Blackmore 

An  interesting  feature  of  the  San  Jose 
Police  Department  is  the  large  percent- 
age of  police  graduates  of  the  San  Jose 
State  College  Police  School  working 
there. 

Professor  Blackmore 

Approximately  41  percent  either  grad- 
uated from  or  are  at  present  instructing 
at  San  Jose  State.  Chief  Blackmore  per- 
sonally teaches  "Police  Administration," 
a  required  course  for  all  penoIog\-  ma- 
jors. Traffic  engineering,  juvenile  delin- 
quency, criminal  investigation  and  field 


By  Bu.L  Walker 

work  are  other  courses  instructed  by 
the  San  Jose  City  Police  Department 
"profs." 

One  recent  major  change  made  by  the 
San  Jose  Police  Department  was  the 
combining  of  the  juvenile  and  detective 
departments.  This  move  made  available 
another  position  with  a  title  of  Chief  of 
Detectives  ( a  rating  higher  than  a  cap- 
tain). ']"he  new  set  up  will  better  coor- 
dinate the  activities  of  the  two  depart- 
ments. 

Auxiliary  Police 

Closely  knitted  into  the  police  depart- 
ment's activities  are  the  active  San  Jose 
Auxiliary  Policemen.  This  group  is 
headed  and  engineered  by  Director  E.  S. 
Pracua,  and  Chief  of  Staff  Leland  M. 
Baruck.  The  auxiliary  held  twelve  meet- 
ings last  year  to  discuss  business  policies 
of  the  department.  San  Jose's  Auxiliary 
Police  participated  in  some  sixty-two  spe- 
cial assignments  consisting  of  policing 
athletic  events,  parades,  celebrations,  and 
an\  large  gatherings  of  people,  greatly 
aiding  the  San  lose  Police  regulars  in 
1952. 

San  Jose  is  fortunate  in  ha\ing  Janet 
Hickey,  a  graduate  of  San  Jose  State's 
Police  School,  in  the  department.  Janet 
has  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  Degree  in  Police 
W^ork.  She  also  holds  the  distinction  of 
being  the  only  graduate  police  woman  in 
the  department. 

Unity 

An  outstanding  feature  of  the  San 
Jose  Police  Department  is  the  closeness, 
unity  and  support  shown  by  the  depart- 
ment of  San  Jose  and  the  citizens  of  San 
Jose  in  working  together  on  enforcement 
and  delinquency  problems. 

In  1951  the  Citizen's  Advisory  Com- 
mittee of  the  San  Jose  Police  Depart- 
ment was  activated  when  a  representatixe 
group  of  people  composed  of  the  Clergy, 
Merchant's  Association,  Parent  Teachers 
Association,  Dads'  Clubs,  the  Press,  ra- 
dio, labor,  veterans'  organizations,  city 
administrations,  the  district  attorney's  of- 
fice and  the  police  department,  met  in  an 
effort  to  aiil  law  enforcement  in  the  com- 
munity. It  was  decided  by  the  commit- 
tee to  act  as  an  advisory  group  only  and 
not  as  a  pressure  group. 

High  Point 

Perhaps  the  high  point  of  that  initial 
meeting  was  the  reluctance  on  the  part 
of  the  group  to  interfere  or  dictate  pol- 
icy to  the  police  repartment — thus  elimi- 
nating any  conflict  in  the  normal  func- 
tions of  police  activities. 


The  committee  decided  that  its  prime 
objective  would  be  to  aid  in  the  control 
of  conditions  that  are  deemed  detrimen- 
tal to  the  normal  way  of  living  and  to 
aid  in  the  suppression  of  criminal  activi- 
ties, corruption,  and  vice  conditions. 

Code  Adopted 

Ihe  committee  even  went  further, 
drawing  up  a  code  of  objectives  to  be  a 
pattern  in  the  principal  operation  of  the 
organization.     1  hey  are  as  follows: 

1.  Poster  a  closer  relationship  be- 
tween the  police  department  and  the 
citizenry. 

2.  Stimulate  interest  in  public  edu- 
cational programs  designed  to  pro\  ide 
to  the  individual  the  knowledge  that 
will  enable  him  to  protect  his  life  and 
property. 


Barton  Collins 
Chief  of  Detectives 

3.  Pooling  pertinent  and  factual 
information  that  might  be  used  by  the 
police  department  in  its  endeavor  to 
effectivelv  control   detrimental   influ- 


4.  Conveying  to  the  public,  infor- 
mation on  measures  that  have  been 
taken  by  the  police  department  in  an 
effort  to  control  vice  conditions  and 
criminal  activity  that  have  been  re- 
ported or  discovered  by  police  per- 
sonnel. 

(Cuntinued  on  page  29) 


Page  10 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


PISTOL  POINTING 


The  gram!  1953  season  opened  at  the 
S.  F.  Police  Range  at  Lake  Merced  Sun- 
day, February  15,  with  146  shooters 
having  the  time  of  their  lives  in  the 
glorious  sunshine.  Some  of  the  statistical 
personnel  were  complaining  about  the 
"minutemen"  and  by  that  we  found  out 
they  mean  the  men  who  rush  up  to  the 
windows  the  last  minute  to  purchase 
their  squadding   tickets.    The  ticket  of- 


By  J.  Ross  DUNNIGAN 

gang  of  experts  got  things  running  fairh- 
smooth  but  quite  a  few  of  the  shooters 
are  still  in  a  quandary  as  to  where  they 
stand. 

Dunnigan  Turns  Editor 
Just  a  quick  snapshot  of  the  score- 
boards at  the  Lake  Merced  Range  which 
attracts  the  shooters  after  each  match. 
1  here  they  stand  around  telling  some  of 
the    darndest    lies    and    exchanging    the 


Don't  Risk  That  Buck 

Talking  to  Gloria  Norton  Sunday  and 
she  tells  us  that  she  has  to  quit  heavy 
shooting  as  her  duties  to  her  family  and 
trying  to  keep  up  with  the  pistol  pointers 
is  a  financial  load,  and  physical,  too, 
that's  hard  to  maintain.  AVill  have  more 
to  say  on  this  subject  perhaps  in  the  next 
issue  of  the  Jourx.al. 

Of  course  one  cannot  save  money  with 


U.  S.  NAVY  PISTOL  TEAM 


fice  is  open  around  eight  o'clock  and  as 
the  matches  do  not  start  until  nine  it 
should  give  the  mob  plenty  of  time  to 
sign  up,  but  do  they  do  it?  High-nonny- 
nonny  and  a  hoop-de  do !  They  do  not. 
Hence  the  term  "minutemen."  It  looked 
for  a  while  as  though  the  classification 
mess  would  come  up  again  as  the  N.R.A. 
have  sent  out  new  and  varied  classifica- 
tions to  the  shooting  fraternity  and  some 
are  dillies.    Finally,  Pop  Dutil  and   his 


most  weird  alibis  to  be  found  an>'^vhere. 
Right  now  the  United  States  Revolver 
Association  is  in  the  midst  of  its  yearly 
national  matches.  These  matches  are  all 
pistol  matches  and  attract  teams  from  all 
over  the  nation.  The  winners  for  some 
years  now  has  been  the  team  made  up  of 
members  from  the  San  Francisco  Police 
Revolver  Club.  This  team  is  composed 
of  both  civilians  and  police  officers — as  is 
the  Revolver  Club. 


our  present  high  taxes,  but  that's  no  rea- 
son one  should  deliberately  throw  it 
away.  For  years  we  have  been  preaching 
to  the  shooters  not  to  challenge  a  target 
to  the  tune  of  one  buck  because  one  never 
(or  seldom  ever)  gets  one  buck  back.  A 
case  in  point  is  Evar  Roseburg,  who  did 
not  heed  our  repeated  warnings  and  fool- 
ishly challenged  his  slow  fire  target  in 
the  .22  match.  Nine  shots  could  be  found 
(Continued  on  page  22) 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  11 


AND  ONE  CREPT 


Lo!  so/Ill-  ivc  loved,  the  noblest  and  the 

best 
That  Tune  and  Fate  of  All  their  I'inlage 

presi . 
Have  drunk   their  cup  a  round  or  tivo 

before. 
And  one  by  one  crept  silently  to  Rest. 

Omar  Khayyam 

"Hey,  Doc." 

I  tried  not  to  hear  him.  I  looked 
around  for  something  else  to  do,  but  for 
the  moment  everything  was  quiet.  There 
was  no  escape. 

"Doc." 

His  helmet  had  slipped  forward  across 
his  face  and  he  didn't  appear  to  have  the 
strength  to  straighten  it.  I  knelt  behind 
him  and  slipped  it  back  so  that  it  pil- 
lowed and  protected  his  head.  I  reached 
for  his  pulse  automatically. 

"Doc." 

"Yeah,  kid."  His  pulse  must  have 
been  about  180.  He  was  a  baby.  Eigh- 
teen.  I  found  ovit  later.    Barely  eighteen. 

"Will  you  straighten  my  leg?" 

"In  a  while,  kid.  It  isn't  ready  yet. 
We'll  know  when  it's  ready." 

"Okay,  Doc.  But  please  hurry.  It's 
ail  cramped  and  twisted.  You've  got  to 
straighten  it." 

"^Vhich  leg,  kid  ?" 

"The  right  one." 

I  wanted  to  cry.  I  could  feel  my  stom- 
ach twisting  through  a  series  of  impossi- 
ble contortions  and  all  the  pity  and  com- 
passion the  war  had  left  in  me  welled 
up  in  my  throat  and  eyes.  I  couldn't 
straighten  his  right  leg.  I  couldn't  even 
find  his  right  leg. 

"We'll  straighten  it,  kid." 

The  first  shell  had  landed  right  in  the 
middle  of  eighteen  of  them.  The  first 
man,  a  corporal,  and  the  last  man,  a 
corpsman,  were  unharmed,  but  the  mid- 
dle si.xteen  were  shattered.  The  kid  was 
the  worst.  The  worst  of  the  living.  All 
he  had  of  his  right  leg  was  about  two 
inches  of  thigh.  The  left  was  splintered 
into  a  thousand  fragments  just  above  the 
ankle.  It  wasn't  connected  to  the  rest  of 
his  leg.   It  didn't  even  look  real. 

"Now,  Doc." 

"Later,  kid.  We'll  have  to  wait  and 
work  on  it  a  bit." 

"Is  it  broken,  Doc?" 

"Maybe.  You  can't  be  sure.  I'm  only 
a  corpsman,  kid." 

"That's  okay,  Doc." 

I  pinched  the  bicep  of  his  right  arm 
and  squeezed  another  syrette  of  morphine 
into  it.  A  full  half  grain. 


SILENTLY  TO  REST 


Rv  \Valter  R.  Hecox 


EDITOR'S   NOTE 

Normally  the  Police  and  Peace  Offi- 
cers' Journal  does  not  use  fiction.  After 
all,  it  is  a  trade  magazine  of  sorts  and 
as  such  has  enouijli  material  to  vsorry 
about  teilhout  taking  time  out  for  tlie 
•world  of  make  believe.  This  monlli, 
Iwwever,  we  are  making   an    exception. 

There  is  a  reason  for  the  exception. 
Last  month  ive  gave  our  inside  back 
cover  over  to  a  United  Slates  Treasury 
Department  advertising  promoting  the 
sale  of  savings  bonds.  He  ivish  wc  could 
do  this  every  month.  Bui  the  inside  back 
cover,  the  inside  front  cover  and  page 
tivo  are  the  only  pages  suitable  for  such 
an  ad.  They  are  the  most  valuable  pages 
in  the  book.  IVe  simply  cannot  afford  to 
give  them  away  every  month.  So  we  hit 
on  a  plan.  This  time  the  advertisement 
for  United  States  Savings  bonds  is  ap- 
pearing with  a  list  of  sponsors  on  the 
opposite  page,  H'e  are  grateful  lo  the 
firms  which  sponsored  the  copy.  Mean- 
while, it  seemed  that  we  too  should  make 
a  contribution.   Hence  the  story. 

In  a  sense,  this  story  is  not  fiction. 
Every  bit  of  action  which  appears  in 
these  pages  happened  on  a  hill  on  Bou- 
gainville Island  just  three  days  before 
Thanksgiving  in  1943.  It  is  necessarily 
condensed  and  must  be  called  fiction.  But 
il  is  not  exaggerated.  On  the  contrary,  it 
is  toned  down  if  anything. 

This  is  not  a  pleasant  story.  IVe  are 
sure,  however,  that  if  you  start  it  you 
will  read  il  to  the  end.  It  was  sold  first 
lo  Esquire  magazine  August  21,  1945. 
Shortly  thereafter  IP'orld  H'ar  II  ended 
and  the  story  became  obsolete.  Two 
years  later  the  author  received  permis- 
sion from   the  magazine  to  republish  it. 

The  story  is  no  longer  obsolete.  The 
same  thing  is  happening  in  a  different 
place.  Not  every  month  or  every  year, 
but  every  day.  The  end  of  this  story  will 
take  you  lo  our  inside  back  cover.  It' hen 
you  finish  the  story,  read  the  Treasury 
Department  advertisement  .  .  .  and  if 
you  do  not  want  this  slory  to  be  an  end- 
less one  .  .  .  BUY  THOSE  BONDS. 


Even  with  the  tan  his  flesh  was  color- 
less and  lifeless.  More  like  putty  than 
like  flesh.  He  didn't  feel  the  needle.  He 
didn't  know  I  touched  him.  I  felt  his 
pulse  again  and  it  was  thin  and  thready 
...  so  thin  I  had  to  concentrate  my 
whole  attention  on  it  to  feel  it. 

We  had  crossed  the  river  about  ten 
o'clock  that  morning.  We  were  sched- 
uled to  take  the  hill  by  three  o'clock.  I 
heard  the  colonel  talking  to  division  head- 
quarters over  the  walkie  talkie.    He  had 


a  voice  like  a  bull.  You  could  hear  him 
clearly  fifty  yards  away.  He  was  a  good 
battalion  commander,  but  a  noisy  one. 
He  was  talking  to  a  general. 

"So  far  so  good — Yes  general — three 
o'clock — we'll  be  there,  general — we'll 
be  there  if  we  have  to  fight  our  way 
through  the  whole  damn  Imperial  army." 

He  meant  it.  He  would  have  tried  it. 
He  was  an  old  Marine.  And  Marines 
are  either  bra\e  men  or  they  have  noth- 
ing to  live  for.  I  don't  know  which.  But 
they  act  like  brave  men.  We  only  ran 
into  part  of  the  Imperial  army. 

They  were  waiting  for  us  on  top  of 
the  hill.  They  expected  us,  but  they 
didn't  expect  us  on  their  flank.  It  was  a 
brilliant  maneuver.  We  went  smack  up 
against  the  face  of  the  hill  and  then  the 
whole  battalion  made  a  right  angle  turn 
in  the  jungle.  A  large  body  of  men  isn't 
supposed  to  be  able  to  do  that.  But  we 
did  it. 

We  waded  through  the  kunai  grass  on 
Guadalcanal  for  days  learning  how.  AVe 
lay  on  our  bellies  and  smothered.  Ambu- 
lances ran  in  a  steady  stream  taking  heat 
exhaustion  cases  to  sick  bay.  But  the 
heat  exhaustion  cases  lived.  They  lived 
to  make  a  right  angle  turn  on  Bougain- 
ville. And  they  lived  after  the>'  had 
made  it. 

Yager  went  over  the  brow  of  the  hill 
first.  Yager  was  about  six  feet  square 
and  he  went  over  the  brow  of  the  hill 
with  a  BAR  at  his  hip.  A  Jap  with  a 
Nambu  was  waiting  in  a  foxhole.  He 
opened  fire. 

The  impact  must  have  knocked  Yager 
back  six  feet.  Then  the  deeper  roar  of 
the  BAR  sounded  above  the  chatter  of 
the  Nambu.  Almost  immediately  the 
Nambu  was  silenced.  But  the  BAR 
didn't  stop.  It  roared  on  until  the  clip 
was  empty  and  then  spoke  in  shorter 
bursts. 

In  a  moment  Yeager  was  joined  by 
riflemen  who  added  their  fire  to  his. 
They  tossed  a  few  hand  grenades.  A 
dozen.  Maybe  fifteen.  Then  the  hill 
was  ours.  The  Jap  resistance  was  feeble, 
almost  non-existent.  AVe  had  ten  wound- 
ed.  One  of  them  was  Yager. 

When  he  was  sure  the  situation  was 
under  control  he  turned  around  and  fair- 

(Continued  on  page  16) 


Page  12 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


No  More  Sheepherders 


The  modern  Santa  Ana  Police  Depart- 
ment which  functions  efficiently  in  the 
Southern  California  toda>'  is  a  far  cry 
from  the  infant  organization  which  ex- 
isted almost  30  years  ago  when  Chief  of 
Police  Boyd  A.  Hershey  started  work  as 
a  patrolman  in  the  young  department. 

In  those  days  being  a  policeman  on  the 
Santa  Ana  force  meant  working  eight 
hours  a  day  seven  days  a  week  with  no 
sick  leave,  holidays  or  other  benefits.  In 
addition  to  this  the  officers  had  the  doubt- 
ful privilege  of  furnishing  their  own 
badges,  equipment  and  uniforms. 


ranking  officers  served  the  12,000  popu- 
lation city.  Total  a  total  of  64  men  pro- 
tect the  life  and  property  of  over  50,000 
people  in  the  city. 

7  he  roads  and  streets  have  been  im- 
proved, enabling  officers  to  answer  calls 
more  promptly. 

Varied  Tasks 

The  well  developed  coordination  of 
the  Federal,  State  and  County  agencies 
with  the  City  department  in  solving 
crimes  helps  make  the  department  more 
efficient. 

During  Chief  Hershey 's  long  career  he 


the  Santa  Ana  Police  Department  is  the 
patrol  division  —  the  division  which  is 
populated  by  the  well  known  but  little 
publicized  beat  officer.  7"hey  patrol  the 
streets  of  the  city,  both  on  foot  and  in 
automobiles,  suppressing  disturbances, 
giving  aid,  relief  and  information  as  the 
circumstances  require.  Ihey  are  the  city's 
active,  open  guarantee  of  orderly  govern- 
ment which  will  be  carried  out,  if  possible, 
by  persuasion,  if  necessary,  by  more  strin- 
gent means. 

Like   every   other    police    department, 


SANTA  ANA  TRAFFIC  PATROL 


One  Red  Light 

The  modern  communications  system 
found  its  start  then  with  a  single  red  light 
located  at  Fourth  and  Main  Streets 
which  summoned  the  officers  to  the  sta- 
tion. Today  radios,  teletype,  walkie 
talkies  and  call  boxes  take  over  those 
duties. 

In    those   days    18  men   including   the 


has  been  called  to  do  many  things  which 
are  not  listed  or  taught  in  any  criminology 
courses.  He  has  delivered  several  babies, 
rescued  a  woman  from  her  irate  husband 
who  was  chasing  her  down  the  street 
with  a  sword,  and  searched  for  the  owner 
of  a  tombstone  found  in  the  downtown 
area. 

Perhaps  the  most  important  division  of 


Santa  Ana's  patrol  division  is  the  back- 
bone of  the  force.  It  is  the  largest  unit, 
with  some  men  being  assigned  from  it  to 
traffic,  tletective  and  jmenile  bureaus. 

They  are  constantly  brought  into  con- 
tact, da\'  or  night,  with  the  citizens  whose 
life  and  property  they  have  sworn  to  pro- 

(Continued  on  page  54) 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  13 


WOMEN  PEACE  OFFICERS 


Policewoman  Florence  Wilson  from 
the  Arcadia  Police  Department  and 
President  of  the  Women  Peace  Officers 
Association  of  the  State  of  California, 
drove  to  Mountain  View,  California, 
and  presided  over  the  meeting  of  the 
Association  held  there  on  January  20th. 


Florence  Wilson 

The  meeting  was  held  at  the  Chez 
^'onne  Restaurant  and  a  delicious  dinner 
was  served.  Policewoman  Nancy  Bourne 
of  the  Mountain  View  Police  Depart- 
ment was  chairman  of  the  arrangement^ 
for  the  evening,  and  she  had  secured  the 
meeting  place  and  also  two  good  speak- 
ers, whom  she  introduced. 

She  first  introduced  Special  Agent  of 
the  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation  Ra\' 
Quinn,  who  gave  an  interesting  and  edu- 
cational speech,  and  then  she  introduced 
expolicewoman  Kate  Sullivan,  who  is  re- 
tired from  the  San  Francisco  Police  De- 
partment. Mrs.  Sullivan  gave  a  delight- 
ful talk  of  her  experiences  while  serving 
on  the  San  Francisco  Police  Department. 
Policewoman  Bourne  also  introduced  her 
boss,  the  Chief  of  Police  of  Mountain 
View,  who  gave  the  group  a  hearty  wel- 
come and  extended  an  invitation  to  all 
present  to  visit  their  new  jail.  After  the 
meeting  was  adjourned  the  Chief  of 
Police  and  Policewoman  Bourne  escorted 
the  group  on  a  very  interesting  tour  of 
the  jail.   Members  and  friends  who  went 


nn  the  expedition  to  the  new  jail  found 
it  was  e\erything  the  Chief  had  said 
about  it  and  were  impressed  by  the  up  to 
date  facilities  of  the  building  and  equip- 
ment. They  congratulated  the  Chief  and 
Policewoman  Bourne  on  their  fine  new 
facilities. 

First  Vice  President  Rose  Milestein 
extended  a  welcome  to  all  present  and 
asked  each  member  to  introduce  her  guest 
for  the  evening.  The  business  meeting 
was  called  ot  order  by  President  Florence 
\ViIson  and  much  discussion  centered 
around  two  items:  the  coming  conven- 
tion and  the  selection  of  a  name  for  the 
regular  bulletin. 

President  Florence  Wilson  also  ad- 
\ised  the  members  that  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  had  agreed  to  print  only  one 
program  for  the  convention,  and  that  the 
Women  Peace  Officers  would  go  on  the 
same  program  with  the  Men  Peace  Of- 
ficers. Following  much  discussion  it  was 
decided  that  the  AVomen  Peace  Officers 
Association  of  California  should  make 
an  attempt  to  ha\e  their  own  program 
printed. 


Margaret  Boyd 

Policewoman  Cecelia  Robinson,  chair- 
man of  the  San  Quentin  tour,  reminded 
members  of  the  tour  again  and  instructed 
them  to  be  sure  to  make  their  reserva- 
tions earh\  The  San  Quentin  tour  will 
take  place  on  May  9th. 


The  next  regular  meeting  of  the 
Northern  Section  of  the  Women  Peace 
Officers  will  be  held  in  Oakland,  Cali- 
fornia. 

President  Florence  ^^'ilson  thanked 
the  group  for  the  courtesies  shown  her 
and  for  the  support  they  have  given  her 
so  far  this  year.  She  asked  every  member 
to  chip  in  and  do  their  utmost  to  make 
this  coming  convention  a  memorable  one. 

FOLLOW  THESE  RULES 

-Motorists  feel  they  are  well  acquaint- 
ed with  the  rules  of  safe  driving  but  here 
are  a  few  simple  reminders  from  the 
National  Automobile  Club  designed  to 
make  motoring  safer  and  more  enjo\able. 

Obey  nil  traffic  signs.  Be  watchful  for 
them  and  observe  them  fully.  They  are 
placed  there  for  the  motorists'  safety. 

Passiny  on  hills.  A  most  dangerous 
traffic  sin.  The  double  line  is  for  the 
motorist's  protection  and  should  never 
be  crossed  unless  so  directed  by  a  traffic 
officer. 

Drive  slrnvly  in  traffic.  Sp>eed  in  ur- 
ban areas  should  be  reduced  to  cope  with 
surrounding  conditions. 

Right-of-ivay.  ^Vhen  a  question  arises 
as  to  priority  at  unguarded  intersec- 
tions, the  wise  motorists  let  the  other  car 
through. 

Sol/cr  driving.  Even  a  little  liquor 
dulls  the  mental  faculties,  blurs  vision 
and  slows  down  reaction  time. 

Pass  uhcn  safe.  Passing  should  be 
done  only  when  it  is  possible  to  do  so 
without  endangering  the  lives  of  others 
and  where  there  is  room  to  get  back  in 
line. 

keep  distance.  Keeping  a  safe  and 
proper  distance  from  the  car  ahead  is  a 
good  way  to  keep  out  of  trouble. 

Signal  akcays.  Arm  signals  should  be 
given  with  the  full  arm.  The  driver  be- 
hind may  not  be  a  mind  reader. 

A((7>  //;  line.  Driving  in  the  right 
hand  lane  and  using  the  left  hand  lane 
for  passing  onh',  is  the  law.  It  should 
always  be  strictly  observed. 

Sportsmanship.  Courtesy  when  driv- 
ing pays  big  dividends  in  safet\.  The 
Golden  Rule  is  a  good  safety  rule. 

Skidding.  A  danger  which  can  be  re- 
duced by  slow  driving  on  wet  pavements 
or  when  sand  or  loose  gravel  is  on  the 
surface  of  the  road.  Sudden  turns,  sud- 
den stops  or  too  quick  acceleration  can 
cause  skidding. 

Concentration.  Driving  is  a  full-time 
job  requiring  the  full  attention  of  the 
person  at  the  wheel. 


Page  14 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


OFFICER  OF  THE  MONTH 


liy  J-  W.  Wilson,  Sergeant 
University  of  California  Police 


On  February  5,  1953,  Officer  Robert 
R.  Ludden,  27,  of  the  University  of 
California  Police  Department,  Berkeley, 
California,  apprehended  and  placed  un- 
der arrest  Douglas  Eugene  Ivance,  the 
person  allegedly  responsible  for  the 
armed  robbery  of  the  Dwight  Way 
branch  of  the  Bank  of  America. 

Officer  Ludden  had  just  completed  an 
escort  assignment  and  was  cruising  in  the 
general  direction  of  the  University  Me- 
morial stadium.  He  stopped  his  patrol 
car  in  the  parking  lot  at  the  north  end 
of  the  stadium  and  watched  the  vehicle 
traffic  moving  along  Gayley  Road.  Pre- 
paring to  move  out  into  the  line  of  traffic 
he  slipped  the  car  into  gear  when  the 
dispatcher  for  the  Berkeley  Police  De- 
partment put  out  a  "stand-by  all  cars" 
radio  call.  Seconds  later  the  dispatcher 
transmitted  to  all  cars  an  armed  robbery 
report  received  from  the  Bank  of  Amer- 
ica, Dwight  Way  and  Shattuck  Avenue 
Branch.  A  description  of  the  bandit  and 
the  car  used  by  him  in  leaving  the  scene 
was  noted  by  Ludden. 

About  twenty  minutes  later,  at  2 :20 
P.M.,  a  1938  black,  two-door  Chevrolet 
sedan  passed  the  officer's  parking  point. 
The  driver  was  a  young  man  wearing  a 
blue  shirt.  These  points  coincided  with 
the  description  broadcast  in  the  original 
alarm.  Confusing,  however,  was  the 
fact  that  this  car  bore  license  plates 
while  the  robber's  car  did  not. 

Falling  in  behind  the  Chevrolet,  Lud- 
den pondered  the  possibility  of  the  plates 
being  placed  on  the  car  after  the  com- 
mission of  the  crime.  Pulling  up  a  little 
closer  he  noticed  that  the  body  of  the 
vehicle,  in  the  license  area,  was  wiped 
clean  in  contrast  to  the  rest  of  the  car. 
This  indicated,  to  him,  that  someone  had 
recently  been  tampering  with  or  had  at- 
tached license  plates  to  the  vehicle. 

Ludden  had  by  this  time  followed  the 
suspected  car  about  ten  blocks  and  he 
was  now  out  of  the  heavy  traffic  area. 
He  decided  that  he  would  stop  the  car 
and  question  its  driver.  Having  followed 
the  Berkeley  police  dispatcher's  radio  in- 
structions to  his  officers,  Ludden  knew 
that  none  of  the  Berkeley  police  cars 
were  in  the  area. 

Deciding  that  it  was  now  or  never,  he 
picked  up  his  microphone  and  called 
KMA  550.  When  the  dispatcher  an- 
swered Ludden  advised  him  that  he  was 
stopping  the  suspected  car  and  driver  at 
Euclid    and   Virginia   Avenues   and    re- 


OFFICER  OF  THE  MONTH 

Officer  Robert  R.  Ludden  be- 
longs to  a  police  department  which 
is  so  small  and  specialized  that  most 
of  us  do  not  even  remember  it  ex- 
ists except  during  football  season  or 
if  we  have  to  visit  the  University  of 
California  campus  between  seasons. 
Ordinarily  his  duties  are  to  patrol 
and  maintain  law  and  order  on  a 
college  campus,  a  job  which,  in  the 
most  part,  consists  of  seeing  that 
prankish  students  behave  them- 
selves. 

It  is  a  large  college  campus — not 
in  area  but  in  population — and  pa- 
trolling it  is  not  a  small  job.  Nev- 
ertheless, one  does  not  expect  the 
college  campus  officers  to  run 
around  catching  bank  robbers. 
Rowdy  raiders  from  Stanford,  yes. 
\outhful  students  whose  zest  for 
life  gets  out  of  line.  And  maybe  a 
burglar  or  so.  All  this  takes  enough 
of  the  college  officer's  time.  Bank 
robbers,  however,  are  a  little  out  of 
the  question.  There  just  aren't  any 
banks  worth  robbing  on  college 
campuses.  Not  even  on  the  massive 
University  of  California  campus. 
And  to  tell  the  truth  the  bank  rob- 
ber Officer  Ludden  caught  was  not 
on  the  U.  C.  campus.  He  came  too 
close  to  it,  though.  Too  close  for 
his  own  good,  that  is.  Apparently 
things  were  quiet  on  the  campus 
that  evening.  Quiet  enough  for 
Officer  Ludden  to  pause  and  watch 
traffic.  Quiet  enough  for  him  to 
spot  a  familiar  license  number. 

The  college  policeman's  actions 
from  then  on  were,  in  the  collective 
mind  of  the  Police  and  Peace 
Officers'  Journal,  above  and 
beyond  the  call  of  duty.  Ludden 
acted  with  rare  good  judgment  in 
a  situation  which  he  could  not  nor- 
mally be  expected  to  meet.  He  even 
extracted  a  confession  from  the 
holdup  man  during  the  short  inter- 
val between  the  time  of  the  capture 
and  the  arrival  of  the  Berkeley  po- 
licemen. The  Police  and  Peace 
Officers'  Journal  is  proud  to 
present  this  officer  with  a  Certifi- 
cate of  Merit  and  $50  defense  bond 
for  his  outstanding  action. 


quested  assistance.  Waiting  long  enough 
to  have  his  message  acknowledged,  he 
turned  on  his  siren  switch  and  proceeded 
to  make  the  stop. 

The  driver  of  the  suspected  car  im- 
mediately stopped  and  quickly  got  out  of 
the  car.  Ludden  drew  his  revolver  and 
commanded  the  suspect  to  stand  where 
he  was.  Searching  the  suspect's  person 
produced  nothing  but  lying  on  the  front 
seat  of  the  car,  under  an  army  type 
Eisenhower  jacket,  were  a  toy  pistol  and 
a  considerable  amount  of  currency.  Of- 
ficer Ludden  interrogated  the  suspect, 
who  admitted  his  responsibility  for  the 
robbery.  At  this  time  Berkeley  police 
officers  arrived  at  the  scene  and  Ivance 
was  turned  over  to  them. 

On  February  27th  Judge  George  B. 
Harris,  presiding  in  the  San  Francisco 
Federal  Court,  sentenced  Douglas  Eu- 
gene Ivance,  23,  to  five  years  in  Federal 
prison  for  robbing  the  Dwight  ^Vay 
Branch  of  the  Bank  of  America. 

Officer  Ludden  has  been  commended 
by  Captain  Frank  E.  Woodward,  Uni- 
versity Police  Department ;  James  H. 
Corley,  Superintendent  of  Police,  Uni- 
versity of  California ;  Chief  John  D. 
Holstrom,  Berkeley  Police  Department, 
and  by  Director  John  Edgar  Hoover  of 
the  Federal  Bureau  of  In\  estigation  who 
wrote,  in  part,  that:  "the  alertness  and 
initiative  displayed  by  Patrolman  Lud- 
den were  in  the  highest  traditions  of  the 
law  enforcement  profession." 

Robert  Richard  Ludden  was  born  at 
Berkeley,  California,  on  January  2,  1926, 
the  son  of  Helen  and  Everett  Ludden. 
He  received  his  education  in  the  Berke- 
ley schools  from  which  he  graduated  in 
1944.  His  father,  who  was  head  assayer 
in  the  United  States  Mint  in  San  Fran- 
cisco before  his  retirement  and  subse- 
quent death,  taught  Bob  early  in  life  to 
respect  the  badge  of  a  police  officer. 

After  working  briefly  as  a  grocery 
clerk,  auto  and  aircraft  mechanic,  he  ap- 
plied for  the  position  of  police  officer  at 
the  University  of  California  and  was 
appointed  to  the  force  on  September  25, 
1947.  He  has  attended  many  in  training 
police  schools  and  is  looked  upon  as  a 
"good  cop"  by  his  brother  officers  and  the 
citizens  he  comes  in  contact  with.  He 
is  married  to  the  former  Marceline 
Hibschle.  The  couple  live  at  1694  Ox- 
ford Street,  Berkeley. 


i 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 

TRAFFIC  TOLL 


Page  IS 


Traffic  accidents  claimed  620  lives  in 
1*552  in  the  nine  Bay  Area  counties,  ac- 
cording to  a  report  compiled  by  the  San 
Francisco  Chapter  of  the  National  Safety 
Council. 

This  traffic  figure  is  only  slightly 
lower  than  the  671  deaths  in  traffic  re- 
corded for  the  same  area  in  1951,  and 
clearly  shows  that  there  is  still  a  great 
need  for  safe  driving  practices  and  aware- 
ness of  hazards  on  the  part  of  every 
motorist  and  pedestrian. 

Fatalities  by  counties  for  both  >ears 
are  as  follows: 

1951  1952 

County  Poputatioit  Fatalities  Fatalities 

San    Francisco*..-     775,357  86  65 

Alameda*   740,315         155         126 

Contra   Costa* 298,984  81  68 

Santa   Clara 290,547         141  134 


San  Mateo 235,659  59  54 

Marin**    85,619  31  25 

Sonoma    103,405  38  50 

Solano    104,833  51  65 

Napa    46,603  8  14 

(*These  counties  do  not  include  any 
accidents  on  the  bay  Bridge  in  San  Fran- 
cisco or  Alameda  Counties,  the  San 
Francisco  on-ramps,  or  the  East  Shore 
Highway  e.xtending  to  San  Pablo  Ave- 
nue in  Richmond  in  Contra  Costa 
County.  This  entire  area  is  a  separate 
California  Highway  Patrol  Squad  Area, 
and  is  not  compiled  by  any  other  agency. 
Fatalities  in  this  area  and  on  the  Bay 
Bridge  were:  21  in  1951  and  19  in 
1952.) 

(**Includes  the  Golden  Gate  Bridge, 
including     San     Francisco     approaches. 


which  are  all   under  the  jurisdiction  of 
the  Marin  County  SHP  Squad  Area.) 

Major  cities  and  towns  in  these  coun- 
ties recorded  the  following  traffic  tolls 
during  the  past  two  years : 

1951  1952 

City  or  Town  I'opttlation  Fatalities  Fatalities 

San    Francisco 775,357  86  65 

Oakland    384,600  69  40 

Berkeley    113,805  4  14 

San   Jose 95,044  17  12 

Alameda    64,430  4  7 

San  Rafael 13,848  1  0 

Redwood   Citv  25,544  4  6 

San    Mateo 41,782  9  6* 

Burlingame  19,981  3  I 

Richmond    99,545  5  4 

Vallejo  70,133  2  3 

Santa    Rosa 17,905  1  3 

Napa    13,579  0  2 

(Continurd  nn  page  30) 


THIS  ACCIDENT  COULD  HAVE  BEEN  FATAL. 


Page  16 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


CYpress  7-1549 

CON -STEEL 
CONSTRUCTION 
CO. 

SAN  JOSE  -  SALINAS 
MONTEREY 

661  KINGS  ROW 

SAN  JOSE 
CALIFORNIA 


FOOD 

MACHINERY 

and 

CHEMICAL 

CORPORATION 


Executive  Offices 

SAN  JOSE 

CALIFORNIA 


And  One  Crept  .  .  . 

(Conlinui-d  from  page  11 ) 

ly  swaggered  down  the  hill.  He  pointed 
to  a  hole  in  the  front  of  his  thigh  about 
half  way  up. 

"Hey,  Doc.  Will -you  take  this  slug 
out  of  my  leg  so  I  can  go  back  up  there  ?" 

Across  the  hill  we  could  hear  scattered 
shots.  There  were  still  plenty  of  Japs 
around.  A  thin  trickle  of  blood  was  run- 
ning from  the  hole  in  Yager's  thigh  down 
to  his  ankle.  I  was  putting  a  bandage  on 
a  man  who  had  been  nicked  in  the  side. 
Further  down  the  hill  the  doctor  was 
working  on  a  man  who  had  been  hit  in 
the  stomach.   He  was  pretty  sick. 

"Wait  a  minute.  I'll  let  the  doctor  see 
it  and  then  we'll  send  you  back." 

"I  don't  want  to  go  back.  Just  take 
out  the  slug." 

I  looked  up  at  him.  He  was  serious. 
He  could  sleep  in  a  cot  that  night.  A 
nice  clean  cot  with  blankets  and  every- 
thing where  it  was  almost  safe.  But  he 
didn't  want  to.  He  wanted  to  stay  on 
the  hill.  A  mortar  shell  landed  back  by 
the  river. 

"It  may  be  cracked,"  I  answered.  That 
was  the  easiest  answer. 

"To  hell  with  it.   Take  out  the  slug." 

"Sit  down,  Yager." 

"Goddammit,  Doc.  Take  out  the 
slug." 

"Sit  down.  Yager.  I  won't  send  you 
back  up  there.  If  the  doctor  wants  to, 
that's  okay  with  me." 

"You  go  to  hell."  The  big  Marine 
looked  belligerent.  He  started  to  nio\e 
back  up  the  hill.  There  was  a  lieutenant 
standing  nearby.   I  looked  at  him. 

"Stop  that  man." 

"Why?" 

"He's  wounded.  Do  you  want  to 
waste  him  on  this  stinking  hill  ?" 

Another  mortar  shell  landed.  Closer 
in  but  more  to  the  left.  We  couldn't  tell 
xvhose  they  were  yet.  They  could  have 
hpen  our  eighty-ones  landing  short.  The 
lieutenant  shouted  at  Yager. 

"Come  back  here  and  wait  for  the 
doctor," 

Yager  turned  wearily.  He  looked 
comnletely  disgusted. 

"Yes,  sir."  He  sat  down.  Another 
mortar  shell  landed.  This  time  it  was 
shorter  and  to  the  right.  The  doctor  or- 
dered Yager  and  the  other  nine  wounded 
men  back  with  two  corpsmen  to  care  for 
them.  They  were  all  walking  wounded, 
and  they  all  looked  relieved.  All  except 
Yager.  He  just  looked  mad.  The  last  I 
saw  of  him  he  was  helping  one  of  his 
wounded  buddies  down  the  hill.  He  was 
masnificent. 

The  next  mortar  shell  that  landed  we 
knew  was  Japanese.  It  passed  directly 
overhead  and  we  could  hear  its  strange 


K AUFM ANN 
MEAT    CO. 

Wholesale  Meats 
Eighth  and  Bayshore 

CYpress  3-7312 

K AUFM ANN 
FEED    LOTS 

Quality  Cattle  Feeding 

Berryessa  Road 
P.  O.BOX  880 

CYpress  5-7250 

San  Jose,  California 


Phone  CYpress  3-1719 

J.  C.  BATEMAN, 
Inc. 

CONCRETE  CONSTRUCTION 

PAVING  -  GRADING  AND 

HAULING 

EQUIPMENT  RENTAL 

CRANE  SERVICE 

Member  Associated  General 
Contractors  of  America 

650  STOCKTON  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIF. 


Afril.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  17 


Phone  CYpress  5-5646 


A.  J.  PETERS  &  SON 

Mechanical  Contractors 


I  Plumbing,  Heating  and  Utilities 

i  Industrial  Piping 

!  534  Stockton  Avenue 

I  SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  5-2520 


GLEN  FOOD  CENTER 


1202  Lincoln  Avenue 
WILLOW  GLEN,  CALIF. 


CYpress  3-9599 


SMITTY'S 

The  Finest  of  Foods 
and  Cocktails 


349  W.  San  Carlos  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  4-0386  -  CYpress  4-6020 

AMERIAN  BROS. 

W^holesale  Fruit  and  Produce 


335  East  Taylor  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


whisper.  Ihey  can  say  what  they  want 
about  the  sound  of  a  mortar  shell  in 
Hight.  To  me  it  sound  like  the  flight  of 
a  quail.  It  landed  far  back  in  the  canyon. 
rhe>'  were  searching  for  us  blindly. 

Except  for  a  few  scattered  shots  every- 
thing was  quiet.  I  was  lying  flat  on  my 
back  between  a  couple  of  communications 
men  just  below  the  military  crest  of  the 
hill.  We  hadn't  attempted  to  set  up  a 
perimeter  of  defense  yet,  and  the  men 
were  all  pretty  well  bunched  up.  The\ 
were  tired  from  the  climb. 

We  didn't  think  much  about  it  when 
we  saw  the  flare  go  up.  We  knew  what 
it  was  for.  A  white  flare  indicating  that 
we  had  taken  the  hill.  The  shell  landed 
about  two  minutes  later.  It  landed  about 
thirr\'  yards  awav,  but  off  the  top  of  the 
hill.  " 

"Jeez.  That  flare  was  all  they  need- 
ed," said  one  of  the  communications  men. 
We  rolled  over  on  our  stomachs  and 
waited,  our  faces  against  the  dirt.  I 
thought  I  heard  a  groan. 

"Did  you  hear  someone  yell?" 

The  communications  man  shook  his 
head. 

"You're  dreaming.  Doc." 

"Maybe  I  ought  to  go  see."  I  didn't 
want  to.  I  wanted  to  lie  where  I  was, 
close  against  the  dirt  on  the  military  crest 
of  the  hill.  The  communications  man 
grinned. 

"You're  crazy  if  you  do." 

"I  know  it,  Mac.  We  were  crazy 
when  we  came  up  this  hill." 

"Sure,  we're  all  crazy.  You  stay  here, 
Doc.  I  might  be  able  to  use  a  corpsman 
any  time  now." 

"I  don't  know.  I  thought  I  heard  a 
groan." 

"Baloney,  Doc.  You  stay  here.  " 

Even  below  the  crest  of  the  hill  we 
could  feel  the  next  shell.  The  noise  of 
the  explosions  rang  in  our  ears  and  the 
dust  bit  at  our  nostrils.  It  landed  about 
fifteen  yards  away  through  the  bushes.  I 
didn't  have  to  wonder  this  time.  There 
wasn't  any  question  about  what  had  hap- 
pened. 

"Good  luck,  Doc."  The  communica- 
tions man  grinned.  I  gathered  my  legs 
under  me  in  a  sort  of  sprinter's  crouch 
and  paused  for  a  moment.  If  I  had  to 
go  I  wanted  to  go  fast.  But  I  didn't 
want  to  go.  I  didn't  want  to  be  like  the 
people  who  were  making  that  noise. 

"I'll  need  it,  Mac."  I  threw  myself 
over  the  crest  of  the  hill  and  started  back 
up  the  trail.  It  was  longer  that  way  but 
more  accurate.  The  deep,  sobbing  howls 
of  the  wounded  men  guided  me.  They 
didn't  sound  like  men  anymore. 


Phone  CYpress  5-9872 

Most  Popular  Place  in  Town 

THE  KNOTTY  PINE 

Manuel  Borges  -  Tony  -  Fraga 

Dancing  Fri.-Sat.  Nights, 
9  P.M.  to  2  A.M. 

Shuffleboard  Games  at  Their  Best 

728  North  13th  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  3-9741 


RALPH'S  SMOKE  SHOP 

RALPH    CARSON 


1818  West  San  Carlos 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  2-7234 

Wagner  Lockheed  Parts  and  Fluid 
Wagner  Comax  Brake  Lining 

Robinson  and  Parry's 

Reliable  Brake  Service 

Complete  Brake  and  WTieel 
Aligning  Service 

7  South  Montgomery  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  5-4575 

Compliments  to  the 
POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

Sally  Thompson  Pie 
Company 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  18 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


CYpress  5-2993 

CORRIGAN'S  LIQUOR 
STORE 


300  N.  Thirteenth  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


1001  -  66th  Avenue 

Phone  TRinidad  2-6288 

OAKLAND,  CALIFORNIA 

California  Concrete 

Products  Company 

CONCRETE  PIPE 

1660  Monterey  Road 

Phone  CYpress  4-9394 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  CYpress  5-8513 

CUNNINGHAM 
ROOFING   CO. 

WATERPROOFING  AND 
SIDING 

All  Types  of  Roofing 

Route  4,  Box   134,  Senter  Road, 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  4-5546 

GAGLIARDI  BROS. 

"Builders  of  Fine  Homes" 

REAL  ESTATE   •   LOANS 

Complete  Insurance  Service 

351  Park  Avenue 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


The  faltering  whisper  of  another  shell 
sent  me  flopping  earthward.  I  hugged 
the  earth  waiting  for  it  to  land.  Another 
one  I  hadn't  heard  coming  landed  about 
twenty  yards  below  the  crest  of  the  hill 
and  exploded  harmlessly.  It  was  dead  on 
the  range,  but  wide. 

"Doc." 

The  voice  was  coming  out  of  a  Jap 
foxhole  about  two  feet  to  the  right  of  me. 
I  looked  up  cautiously.  A  pale-faced 
Marine  was  sitting  there  with  a  dead 
Jap,  staring  at  his  chest. 

"I  think  they  got  me,  Doc." 

A  ragged  wound  about  four  inches 
long  ran  down  the  center  of  his  chest. 
He  was  staring  stupidly  at  the  blood 
flowing  from  it,  scared  stiff. 

"Who  got  you?" 

"The  mortar.  I  was  standing  at  the 
edge  of  this  foxhole  when  it  hit  and  it 
knocked  me  right  into  it." 

I  lowered  myself  into  the  hole.  The 
wound  was  deep,  but  just  over  the 
sternum.  The  bone  had  stopped  any  seri- 
ous penetration.  I  cleaned  of?  the  wound 
with  a  piece  of  bandage  and  reached  for 
sulfanilamide  powder  and  a  battle  dress- 
ing. 

"It  isn't  serious,  Mac." 

"The  hell  it  isn't." 

"You'll  live,  Mac."  I  tied  the  battle 
dressing  over  the  wound  and  reached  for 
a  casualty  tag.  The  whole  operation  took 
about  a  minute.  It  was  a  long  minute. 
Sixty  seconds,  but  they  were  life  or  death. 
I  could  hear  the  deep,  inhuman  sobbing 
again  and  footsteps  hurrying  from  it. 

"Doc.  For  chrissake,  hurry  up,  Doc. 
There's  a  man  back  here  with  both  legs 
shot  off." 

Standing  over  the  foxhole,  his  face 
covered  with  dust  and  sweat,  the  Marine 
was  trembling  like  a  frightened  rabbit.  I 
dronned  the  casualty  tag  and  stood  up. 

"Where?" 

"Just  around  the  band.  Hurry,  Doc. 
It's  hell  back  there." 

I  threw  a  parting  glance  at  the  man 
with  the  chest  wound.  He  grinned 
weaklv. 

"Go  ahead.  Doc.   I'll  be  all  right." 

I  ran  around  the  bend  and  stopped 
short.  It  was  only  a  few  yards,  about 
twenty  feet  altogether.  Twenty  feet  be- 
tween the  threshold  of  hell  and  a  blood- 
soaked  inferno.  It  must  have  been  a  full 
half  hour  before  I  realized  fully  what 
had  happened.  All  I  could  see  at  first  was 
the  kid. 

His  eyes  were  closed  and  his  mouth 
was  half  open,  and  he  was  breathing  fast, 
but  so  lightly  it  was  barely  noticeable. 
Lying  there  in  the  late  afternoon  sun  he 
looked  very  young.  He  opened  his  eyes 
when  I  knelt  beside  him. 


Phone  CYpress  3-9101 

SAN  JOSE  MEAT 
COMPANY 

The  Home  of  Shamrock  Beef 

Wholesale  Butchers  and  Meat 
Jobbers 

Plant  and  Office — Berryessa  Road 

Route  2,  Box  635 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Residence:  CYpress  4-2389 
Business:  CYpress  3-2577 

ENGLES,  BROWN  & 

BROWN 

Wholesale  Meats 

Purveyors  of  Meats  to  Hotels, 

Restaurants  and  Other  Eating 

Places 

455  Keyes  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  CYpress  2-8363 

LIVESTOCK  SPRAYER 
MFG.  CO. 

Manufacturers  of 
Automatic  Spray-Dip 

PATENTS  pending 

771  Coleman  Street 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


ARVID  M.  ERICKSON 

Vice  President 

HAWAIIAN  PINEAPPLE 

CO.,  LTD. 

barron-gray  division 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  19 


Office  Phones: 

CYpress  3-0424 
CYpress  3-1200 

J.  S.  WILLIAMS 

REALTOR 

J.  S.  WILLIAMS  CO. 

REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 

NOTARY  PUBLIC 

1905  W.  SAN  CARLOS  ST. 
San  Jose,  California 


Phone  CYpress  3-1705 

LA  VOIE  MFG.  CO. 

Harta  \'ertical  Blinds 

Venetian  Blinds 

Drapery  Cornices 

COMPLETE  RENOVATION  AND 
LAUNDRY  SERVICE 

2342  W.  SAN  CARLOS  ST. 
San  Jose,  California 


M.  V.  SOUZA 

Building  Contractor 
AXminster  6-2491 

173  North  Cypress  Ave. 
San  Jose,  California 


Charles  Hernandez 

Trucking  and  Farm 

Labor  Contractor 

Bonded  and  Licensed 

Boarding  &  Assisting 
National  Farm  Labor 

Phone  CYpress  4-6500 

1021  REGENT  STREET 

San  Jose,  California 


"Hello,  Doc." 

1  only  knew  him  by  sight.  1  hey  had 
told  nie  he  was  an  eightball,  and  he  prob- 
ably was. 

"Hello,  kid." 

I  pulled  a  thick  rubber  tourniquet  from 
my  pocket  and  reached  for  the  stub  of  his 
right  leg.  He  was  a  kid.  Seventeen  when 
he  joined  the  Marine  corps  and  away 
from  home  for  the  first  time  in  his  life.  I 
lifted  the  two-inch  stump  and  he  moaned 
loudly. 

"Take  it  easy.  Doc." 

"Okay,  kid." 

I  jammed  a  half  grain  of  morphine 
into  his  arm  and  tried  again.  He 
screamed  with  pain. 

"I  can't  stand  it,  Doc." 

"You  can  stand  anything,  kid.  That's 
the  hell  of  it." 

I  tried  again.  I  knew  I  had  to  lift  that 
stump,  but  it  was  an  awful  thing  to  have 
to  do.  The  sweat  was  dripping  into  my 
eyes.  He  screamed  and  writhed.  I  looked 
up  desperately.  The  chief  was  working 
frantically  about  six  feet  away.  I  wasn't 
aware  that  anyone  else  was  hurt  until  I 
saw  him. 

"Chief.  For  chrissake  hold  this  guy. 
I've  got  to  get  this  tourniquet  on." 

The  chief  looked  at  me  and  looked  at 
the  kid. 

"Give  him  a  shot  of  morphine  and  let 
him  alone.    You're  wasting  your  time." 

"I've  got  to  get  this  tourniquet  on." 

"He'll  never  make  it.  ^Vork  on  some- 
one who  has  a  chance  to  live." 

"He  has  a  chance." 

"\ou're  crazy.  You  know  your  job. 
Work  on  somebody  you  can  save.  That 
guy  is  as  good  as  dead." 

"Shut  up.    Dammit,  shut  up." 

I  lifted  the  stub  with  a  furious  jerk 
and  thrust  the  tubing  around  it.  The  kid 
howled  and  sobbed  while  I  pulled  the 
tourniquet  tight  and  knotted  it.  The 
chief  looked  up  again. 

"Give  him  another  shot  of  morphine." 

"He's  had  half  a  grain." 

"It  won't  hurt  him.  Give  him  an- 
other syrette." 

I  jammed  a  second  shot  into  the  kid's 
arm.  He  quieted  while  I  worked  on  his 
left  leg.  It  was  easier  there.  He  didn't 
seem  to  know  I  was  touching  him.  I  left 
him  there  and  started  working  down  the 
line  of  wounded  men.  They  were  easy 
to  find.   I  looked  up  at  the  chief. 

"Sorry,  chief." 

The  chief  grinned.  He  was  holding  a 
compress  against  a  Marine's  neck.  The 
cartoid  artery  must  have  been  severed. 

"It's  okay.   I  feel  the  same  way." 


Phone  CYpress  3-8858 

LInited  States  Mattress  and 
Upholstering  Co. 

For  the  "Rest"  of  Your  Life  .  .  . 

Custom-Built  Mattresses  and  Box 

Springs 

Flameproofing  -  Sterilizing 

Special  Rates  to  the  Police  and 

Peace  Officers 

2307  -  09  Stevens  Creek  Road 
SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Edward  Keeble 

Contractor 

Excavating  •  Grading 
Equipment  for  Rent 

CYpress  2-8458 

RT.  4,  BOX  64 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


LLOYD  NEWGREN 

Cement  Contractor 
All  Types  of  Cement  Work 


CYpress  2-6022 

1940  HICKS  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  4-8358 

Meet  Your  Friends  at 

ANDY'S  HILLSVIEW 

INN 

LORIE  and  ANDY  ANDERSON 

COCKTAILS 
Chicken  in  Basket 

On  Almaden  Road 

8  Miles  South  of 

SAN  JOSE,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  20 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


///.r//,  1953 


"LES"  SELLS  FOR  LESS 

ELDRIDGE  USED  CARS 

"LES"  ELDRIDGE 

AX.  6-0574 
2079  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  S-4778 


Furniture  Moving 


City  Delivery,  Transfer 
&  Storage  Co. 

"Nation-Wide" 

GENERAL  DELIVERY  &  TRANSFER 

Agent  for  Republic  Van  Lines 

F.  E.  SANDERS  &  SONS 

Owners  and  Operators 

612  WEST  JULIAN  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


GUSTAVE  DOMROSE 

MASONRY    •    STONEWORK 

Phone  CY.  3-89S4 
943Vi  TERRA  BELLA 

SAN  JOSE CALIFORNIA 

IVIAYFAIR  PACKING  COMPANY 

DRIED  FRUIT  PACKERS  AND  EXPORTERS 

Buy  SARATOGA  Brand  Fruits 

Phone  CYpress  S-5030 

P.  O.  Box  758 

Main  Office  and  Plant 

1582  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CLUB    TABU 

COCKTAIL  LOUNGE 

CY.   2-1266 
1401    SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE     CALIFORNIA 

LOUISE  HESTWOOD 

REAL  ESTATE 

Office  CYpress  5-8844 

Res.  CLayburn  8-4209 — 272  Doris  Avenue 

497  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE     CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  4-6565 

OLIVER  M.  JOHNSON 

General  Machine  Shop 
Manufacturing 

320  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


JOE  W.  DOUGLASS 

General  Painting  Contractor 

Telephone 

CYpress  3-2510 

890  SUNOL  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


He  looked  at  his  patient.  The  Marine 
was  half  sitting  beside  a  mound  of  dirt, 
his  head  cocked  to  one  side,  staring  pa- 
tiently out  into  space.  He  spoke  in  low, 
calm  tones. 

"How  am  I  doing,  Chief?" 

"Okay,  but  I  can't  stay  here  all  day. 
Listen.  I've  got  to  work  on  somebody 
else.  Somebody  may  die  if  I  don't.  Can 
you  hold  this  thing?" 

"Sure,  chief." 

"Can  you  hold  it  as  tight  as  I  am?" 

"Sure." 

"Okay.  Remember,  when  you  grab 
this,  you're  taking  your  life  in  your 
hands.  If  you  let  go,  you'll  bleed  to 
death.  If  you  loosen  it,  you'll  bleed  to 
death.   Do  you  understand  ?" 

"Sure,  Chief." 

He  took  the  compress  and  the  chief 
moved  on.  I  was  working  on  a  kid  with 
a  hole  in  his  arm  and  a  wounded  leg.  The 
wound  in  his  arm  was  huge,  but  he  was 
quiet  and  patient.  I  didn't  notice  any- 
thing unusual.  I  had  to  lean  over  pretty 
far  to  get  at  him.    I  didn't  notice  why. 

I  finished  the  dressings  and  looked  up. 
A  stretcher  bearer  was  standing  over  me, 
leaning  on  his  rifle. 

"Can  I  help,  Doc?" 

"Not  for  a  while,  Mac." 

"How  many  dead.  Doc?" 

"None.    Nobody  was  killed." 

"None,  Doc?"  The  stretcher  bearer 
looked  puzzled. 

"I  haven't  noticed  any." 

"Well,  how  about  that  fellow  you 
were  just  leaning  over?" 

"He'll  be  okay.  He  was  just  hit  in  the 
arm."  I  was  puzzled.  Together  the 
chief  and  I  had  worked  over  about  eight 
men  in  twenty  minutes.  AVe  had  four 
plasma  bottles  going.  The  stretcher 
bearer  looked  at  me  as  though  I  was 
crazy. 

"I  mean  the  one  you  leaned  over  to 
get  at  him." 

I  stared  stupidly  at  the  ground.  A 
Marine  was  lying  about  two  inches  from 
my  knees,  staring  straight  at  me. 

"Are   you   hurt,   Alac?"   I   asked   stu- 
pidly.   The  Alarine  had  blue  grey  eyes. 
They  didn't  blink.    He  didn't  move.    I 
picked  up  his  arm  to  feel  his  pulse  and 
noticed  a  great  gaping  wound.   It  wasn't 
bleeding.  Then  I  got  the  idea. 
"I  guess  he's  dead." 
The  stretcher  bearer  nodded. 
"I  thought  so,  Doc." 
I  sat  back  on  my  haunches  and  took  in 
the  scene.    There  were   five   dead  men 
within  a  few  yards  of  me.    Silent,  muti- 
lated lumps  of  flesh.    Four  of  them  were 
lying  in  a  row  touching  each  other.  The 
fifth  was  ofT  to  one  side.    They  hadn't 
made  any  noise,  so  I  hadn't  noticed  them. 


MARTINI   DRIVE  IN   LIQUOR 

PETER   MARTINI,   Prop. 

Legalized   Liquor 
BEER    •    WHISKEY    •    WINE 

Phone   CL.   8-3100 
2529  ALUM   ROCK   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


MIGUEL  R.  GUTIERREZ 

GENERAL   BUILDING  CONTRACTOR 
Build  Additions   -   Foundations  -   Remodeling 

CLayburn   8-3228 

239   SUNSET  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


TWIN  CITIES  MFG.  CO. 

AXminster  6-9050 
1175  CAMPBELL  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GEO.  G.  THOMPSON  -  Used  Cars 

"There's  a  Car  for  You  at  952" 

CYpress    7-1445 

952   ALMADEN  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

W.  R.  KALSCHED  &  CO. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTORS 

Phone   CYpress   4-4967 
201    SAN  JOSE  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  CYpress  3-4313 

F.  M.  JOHNSON 

REALTOR 

298  WEST  SAN  CARLOS 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


THE  SPORT  SHOP 

A.   C.   MARION 

GUNS    •    FISHING  TACKLE 
ATHLETIC    EQUIPMENT 

CY.  4-6815 

1172  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CY.    4-2S24 

HOLTONS  REAL  ESTATE 

INSURANCE 
NOTARY   PUBLIC 

85  NORTH   BASCOM  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Afril,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Pagf  21 


W.  M.    (BILL)    RINEHART 

CLayburn    8-5765 
141    GORDON   AVENUE 


SAN    JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone   CY.    4-9779 

We  Serve   Wonderful   Food 
and   Our  Coffee   Can't   Be    Beat 

JOHN  AND   ROSE  MATUSICH 

SUPER   BURGERS   OUR   SPECIALTY 
Juicy   Hamburgers   and   French  Fries  40c 

959  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


LARKIN  TILE  CO. 

Manufacturer: 
FAIENCE   FLOOR  &  WALL  TILE 

CY.   3-20S1 
16S1    POMONA  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


GUILBERT  BROS. 
Electric  Company,  Inc. 

CYpress    4-1656 
133   LOCUST   STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  CYpress  4-3232 

Carl  N.  Swenson  Co.,  Inc. 

General    Contractors 

1095  STOCKTON   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

LORENZ   TELEVISION    SERVICE 

TELEVISION    •    HOME  RADIO 

Calls   from  8  A.M.  to  8  P.M. 

For  Prompt  Service  Phone: 

CYpress    2-2564 

1043   LINCOLN   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

LERMA'S    SHELL    SUPER    SERVICE 

Phone   CYpress    5-1167 
14TH   &  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

MAX  S.  ABBOTT 

Contractor 

4601    ALUM   ROCK   AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


The}'  had  died  quickly,  painlessly.  Fer- 
ris, the  corpsinaii  who  had  been  with  the 
squad,  was  taking  their  finger  prints  and 
dog  tags.  I  looked  at  the  stretcher  bearer. 

"I  guess  I've  been  busy." 

"I  guess  so,  Doc." 

1  wandered  back  by  the  kid.  Ferris 
had  poured  some  plasma  into  him.  It 
had  helped,  but  not  much.  Not  enough. 
I  reached  for  another  bottle  and  twisted 
the  key  into  the  can.  The  kid  was  watch- 
ing me. 

"Doc." 

"Yeah,  kid." 

"What  did  the  chief  mean?" 

"Nothing,  kid." 

1  didn't  think  he  had  heard  him.  It 
didn't  seem  possible.  He  shouldn't  have 
been  able  to  hear  or  feel  anything  e.xcept 
pain. 

"Am  I  going  to  die,  Doc?" 

"Hell,  no,  kid."  I  fitted  the  needle 
into  the  bottles  and  shook  them  while 
they  mixed. 

"He  said  I  was  going  to  die.  Doc." 

"Not  you,  kid.  He  was  talking  about 
someone  else." 

His  body  was  thin  after  months  in  the 
tropics.  It  was  a  boy's  body.  Loose 
gangling  and  flat.  He  would  have  been 
a  good  man. 

"Have  I  got  a  leg.  Doc?" 

"Sure,  kid." 

Now  he  was  almost  dead.  He  was  the 
shattered  remains  of  a  man  with  a  heart 
and  a  voice  and  a  small  part  of  a  mind, 
but  that  was  all.  He  was  still  breathing 
and  the  heart  was  still  beating. 

"Are  you  sure,  Doc?" 

"Sure,  kid." 

I  couldn't  help  looking  at  the  stump 
where  his  right  leg  had  been.  That  god- 
awful, beveled,  flat-ended  stump  that 
looked  as  though  his  leg  had  been  cut 
away  by  a  pair  of  giant  pruning  shears. 
It  was  such  a  short  stump. 

"Then  straighten  it.  Doc." 

"In  a  while,  kid." 

"Now,  Doc." 

"Pretty  soon,  kid.  We're  not  readv 
yet." 

I  was  trying  to  find  a  vein  I  could  get 
a  needle  into  .  They  were  flat  and  life- 
less. He  should  have  died  instantly  like 
the  others,  but  he  clung  to  life  stub- 
bornly. I  felt  his  pulse  after  I  got  the 
needle  in,  and  his  eyelids  flickered  open. 

"Doc." 

"Yeah." 

"Stick  around,  Doc." 

"Okay,  kid." 

There  wasn't  any  place  to  hang  the 
bottle.  I  had  to  kneel  there  and  hold  it 
in  the  air.  The  mortar  shells  were  still 
landing.  Off  the  range  now,  but  close 
enough.    I  wanted  to  flatten  myself  close 


Phone  CY.  3-9831 

VICTOR'S  CLUB 

Cocktail  Lounge  and  Restaurant 

Dancinsr  Saturday  Night 

Package  Goods 

328  SOUTH   BASCOM  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


FLETCHER   MOTOR  CO. 

Phone  BAIIard  6600 

Res.  Phone  BAIIard  S752-W 

477  SOUTH   MARKET  STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ROBERTS  TYPEWRITER  CO. 

"The   Underwood  Agency" 


Phone  CY.  2-4842 

156  WEST  SAN  FERNANDO 

SAN  JOSE        CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  4-9656 

STOKES  LEADING  TAMALE 
PARLOR 

Hours: 
Week  Days,  8  a.m.  to  9  p.m. 
Sundays,  12  Noon  to  9  p.m. 

FOOD  TO  TAKE  OUT 

Jimmie  -  Addie  -   Julia 

53  NORTH   FIRST   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CY.  2-0592 


CY.  5-1616 


TERRA  COMMERIAL  CO. 

Sand    •    Gravel    •    Base  Rock 
Saratoga  Slag    •    Loam 


375  UMBARGER  ROAD 

SAN  JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Phones:  CY.  2-6078.  AX.  6-6234 

CHAMBERLAIN   PLUMBING 

CLAUDE  CHAMBERLAIN 

2466  PIONEER  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-5345 

CARVER'S  MOTOR  SALES 

GUARANTEED  USED  CARS 

L.  F,  CARVER 

255  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


GEO.  J.  CZARNECKI 
Shell  Service 

Phone  CY.  2-3494 

1598  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Page  22 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


Telephone  CY.  5-4482 

H.   F.  OLIVER  CO. 

Hardwood   Floor  Contracting 

MOORPARK  &  PORTER  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CRAFT  LINOLEUM  AND  CARPET 
SERVICE 

Linoleum,  Asphalt  and  Rubber  Tile 
Venetian   Blinds,  Window  Shades,  Screens 
Rugs  and  Carpets,  Plastic  Tile,  Formica 

CY.  2-2488 
420  SOUTH  BASCOM  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Insurance  Real  Estate  Loans 

CIMINO  BROS. 

INSURANCE  AGENCY 
PETER  F.  CIMINO 

CYpress  2-0314 
84  NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BERNARD   FOOD   INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Plant 
SS9  W.  FULTON  STREET 

CHICAGO,  ILLINOIS 

Plant 
1208  E.  SAN  ANTONIO   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


WADLEY'S  AUTO  SERVICE 

COMPLETE  AUTO  REPAIRING 

Body  and  Fender  Work    •    Wheel  Aligning 

Painting    •    Tune  Up    •    Brake  Work 

DWIGHT  H.  WADLEY 

Phone  CY.  3-2140 
126  E.  ST.  JOHN  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


L  .    B  E  RT I 

BAIL  BONDS 

24-Hour  Service  AnyWhere 

Telephone  CYpress  3-9136  Day  or  Night 

147  NORTH  MARKET  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


HIP  SING  ASSOCIATION 

637  NORTH  SIXTH  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DELL'S  STEAK  HOUSE 

ADELL  and  DAN  TOLLES,  Props. 
Open   1   P.M.   -.to  3  A.M. 


CY.  3-9767 

549  WEST  JULIAN 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


to  the  ground.  I  couldn't  help  looking  at 
the  shattered  bodies  all  around  me.  I 
didn't  want  to  look  like  them.  A  flat, 
metallic  ping  made  me  flinch. 

"Doc." 

"Yeah." 

"Those  are  twenty-fives,  Doc." 

Several  more  went  off.  They  sounded 
like  twenty-fives  but  there  was  something 
different.   A  hollow,  ringing  sound. 

"No,  kid.  Those  are  mortars.  Our 
sixties." 

"That's  good.   Give  'em  hell,  Doc." 

"Sure,  kid." 

The  other  patients  were  quiet.  I  made 
the  rounds  and  then  came  back  and  sat 
by  the  kid.  A  couple  of  hours  must  have 
passed.  I  thought  about  giving  him  an- 
other shot  of  plasma,  but  it  was  no  good. 
There  wasn't  a  vein  left  I  could  get  a 
needle  into. 

A  quartermaster  sergeant  came  over 
the  brow  of  the  hill  with  two  of  his  men. 
They  were  carrying  full  sized  shovels 
and  a  pick  as  well  as  their  entrenching 
tools. 

"All  finished?"  I  asked  them. 

"So  far."  The  sergeant  answered  ten- 
tatively. "I  have  a  hell  of  a  time  keeping 
the  boys  on  the  job.  They  don't  like 
handling  them.  They  don't  mind  whole 
men,  but  they  don't  like  picking  up  the 
pieces.   One  of  them  got  sick." 

"Somebody's  got  to  do  it.  We  can't. 
We've  got  to  work  on  the  live  ones. 
How  would  you  like  to  work  on  the  live 
ones?  The  dead  ones  can't  scream.  How 
would  you  like  to  work  on  the  ones  who 
are  still  screaming?" 

"I  wouldn't,"  he  answered.  "I'd 
rather  stay  away  from  them  altogether. 
(Continued  on  patje  60) 

Pistol  Pointing 

(Continued  from  page  10) 
easily  but  that  10th  was  just  not  there 
in  spite  of  the  loud  and  lusty  howling 
that  "the  10  in  tthe  center,  there,  must 
be  a  double."  Referee  Ken  Wilson  stood 
on  his  rules  book  and  gave  poor  Evar 
nine  shots — and  kept  Evar's  dollar  bill. 
(However,  Captain  Hank  Jacobs  of  the 
Highway  Patrol  put  up  a  buck  to  see  his 
81  and  found  he  was  right  as  he  really 
had  a  double  in  the  10  ring.  Ken  lost 
that  round.) 

Lost  Guns 
Les  Narvaez,  who  has  been  ill  for  sev- 
eral months,  arrived  with  the  Sacramento 
gang  Sunday  to  see  how  the  old  shootin' 
arm  was  a  doin'.  Phil  Atkinson  was  to 
leave  Les'  shootin'  irons  on  the  bench  by 
the  coffee  shoppe  but  forget  to,  so  Les 
ran  all  over  the  joint  trying  to  locate 
said   box  with   rapidly  increasing  blood 


Raviolis  Every  Day        Banquet  Parties  Arranged 

FIOR   D'lTALIA 

HOTEL  AND  GRILL 

MONDORA,   DELLA  MAGGIORE  and  POLETTI 

Phone  CYpress  4-5008 

101    NORTH  MARKET 

Cor.  San  Augustine  Street 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DALE'S  COMPLETE   RICHFIELD 
SERVICE 

LUBRICATION  EXPERIENCE,  12  YEARS 

Wash  or  Grease  Job  Free  with  Every 

50  Gallons  of  Gasoline 

Phone  CY.  4-7072 

COR.  STOCKTON  &  JUUAN 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  4-4114 


BUDDY'S   FURNITURE  STORE 

NEW  AND  USED  FURNITURE 
BOUGHT  AND  SOLD 

BEN  TYSON 


1688  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CY.    5-5944 


CY.   5-1498 


BERTI'S  SPRAYING  AND 
PRUNING  SERVICE 

Fruit   and  Ornamental  Trees 

Pruned  and  Sprayed 

White  Washing    •    Weed  Control 

Lawns  Fertilized    •    Roses  Sprayed 

925  EAST  JULIAN  STREET 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DICKMAN   &  KRING 

Contractors    •    Builders    •    Developers 

W.   B.   DICKMAN  and  CHARLES  U.   KRING 

Telephone  CHerry  3-1708 
2495  NEWHALL   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  3-5630 

GLEN  HAVEN  CEMENT 
CONTRACTOR 

ALL  TYPES  OF  CEMENT  WORK 
Free    Estimates 

P.  E.  CANCILLA 

585   MINNESOTA  AVENUE 
SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ECKEL   ENGINEERING 
COMPANY 

Manufacturers  of 
CONCRETE  PIPE  MACHINERY 

P.  O.  Box  528 
1297    EAST   SAN   FERNANDO   STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  5-6504 


SODALITY  MEAT  CO. 

WHOLESALE  MEAT  JOBBERS 
Beef   •   Veal   •   Lamb   •  Pork 


596  AUZERIAS  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


At^ril,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  23 


SAN  JOSE   STEEL  COMPANY 
INC. 

ReinforcinsT  Steel    •   Structural  Steel 
Steel  Sash   *    Chain  Link  Fence 

Phone  CYpress  5-0353 
195  NORTH  30TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

N.  J.  ANDRE  P.  N.  ANDRE 

Custom  Rebuilding  or  Motor  Exchange 

ANDRE'S  MOTOR   REBUILDERS 

205  MAIN  STREET 
Phone  1236  or   1238 

BRAWLE"!',  CALIFORNIA 

2810  MONTEREY  ROAD 
CYpress  2-7558 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

SHIP  BY  TRUCK  AND  SA\E  SHRINKAGE 

BRITTON   LIVESTOCK 
TRANSPORTATION 

California    •    Oregon    •    Nevada    •    Idaho 
CARGO  INSURED 

Phone   Day  or  Night:  CYpress  3-6393 

962  VINE   STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


BOY  -  JEAN'S 

INDUSTRIAL  WELDING  AND  FABRICATING 

Structural   Beams    •    Boilers    •    Pipe  Fabricating 

Tanks    •    Heavy  Equipment    •    Rebuilding 

Portable  Welding     •    Certified  Code  Welding 

E.  W.  BOYAJIAN,  Consulting  and  Engineering 

Phone  CYpress  7-1060 
1570  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


HEMPHILL'S  ASSOCIATED 
TRUCK   SERVICE 

MOTORISTS  WELCOME 

Phone  CY.  5-9959 
1194  BAYSHORE   HIGHWAY 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ALARIO   MUSIC  CO. 

Juke   Boxes    •    Coin  Operated  Machines 

24-Hour  Service 

CYpress   5-3707 
Res.  Phone:  CYpress  3-4070 
1320  FORRESTAL  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   CYpress  5-3289 


Plumbing    J  F    Service 

WATER   HEATERS 
FLOOR  FURNACES 

JOSEPH    FREITAS.  Plumbing  Contractor 
RTE.  3,  BOX  385A 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  4-7141 

FOR  FINE  LIQUOR  AND 

PRIME  RIB  FROM  THE   CART 

IT'S  THE 

PRIME   RIB  OF  SAN  JOSE 


Air  Conditioned 
1330  THE  ALAMEDA 


SAN    JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


pressure  and  a  near  case  of  nervous  ex- 
haustion. Les  located  the  box  in  time  to 
just  get  on  the  line  but,  knowing  the 
temperament  of  shooters,  we  know  that 
the  episode  cost  Les  at  least  13  points — 
and  too  bad,  too !  ( Not  to  mention  the 
loss  of  about  13  pounds  along  with  it.) 
Hill  Markel,  our  kodak  expert,  was 
bitterly  complaining  about  targets  10,  20, 
30  and  40  being  half  in  the  sun  and  half 
in  the  shade  due  to  the  division  boards  at 
each  ten  targets.  "It's  an  outrage,  malev- 
olent, acrimonious  and  all  that  there  stuff 
an'  how  is  a  guy  gonna  sight  his  gun — in 
the  shade  or  in  the  sun?"  And  so  on  for 
an  hour  or  so.  Glancing  along  the  lines 
a  few  moments  later  we  spotted  Bill 
shooting  on  target  number  10.  1  hen 
came  the  dawn. 

Spring  Fever 

Some  of  us  old  guys  will  never  learn 
that  when  that  spring  fever  bug  bites  it's 
just  a  gentle  reminder  for  the  aged  to 
remain  calm  and  let  the  youth  of  the 
land  do  the  springs.  Such  advice  was  not 
taken  to  heart  by  Sergeant  Karl  Schau- 
gaard  in  his  seedtime  of  life,  when  he 
tramped  merrily  off  to  the  snow  countr\' 
with  a  pair  of  long  skiis  over  his  shoul- 
der. The  officer  is  now  hobbling  around 
on  crutches  nursing  a  busted  ankle  and 
cursing  the  day  he  had  any  idea  he  was 
still  a  teenager.  However,  Karl  was  on 
the  lines,  crutch  and  all. 

And  we  certainly  didn't  like  that  crack 
from  Corny  Herb,  who  hasn't  been  to  a 
match  in  a  year  or  so,  when  he  said  he 
was  just  out  slumming  the  day. 

The  Olympic  Club  celebrated  its  40th 
year  of  pistol  team  competition  in  Feb- 
ruary and  celebrated  by  electing  Harry 
Plummer  as  the  new  team  captain  and 
impelling  force  behind  the  group.  Jim 
JVIcCue  has  been  with  the  group  for 
about  26  years  and  is  their  shooting 
Commissioner,  with  McVey  as  their  old- 
est member  and  still  shooting  after  32 
>ears  of  competition.  Boy,  and  that's  a 
long  time  for  anything,  let  alone  shoot- 
ing. 

Sax  Francisco  Scores 
.22  National  Match 

Master  Bill  Thomas 292 

Expert  Bob   Murphy 287 

Sharpshooter         J.  J.  Mason 284 

Marksman  1st      Harold  Jenkins 273 

Marksman  2nd     H.   Lisenby 239 

C.  F.  National  Match 

Master  Bob   Fortini 288 

Expert  \Vesley  Lim 283 

Sharpshooter  Richard   Gadd 274 

Marksman  1st      Bob  Franzel 274 

Marksman  2nd    Ed   Howes 240 


WILLIAM   VERZI   &  CO. 

GENERAL  PAINTING 
Industrial    *    Commercial    '    Residential 

CYpress  2-8684 CYpress  2-6760 

562  UNIVERSITY  AVENUE 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


SAN  JOSE  TALLOW  CO. 


Phone  Collect 

Office CY.   3-5707 

Residence — CY.  5-0528 

BERRYESSA  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ROBERTS  PLUMBING  &  BUILDING 
SUPPLY.   INC. 

PLUMBING  CONTRACTOR 

Plumbing    •    Heating    •    Sheet  Metal 

Free  Estimates 

CYpress   7-033S 
2280  PIONEER 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

T>es  Tubes  Batteries 


JACE<  OSBGRr:-  TiRE  SERVIGC! 

New    •    Used    •    Repairing 

Res.  CYpress  3-4960 
Office  CYpress  7-1392 
955  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


McCOY  SALES 

FORD 
Consul    •    Zephyr  Six 

Telephone  CY.  7-1285 

1899  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


GREENE  -  BIRDSEYE  -  NELSON 

TRAVEL  ADVISORS 

Member 

American  Society  of  Travel  Agencies,  Inc. 


Phone   CYpress  7-2121 
34  EAST  SAN  ANTONIO  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


AXFORD  ART  BRONZE   MFG. 
CORP. 

FRANK   FINLEY.   Plant   Manager 

CYpress  5-5922 

610  UNIVERSITY  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


JACA'S  LIQUORS 

1000  EAST  SANTA  CLARA 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Page  24 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April.  1953 


N.  D.   BRUCE,  Jr. 

VACATION    TIME  TRAILER  RENTALS 

$2.50  per  Day  and  Up — $14.00  per  Week  and  Up 

Tear  Drop  Cooking-Sleeping 

Camp  and  Small  House  Trailers 

Hitches    Furnished 


SAN    JOSE 


CYpress  4-4245 
832  COLEMAN 


CALIFORNIA 


RALPH   R.  BRYAN 

ORNAMENTAL  IRON  WORK 

Wrought  Iron  Furniture 
Tool  Shaping   and  Sharpening 

CYpress  7-0453 
1201   WEST  SAN  CARLOS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

O  &   R   RADIO  AND  TELEVISION 
COMPANY 

Jimmy  Rodebaugh's 

NIGHT  TV  SERVICE 

by   Appointment 

Expert  Repairs  on  All  Makes  and  Models 

CYpress  4-1835 
405  SOUTH  SECOND 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ANDRE  APPLIANCE  SERVICE 

Refrigerators    •    Washing  Machines 
Ranges    •    Heaters 


Office:  CY.  4-5025 

Res:  CY.  5-1560 

1864  WEST  SAN  CARLOS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  7-1948 

FRANK'S   FLOOR  SERVICE 

Furnished    •    Laid    •    Finished    •    Refinished 
Free    Estimates 

F.  A.  BULLER 
570  NEWHALL  STREET 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


o.  c.  McDonald  co. 

Plumbing    •    Heating 
Sheet    Metal 

Phone   CY.  5-2182 
1150  WEST  SAN  CARLOS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Contracting 


Repairs 


Heating 


ANDY'S  PLI13MQ]WG  SERVBGE 

ANDY    MOLICA 

Emergency  Calls:   CYpress  2-1656 
582  NORTH   NINTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

JOSEPH  W.  FOSTER 

COMMERCIAL  PHOTOGRAPHER 

CY.  5-4801 
214  SPENCER  STREET 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


.22  Timed-fire  Match 
Master  Bob  Chow 199 

Expert  Milton  Klipfel 197 

Sharpshooter         J.  J.  Mason 197 

Marksman  1st      Fred  Egger 192 

Marksman  2nd    Bill  Nickolson 169 

Camp  Perry  Match 

Master  Ed  Slaven 295 

Expert  Bob  Fortini 290 

Sharpshooter  Richard   Gadd 287 

Marksman  1st      Jack  Southern 277 

Marksman  2nd    Roy  Anderson 244 

.45  National  Match 
Master  Chas.  Boomhovver..281 

Expert  Milt  Klipfel 276 

Sharpshooter  Bill  Markel 275 

Marksman  1st      Larry   Kennedy 255 

Marksman  2nd     Cliff' Webb  .....' 222 

Aggregate  Match 

Master  Milt  Klipfel 1336 

Expert  Bob   Fortini 1313 

Sharpshooter  Richard   Gadd 1292 

Marksman  1st      Harold  Jenkins.... 1239 

Marksman  2nd    M.  Kresteller 1077 

Team  Scores 
A  Class 
1st  place — California  Highway 

Patrol  Team  #1 .' 1119 

2nd  place — California  Highway 

Patrol  Team  #2 1083 

3rd  place — Olj'mpic  Club 

Team  #1...; 1080 

B  Class 
1st  place — Mare  Island 

Pistol  Club 1010 

2nd  place — Peninsula 

Shooting  Club 1009 

3rd  place — Naval  Air  Station 

Helcatts 1008 

The  Oakland  Matches 

As  is  the  custom  at  the  Oakland 
Range,  the  sun  was  brightly  shining  on 
opening  day,  Sunday,  March  1,  1953,  for 
the  1953  shooting  season  with  over  185 
pistol  pointers  gracing  the  lines  for  a 
good  start  in  the  coming  season.  Last 
January  the  W.R.A.  held  their  annual 
banquet  and  meeting  with  a  goodly 
crowd  lined  up  at  the  tables.  During  the 
evening  the  winners  of  the  various  classes 
were  announced,  as  well  as  the  yearly 
three-gun  champion  for  1952 — and  if 
you  guess  anybody  but  Karl  Schaugaard 
you  are  wrong.  Karl  also  took  the  yearly 
Master  class  award. 

The  following  are  the  class  winners: 
Expert,  G.  Elliott  Murphy;  Sharpshoot- 
er, E.  L.  Johnson;  Marksman  1st,  Bob 
Murphy;  Marksman  2nd,  Frank  Fen- 
nessy,  and  Marsman  3rd  is  Fred  Biven. 

The  yearly  classification  and  informa- 
tion booklet  for  1952  is  in  the  making 
and  should  be  out  by  the  first  part  of 
April.  At  that  time  we  will  have  more 
dope  for  the  readers.  The  Class  A  team 
trophy  was  won  by  the  S.  F.  Police 
leani  #1  ;  Class  B.  San  Mateo's  Sheriff 


Phone  CYpress  5-4490 

NELSON   FURNITURE  CO. 

We  Specialize  in 

FINE  MAPLE  AND  CHERRY  FURNITURE 

Open  Thursday  Evenings  Till  9:30 

1050-1054  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   CYpress  3-9676 

JOE'S    PLACE 

LEON  TERRY 

We  Specialize  in 

GOOD  LIQUORS  AND  SANDWICHES 

BEER  AND  WINE 

551  WEST  JULIAN  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


A.  O.  Le  Fevre 


M.  R.  Grant 


SAN  JOSE   FRAME  AND 
WHEEL  CO. 

Wheel  Aligning    •     Repairing  and  Balancing 

Frame  Straightening 

Complete  Brake  Service 

CY.  3-0343 
355  STOCKTON  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-6272 

CENTRAL  CONCRETE  SUPPLY 
CO..  INC. 

CARMEN  ALBANESE 
Concrete    •    Sand    •   Rock    •    Cement 

610   McKENDRIE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  3-5763 


ALAMEDA    MOTEL 

MISS  EDITH  A.  M.  CARLSON.  Owner 

Furnished  with  Beauty  Rest  Mattresses 
Located  inside  city  limits,  westside  on 

Highway  U.  S.  101   and  State  17 
1050  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

P.  M.  MATICH,  Manager  Res.  244  Race  St. 

CYpress  4-8354 


SAN  JOSE  CONCRETE  PIPE  CO. 

High  Pressure  Irrigation  Pipe 
Culvert    and  Sewer  Pipe 

Phone  CYpress   5-9133 
560  STOCKTON  AVENUE 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


A  .     D  .     CLINK 

5c  -  lOc  -   ISc  VARIETY 
$1.00  and  Up 


1897  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

C.  I.  "Slim*'  Hardcastle  J.  Myron   Hardcastle 

HARDCASTLE  BROTHERS 

Frame  and  Axle  Work   •    Auto  Tops   •    Towing 

Radiator,  Fender  and  Body  Works 

Auto  Painting 

Telephone  CYpress  2-1488 
187  NORTH  SAN  PEDRO  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


I 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  25 


WHY    SUFFER? 

Hours   10  A.M.   to  7    P.M. 

Sundays   10  A.M.  to  12  Noon 

CYpress    5-7513 

Special   Herbs   for  Each  Ailment 
Dependable    Service  Over    3  0    Years 

PEKIN   HERB  CO. 

547   NORTH    THIRD   STREET 

Between  Jackson   &  Empire  Streets 

S.-\N    JOSE  CALIFORNI.A 

Phone   CY.    2-1482 


KRYGER'S  CAR  POLISHING 

ORVILLE    KR'lCER.  Owner  and   Manager 


549   PARK   AVENUE 


S.AN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Office  CYpress  3-3326  Res.  CYpress  2-9856 

C.  A.  GUSSMAN 

TRUCKING  CONTRACTOR 

Excavating  and   Grading 

Rotavating    •    Top  Soil    •    Fill  Dirt    •    Loam 

Free    Estimates 

1033  THORNTON  WAY 

S.AN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

WM.  EHLERT  PLUMBING  CO. 

Telephone  CYpress   4-2794 

FRED  W.  EHLERT 
Res.   Phone  Cypress  3-0086 

ELSIE  EHLERT  MARSOLl 
Res.   Phone  CYpress   5-2493 

956  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BERRYMAN   PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers  and  Distributors 

Automotive  Chemicals  for  35  Years 

RAY  STENHOUSE 

Direct  Factory  Representative 

CYpress  4-4237 
1868  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DAN   DORSA  -  Paving  Confracfor 

CY.  5-3818  or  CY-3-5989 
1135  NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DAN    CAPUTO 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

Phone  AXminster  6-3538 

2711   MOORPARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  4-5045  Hot  Food  to  Take  Out 

Italian   Hotel  and   Restaurant 

Ravioli  Every   Day 

First  Class   Service   •    Banquet   Room  for  Parties 

Serving   from   11:00  A.M.  to  9:0O  P.M. 

AL   FRANZINO    •    AL   \ISCA 

Downstairs 

175  SAN  AUGUSTINE   STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNI 


Office;  Class  C.  Oakland  Police  leam, 
ami  Class  D  by  the  Alameda  Police 
Team.  During  1952  our  old  friend  of 
the  Oakland  Police  Department,  "Spike" 
Spiken,  finished  his  eighth  year  of  com- 
petition without  a  miss  and  the  Oakland 
Club  was  in  a  quandary  as  to  a  suitable 
award  for  him.  .'Vs  of  this  writing  noth- 
ing has  been  settled.  However,  Spike 
fell  by  the  wayside  on  the  opening  day 
of  the  1953  season  and  spent  the  day  in 
bed  with  the  FLU.  His  temperature 
was  high  but  not  as  high  as  his  blood 
pressure  because  of  his  being  unable  to 
get  to  the  matches. 

Hatch  to  Return 

Cliff  Hatch,  retired  last  year  from  the 
Oakland  Police  Department,  sez  he  will 
be  back  with  the  gang  in  the  next  couple 
of  months.  He  has  been  so  busy  with  his 
veterans  organizations  he  hasn't  had  time 
to  do  much  shooting. 

AVarrant  Officer  Jack  Goodall,  of  the 
L  .  S.  .Marine  team,  has  been  transferred 
to  the  Pentagon  in  AVashington.  We 
understand  he  is  very  reluctant  to  leave 
his  place  here  on  the  coast  but  duty  is 
duty  and  Jack  has  to  went.  AVe  know 
that  his  steady  shooting  is  going  to  be 
missed  by  his  teammates. 

Joe  de  Mello,  of  the  Oakland  Police 
Department,  has  been  under  the  weather 
for  the  past  couple  or  three  months  but, 
being  a  nutty  shooter,  he  is  out  on  the 
lines  every  match  and  states  that  the 
time  he  quits  will  be  when  they  pack  him 
off  in  one  of  those  wooden  boxes  so  popu- 
lar with  the  undertakers. 

Santa  Cruz  Club 

The  Santa  Cruz  Handgun  Club  had 
a  dozen  or  so  of  their  newly  organized 
members  at  the  shoot,  with  a  ladies'  team 
to  boot.  The  ladies  on  the  team  are 
Alma  Bellera,  Lois  Ackerman,  Jessie 
Fyree  and  \  vonne  Geisert.  Shooting  in- 
structions are  under  the  able  hands  of 
Sgt.  Jack  Bellera  of  Ford  Ord  who  ex- 
pects to  have  the  Club  in  active  com- 
petition soon.  Might  we  call  your  at- 
tention to  the  fact  they  are  a  "handgun" 
club — nor  a  pistol  club! 

There  is  great  rivalry  between  Ray 
Freeman  and  Frank  Dunphy,  both  of 
the  S.F.P.D.  Sunday  when  Ray  wasn't 
on  the  lines  ready  for  the  first  string  on 
the  50-yard  line  did  Frank  try  and  find 
him  ?  And  was  Frank  glad  to  tell  us 
that  we  would  have  a  new  member  for 
the  Siesta  Club?  And  was  Frank  glad 
Ray  forgot  as  it  gave  Frank  a  better 
chance?  Yes,  my  friends,  it's  a  friendly 
feud.  Rut  when  Ray  finally  woke  up  and 
got  on  the  lines  it  so  burned  Frank  he 
didn't  do  so  well.  Those  friends. 

New  High 

And  Carl  Reigelman  was  so  tickled 
in    this   match   on    the   50-vard    line   he 


Estimates  Free  Phone  CYpress  2-7430 

GEORGE  BELL 

General  Contractor.  Specializing  in 

Composition  •  Tile  •  Asbestos  •  Siding  Shingles 

142  SOUTH  19TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-9694 

BRUNTS  TAP   ROOM 

Cocktails 
1041   SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S  AUTO  DRIVING  SCHOOL 

Dual  Controlled  Cars 

This  Is  Our  Business — Not  a  Side  Line 

CY.  3-1443 

65  NOTRE  DAME  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BOURDET  FRENCH   LAUNDRY 

Tclophone  CYpress  2-5515 

1119  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

C.  Bozzo.  Meat  Dept.  J.  Nasello,  Groceries 

Com;3!ete  Line  of  Quality  Meats 

Af][3  GReCER!E5 

Phone  Col.  4575 
686  FREVOST,  COR.  GRANT 

.IAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


MORWEAR   PAINT  STORE 

Distributors  of 
MORWEAR  PAINT  PRODUCTS 

Phone   CYpress  2-3393 
Res.  Phone  CYpress  2  5051 

CLYDE  HICKS 

1349  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


J.  W.  MARTIN 

Home  Builder    •    General  Contractor 

Phone  AX.  6-8971 
3240  WILLIAMS  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  3-8912 


YOUNGSTOWN  ^^jgjg^"         Refrigerators 
KITCHENS  ^'^        Stoves    •    Appliances 

BUCK  CANEP.A      LOUIS  E.   CANEP.A 

BUCK'S  PROPANE -BUTANE 
SERVICE 

Natural  Gas  and  Butane  Equipment 
1102   BAYSHORE   AT   12TH 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


STONE  AND   SCHULTE 

REALTORS 
Insurance     •    Loans 

CYpress  2-5130 

435  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  3-0497 

BIDDLE  ROOFING 

HAROLD  BIDDLE.  Prop. 

DA\'1D   BIDDLE.    Mgr. 

Wood    '    Shingles    •    Composition 

Free  Estimates 

LICENSED   AND    BONDED 

Rt.  3,  Box  460-C 

McLaughlin  avenue 

san  jose  california 


Page  26 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


CY.   3-8238 

E.    (Eddie)    DAHL 

Specializing  in  General  Repairs 

All  Makes  and  Models 

1018  ALMADEN  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Coast  Line  Truck  Service,   Inc. 

Daily  Service  Between  Los  Angeles 

and  San  Francisco  Bay  Points 

Telephone   Cypress    2-6632 

NINTH  AND  BAYSHORE 

SAN   JOSE      CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  2-0956 

CHERRY'S  PLUMBING  SERVICE 

Heating  and  Repairs 
929  NORTH  SIXTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-4828 

WAGNER  BOILER  WORKS 

Complete  Boiler  Repairs 

Certified   Welding  Service 

1565  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


MAC'S   MUFFLER  SERVICE 

CY.  3-4541 
18  SOUTH  EIGHTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CLARENCE  HARRIS 

General  Electric  Appliances 

CYpress  5-2068 

425  SOUTH  BASCOM  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  3-6190 

COMBS  CAR  CO. 

Fine  Automobiles 
1480  WEST  SAN  CARLOS 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


CHADSEY'S  AUT©  UPHOLSTERY 

Seat  Covers    •    Sport  Tops 
Truck  and  Tractor  Cushions 

CY.  5-6552 
633  NORTH  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CARDONA'S 

For  Better  Shoe  Repair  Service 

CYpress   2-3083 

51  WEST  SAN  FERNANDO 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

SAs.]  JeSE  De©[(  SHGP 

BOOKS  F0:«  EVERY  KIND  OF  READER 

Fiction    •    Art    '    Science    •    Music 

CY.  5-5513 

119  east  san  fernando  street 

san  jose  california 

CM8AR^M©ljTE'S 

CASH  and  CARRY  MARKET 

Phone  CYpress  5-0943 
e09  NORTH  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

E30WAR1D  CHAPP  -  MCATG 

Busy  Drive-In  Market 

CY.  4-1185 

1090  EAST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


KEN'S  PINE  INN 


CY.  3-7618 
255  SOUTH  SECOND  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  4-0771 

JACK  CASTRO 

Automobile  Repairing 

Ignition  and  Electrical  Trouble  Shooting 

411  SOUTH  SECOND  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


never  let  up  talking  about  it  all  day.  Carl 
(■[aims  he  got  all  10  shots  on  the  paper 
and  has  thus  established  a  new  high  for 
himself — and  a  tough  one  for  us  to  beat! 

Our  condolences  to  Vern  Clayton  and 
his  automobile  that  he  so  gallantly 
busted  up  on  the  way  over  to  the  matches. 
We  could  also  offer  our  condolences  to 
Al  Heath,  the  .45  expert,  as  he  an- 
nounced he  was  married  just  a  few  days 
ago.  It's  bad  enough  to  be  a  shooter  but 
getting  married  in  the  bargain  definitely 
proves  "how  silly  can  one  get." 

And  we  might  say  that  Ray  Felton 
was  elected  president  of  the  W.R.A.  for 
1953  and  Phil  Lander  as  first  vice  and 
Tom  Monahan  as  secretary. 

Oakland  Scores 

C.F.  Short  Course 

Master  Wes  Lim 288 

Expert  J.   Green 280 

Sharpshooter         K.   Risley 271 

Marksman  1st      H.   E.  Jenkins. 275 

Marksman  2nd  H.  S.  McDonald.  .263 
Marksman  3rd     M.    Johnson 236 

C.F.  Camp  Perry 

Master  M.    Klipfel 296 

Expert  R.    McDermott 287 

Sharpshooter  Dick  Gadd 288 

Marksman  1st      Tony   Daily 283 

Marksman  2nd    Vin    Bianchini 269 

Marksman  3rd     M.  Johnson 258 

.22  National  Match 

Master  M.    Klipfel 291 

Expert  J.   Green 291 

Sharpshooter         L.    Richardson 280 

Marksman   1st      G.    Colville 278 

Marksman  2nd    J.  Holmes 277 

Marksman  3rd     J.   Lange 261 

.22  Timed  Fire 

Master  R.   Ickes 199 

Expert  J.    Fiske 196 

Sharpshooter  F.   Egger 197 

Marksman   1st      J.   Goodall 193 

Marksman  2nd    Alma  Bellara 192 

Marksman  3rd     M.  Johnson 182 

.45  National  Match 
Master  Karl   Schaugaard....285 

Expert  M.    Klipfel 282 

Sharpshooter         W.   Martens 264 

Marksman  1st      J.  Durst 269 

Marksman  2nd     G.    Colville 264 

Marksman  3rd     L.  Engstrom 235 

A ggregate  Match 

Master  M.    Klipfel 864 

Expert  J.    Green 852 

Sharpshooter  Dick   Gadd 837 

Marksman  1st      H.    Je'ikens 814 

Marksman  2nd    H.  McDonald 783 

Marksman  3rd     M.  Johnson 753 

Team  Scores 
1st  place — California  Highway 

Patrol  Team   #1 .' 1163 

2ndplace — Oakland  Pistol  Club 

Team   #1 1139 

3rd  place — California  Highway 

Patrol  Team   #2 1129 


Phone  CY.  3-9664 

JIM'S  HIGH   LOW 

The  Place  to  Go 

171   EAST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  2-8498 

Coonley's  Welding  Service 

Block  and  Head  Welding    •    Valve  Seats 

At  Your  Shop  Without  Removing  Motor 

25  DUANE  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CARL'S  SIGNAL   SERVICE 


SAN   JOSE 


199  RACE 


CALIFORNIA 


SAM   BARRANTI 

"Tropical  Fruits" 

We  Carry  a  Full  Line  of  Produce  and  Vegetables 

CY.  4-7230;   CY.  2-5634 

615  DRAKE  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Willys 


B.    E.    STOKES 


Jeeps 


New  and  Used  Cars 

Phone   CYpress  5-1105 

38  SOUTH  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  Columbia  7773-J 

COONEY  TRAILER  TERRACE 

Laundry  Facilities 
2884  MONTEREY  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FERRARO'S  GROCERY 

CY.  5-9616 
1481    POMONA 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Bergmonn's   Department  Store 

CY.  5-5056 

1365  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CIRAULO  SMOKE  SHOP 

CY.  5-9443 
998  NORTH  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  4-5329  Free  Pick-Up  Service 

ROLPH   RADIATOR  SERVICE 

Wholesale  and  Retail  Distributors 
Harrison   Radiators 
215  POST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

COLEMAN  -  STOGNER 

Rug  &  Upholstery    •    Cleaners  &  Dyers 
Phone  CYpress  4-2851 
73  LOCUST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Free  Estimates  Given  Phone  CYpress  5-8070 

T.  M.  COSTA   ROOFING  CO. 

Roofing  of  Many  Types 

481  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

JOHNSON   BROS. 

DISTRIBUTING  CO. 

CY.  2-2551 

976  NORTH  FOURTH  STREET 

SaN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


MARK   MOTORS 

CY.  7-1720 

1685  EAST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  27 


FARM    FRESH   EGGS 


SAN   JOSE 


WHOLESALE 

Phone  CY.  4-8995 

635  STOCKTON  AVENUE 


CALIFORNIA 


Di  Salvo  Brothers  Duco  Shop 

Automobile  Painting    '    Body  &  Fender  Repair 
Polishing  &  Waxing    •    Auto  Tops 


SAN  JOSE 


Phone  CYpress  5-3453 
500  VINE  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  5-9823 

FRANK  EACHUS.  JR. 

Chevron  Gas  Station 
WILLOW  AND  LINCOLN  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-7909 

PAUL'S  BEAUTY  SALON 

Latest  Permanents    •    Modern  Coiffures 

Hair  Tinting 

1035  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


QUALITY  CAFE 


SAN    JOSE 


Phihp  R.  DeAngelo.  Prop. 

Phone  CY.  3-9909 

49  POST  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


CYpress  4-2984 


Samuel  J.  Batinovich 


SAM'S  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE 

Specializing  in  Hudson  Service  and  Parts 

General  Repairing   ■    Bonded  Used  Car  Dealer 

71   NORTH  FIFTH  STREET 

SAN   J03E  C.ALIFORNI.A 

CY.    4-4383  T.    F.    Orlando 

HYDE   PARK  MARKET 

Quality  Meats 
1098  NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HUEY'S   DIESEL  SERVICE 

Trucks    •    Tractors    •    Cars 

24-Hour  Road  Service 

Phone  CYpress  4-3681 
BAYSHORE   AT  TAYLOR 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ENOS  AUTO  SALES 

Bought    •    Traded    •    Sod 

Dependabe  Used  Cars 

Phones:  CY.  4-6321;  CY.  4-9992 

1135  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNl.A 


ELLA'S  LUCKY  INN 

1148  EAST  WILLIAM 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FLO  AND  GLENN 

Compete  Automotive  Service 

Phone   Ba.  8599 

1800  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  4-1778 

WELDING  SERVICE  CO. 

Machinery  Fabricated  and  Repaired 
BRUNO   DaN'ALLE 
85  TULLY  ROAD 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BARNARD  TRUCK  AND 
TRAILER   MANUFACTURING 

541   SAN  AUGUSTINE 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  5-8941 

ROMANI   BROS. 

General    Building    Contractors 
237  SOUTH  MORRISON  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


4th  place — S.  F.  Revolver  Club 

Team   #1 1115 

5th  place — S.  F.  Police 

Department  1 1 15 

ARE  YOU  THE  MAN— 

Who  folds  the  parking;  tag,  then  de- 
liberately looks  at  his  uatch? 

\\'ho  says:  "No  Parking  Sign — I  did 
not  see  any"  ? 

Who  borrows  his  friend's  car  and 
tears  up  the  tag? 

Who  passed  to  the  left  of  a  standing 
street  car  "so  as  not  to  interfere  with 
the  passengers  getting  on"? 

Who  jay-walked  outside  of  newly 
painted  pedestrian  lanes? 

\\  ho  drives  over  a  safety  zone  "be- 
cause it  was  after  six  o'clock"? 

Who  says:  "Section  58;  there  are  too 
many  sections  to  remember"  ? 

Who  parks  in  front  of  a  garage  en- 
trance "because  the  blinds  were  down 
and  nobody  seemed  to  be  home"  ? 

Who  "did  not  see  the  hydrant  '  until 
he  came  out  of  the  theatre  and  saw  the 
tag  ? 

Who  moved  the  safety  zone  signs 
"only  a  couple  of  feet"  ? 

Who  knocked  the  safety  zone  sign 
down  trying  to  get  ahead  of  others,  and 
said :  "The  other  fellows  crowded  me 
over    r 

^^'ho  says:  "Officer,  thev  must  have 
just  gone  out,"  and  has  no  bulbs  in  the 
flashlights  ? 

^Vho  parked  diagonal  on  Market  Stret 
"because  they  do  it  in  Calistoga"? 

Who  says:  "Officer,  I  did  not  know 
I  was  going  43  miles  because  I  never 
speed" ? 

AVho  shows  his  bent  fender  to  the  man 
whose  car  he  has  wrecked  ? 

Who  is  checked  at  49  and  is  a  friend 
of  the  Judge,  but  "don't  want  him  to 
know  about  this  tag"  ? 

AVho  says  to  the  pedestrian  he  has  just 
knocked  down  :  "Brother,  you'll  find  out 
that  I  am  the  best  friend  \ou  ever  met"? 

Who  says,  on  the  telephone:  "I  am 
too  busy  to  come  to  the  Hall  about  that 
traffic  tag"  ? 

Who  says  to  the  speed  cop:  "You 
should  go  after  the  real  reckless  drivers, 
them  press  cars,  Yellows,  and  butcher 
and  grocery  delivery  jitneys"? 

Who,  waving  his  finger,  in  a  burst  of 
righteous  indignation,  says  to  the  traffic 
officer:  "I  know  Gaffer  and  Ecker — and 
this  won't  do  vou  any  good  "  ? 

WRONG   IDEA 

An  old  idea  that  is  just  as  wrong  as  it 
ever  was  is  reported  by  National  Auto- 
mobile Club  to  drive  at  pressures  lower 
than  those  recommended  for  the  tires  on 
the  theory  that  it  means  better  traction. 


WAYNE'S  ASSOCIATED   SERVICE 


98  NORTH  SECOND  STREET 


SAN    JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  2-5868 

S.  S.  DI   SALVO 

Used  Cars  Bought  and  Sold 
275  EAST  JULIAN  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

EDDIE'S   BAIT  SHOP 

EDDIE  YOSHIDA 

CYpress  3-9070 

631   ROSA  AT  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

WINNER   LADDER  CO. 

C-  E.  Sanders  —  M.  E.  Sanders 

Orchard,  Household,  Exterior  Ladders 

Repairing  All  Makes — Phone  CYpress  4-0426 

1306  SHORTRIDGE  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FAIRBANKS'   BUILDING  SUPPLY 

Phone  CY.  4-4055 
589  WEST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  2-8751  Rose  Galati,  Owner 

QUALITY  KITCHEN 

Specializing  in  Artichoke  Hearts  in  Olive  Oil 
All  Types  of  Peppers 
269  SUNOL  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CL.  8-4977 

J.  W.  "BILL"   ELLSWORTH 

Real  Estate    •    Insurance 

2521   ALUM  ROCK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Philip  E.   Drake,   Prop.  Phone  CY.  2-6114 

DRAKE'S  WRECKING  YARD 

Buyer  of  Old  Cars  and  Junk 

1031    MERIDIAN  ROAD 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DE  LA   ROSA  GROCERY 

CY.  3-9849 
71  WEST  ST.  JOHN 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


T  -  C   PRODUCE  CO. 

CY.  3-9236 
7TH  AND  TAYLOR  STREETS 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CY.  4-2448 

A.  AND   D. 


PRODUCE  CO. 


wholesale  Fruit  and  Produce 
7TH  AND  TAYLOR  STREETS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Bal.  8651 

Patsy  Gallo  Service  Station 

PARK  AND  SPENCER 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  S-9104 

CALIFORNIA  RADIO   SHOP 

Television  -  Radio  Sales  and  Service 
588  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  5-5723 

D.  ERENO 

Furniture  Repairing  and  Refinishing 
730  BIRD  AVENUE 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  28 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


KELLER  &   BICHO 

PRODUCTION   MACHINE  WORK 

Phone    cypress   2-7716 

771    COLEMAN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GRECO  AND   BARCELONA 

TRUCK   and   AUTOMOTIVE   REPAIRS 

CYpress    4-7084 
ISO  NORTH  SAN  PEDRO  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress   4-6244 

GONZALES  ELECTRIC  CO. 

Industrial-Commercial-Residential   Wiring 

Electrical    Service 

1561    SOUTH   FIRST   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Office:    CY.    2-8648  Home:    CY.    S-8476 

JONES  TRANSFER 

Local   and   Long   Distance   Moving 

662    DRAKE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Real   Estate    •    Automobile   Financing 

M.  R.  "JOLLY"  JOLiMAY 

INSURANCE — ALL   FORMS 

Phone   CYpress    4-7354 

1017    BIRD   AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Res.   CYpress    4-5996  Office    CYpress    3-4623 

E.  M.  GODLEY 

Grading  and   Paving  Contractor 

Oil   Macadam  Driveways  My  Specialty 

1290   AUZERAIS   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FRANK  J.  MARINO 

GAS  APPLIANCE  SERVICE 

CY.   4-2054 

586   ALMADEN   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HASKINS  &   DECKER 

INSURANCE 

CYpress    4-0914 

COMMERCIAL   BUILDING 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


HOEFLERS  COFFEE  SHOP 

CYpress    4-2980 
25  NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

KELLEY'S  CASH   GROCERY 
AND   MEAT  MARKET 

BEER  and  WINES    •    LIQUORS 

CYpress    5-8420 

70-72  GEORGE   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

MARY'S   BRITE  SPOT 

Breakfast    •    Lunch    •    Dinner 

Sandwiches    •    Ice  Cream    •    Malts 

Phone  CY.   7-9973 

1139  EAST   SANTA  CLARA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

M.    AkatlfF    Metal    Spinning    Shop 

COPPER  •  BRASS  •  16-GA.  STEEL 

BRONZE  •  ALUMINUM 

Telephone  CLayburn   8-4333 

3671    McKEE    ROAD 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

IN  SAN   JOSE   IT'S 

HAVENLY  FOODS 

Specializing  in   French   Dinners 
On  Bayshore,  Just  North  of   McKee  Road 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GIL'S  AUTO   REPAIR  SERVICE 

All   Makes  of  Autos  and  Trucks  Repaired 

CY.  2-3635 

824  NORTH    13TH   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Garrity   Elected 

(Ciinlinuid  jiom  piuic  S) 

Santa    Clara's    law   enforcement   agency 
tor  35  years. 

O'Neill  won  re-election  by  a  wide 
margin  in  two  subsequent  elections. 

Santa  Clara  Native 

He  is  a  native  of  Santa  Clara,  attend- 
ed University  of  Santa  Clara  College  of 
Business  Administration  and  also  receiv- 
ed training  at  San  Jose  State  College 
Police  School. 

After  his  replacement  by  an  appointed 
acting  chief  last  May,  O'Neill  served  as 
a  probation  officer  with  the  County  Ju- 
venile Authority  for  several  months. 

He  is  now  employed  as  an  investigator 
with  a  San  Jose  law  firm. 

Ex-Constable 

Third  man  in  the  Santa  Clara  police 
chief  race,  Irving  R.  Cabral,  served  two 
years  as  Santa  Clara  constable  until  he 
was  appointed  to  the  sheriff's  office — an 
assignment  brought  about  by  reorganiza- 
tion of  the  lower  court  system  of  the 
state. 

He  was  elected  constable  in  1950.  His 
previous  occupations  included  operation 
of  a  taxi  service  in  Santa  Clara. 

Cabral  also  is  a  nati\e  of  Santa  Clara 
and  a  graduate  of  Santa  Clara  High 
School. 


KEEP  TO  RIGHT 

SACRAMENTO  —  The  California 
Highway  Patrol  has  reminded  slow  driv- 
ers that  despite  the  appearance  of  Euro- 
pean sports  cars  on  the  roads,  the  Ameri- 
can system  of  keeping  to  the  right  is  still 
in  use. 

Patrol  Chief  E.  Raymond  Cato  said 
four  lane  highways  seem  to  have  created 
a  new  type  of  driver  who  knows  which 
two  of  the  four  lanes  is  his,  but  who 
pokes  along  on  the  inside  lane,  posing  a 
hazard  for  the  normal  flow  of  traffic. 

Chief  Cato  pointed  out  that  the  Ve- 
hicle Code  was  specific  in  its  provisions 
on  "keeping  to  the  right." 

He  quoted  the  applicable  section  of 
the  Code  as  stating,  in  part,  "any  vehicle 
proceeding  at  less  than  the  normal  speed 
of  traffic  .  .  .  shall  be  driven  in  the  right 
hand  lane  ...  or  as  close  as  practicable 
to  the  right  hand  edge  or  curb  .  .  ." 

The  Chief  said  these  left  lane  drivers 
force  other  vehicles  to  weave  in  and  out 
in  order  to  maintain  normal  speed.  This 
lane  switching  is  causing  many  mishaps, 
he  said. 

Strange  as  it  seems.  Chief  Cato  added, 
some  motorists  still  drive  on  the  wrong 
side  of  two  lane  roads,  definitely  illegal 
unless  they're  passing  other  vehicles. 


"Let's  Get  Associated" 

PERVAN'S  ASSOCIATED  SERVICE 

Phone  CY.  3-9748 
1940  PARK  AVE.  AT  MAGNOLIA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

INK'S  MARKET 

CY.  3-7539 
1118  MERIDIAN  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Save  -  Way  Plumbing  &   Heating 

C.  M.  PERRY 

Phone  CYpress  2-3259 

1520  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN    JOE  CALIFORNIA 

CRISCIONE  EGG   BISCUIT  CO. 

Italian  Cookies  Made  with  Fresh  Eggs 
1177  EAST  SAN  ANTONIO 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

JOHN'S  GROCERY 

CY.  5-3900 
20O  SOUTH  KING  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S 

CY.  2-1626 
1950  SOUTH  1ST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  5-1825 

JOHN'S  PIZZERIA  AND   BAKERY 

Specializing  in  Italian  Cannoli 
885  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ALAMEDA  KWIK  SERVICE 

CY.  5-7736 
910  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BUSH   TRUCKING 

Local  and  Long  Distance  Hauling 

Phone  CYpress  5-2749 

448  HOBSON   •   810  PERSHING  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  7-0885  Fred  and  Al.  Props. 

Di   PIETRO'S   FISH   &   POULTRY 

Fresh  and  Canned  Fish   •    Dairy  Products    •   Eggs 
349  WILLOW  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

V.  DIMICK'S   RICHFIELD  SERVICE 

Lubrication   and    Tube   Vulcanizing 

Phone  CYpress  4-7824 

360  EAST  WILLIAM  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DAFT'S  SPARTAN   INN 

Meals  and  Fountain  Service 

CYpress  5-3626 

125  SOUTH  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

SAN  JOSE  TILE  CO. 

Sinks,  Store  Fronts    •    Tile  &  Chromium  Fixtures 

Everything  in  Tile    •    Estimates  Furnished 

Telephone  CY.  4-1354 

91    BASSETT  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Associated   Factory    Specified    Lubrication 

DOM   SERVICE 

Phone  CY.  3-9823 
STOCKTON  AND  POLHEMUS 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  20 


DEMARCO'S  DELICATESSEN 

CY.  5-8632 

168  EAST  TAYLOR 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CY    5-9837 

WATSON'S  AUTO  CLINIC 

Texaco  Gas  and  Oil 

Servicing  and  Repairing 

THIRTEENTH  AND  TAYLOR  STREETS 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

AL   DELGADO 

Painting  and  Body  Work    •    Fender  Work 

Electric  and  Acetylene  Welding 

Phone  CY.  5-5401 

600  STOCKTON  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DeMARIA'S  SHOE   SERVICE 

Telephone  CYpress    3-5141 
436  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ROBIN       CAFE 

We  Serve  Meals  at  All  Hours 
Liquors    '    Beer    •    Wine   •    Mixed  Drinks 

1033  NORTH  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  5-4865 

SIMPLEX  MOTOR  PARTS 

734  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Cademartori's   Restaurant  and 
Fountain 

SIL  and   GLORIA 

CYpress   7-2246 

348  PHELAN  AVE.,  between  S.  7th  &  S.  10th 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

SWISS  CAPE 

CY.  5-9971 

284  SAN  AUGUSTINE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

THE  FLYING  CHICKEN 

CYpress  5-2556 

Delivery  in  San  Jose  and  Santa  Clara 

Open  11  A.M.  to  10  P.M. — Closed  Mondays 

929  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  2-8542 

O.  J.  CLEWETT 

Plumbing    •    Heating 

131    BOSTON  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Standard   Produce  Company 
of  Son  Jose 

335  EAST  TAYLOR  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DAHL'S   RICHFIELD   SERVICE 

Tires    •    Batteries    •    Trailers  for  Rent 

CY.  3-9731 

FOURTH  AND  TAYLOR 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DEL'S  UNION   SERVICE 

Washing    •    Waxing    •    Lubrication 

Phone  CY.  3-9571 

1401    ALMADEN  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CONRAD   ROOFING  SERVICE 

Warehouse:  392  Race  Street 

CYpress  4-7615 

890  CINNABAR  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Civic   Unity  in  San  Jose 

( i'ofitntui  J  from  patjt'  '^ ) 
5.  By  acting  in  a  consultant  ca- 
pacity on  policies  suggested  by  the  ad- 
ministration to  determine  whether 
the>'  would  pro\e  beneficial  to  the 
conimunitN'. 

Worthwhile  Programs 
Many  worthwhile  programs  have  been 
instituted  and  have  strongly  stimulated 
interest  in  law  enforcement.  It  is  the 
considered  opinion  of  all  concerned  that 
the  San  Jose  Citizen's  Advisory  Com- 
mittee has  proved  to  be  an  asset  to  all 
departments  of  the  San  Jose  Police. 

J.  R.  Blackmore,  Chief  of  Police  of 
the  San  Jose  Department,  attended  San 
Jose  High  School  in  the  early  twenties, 
and  graduated  and  registered  in  the  first 
recognized  police  school  in  San  Jose.  The 
instructor  of  that  school  is  today  Chief 
of  the  Identification  Bureau  of  the  State 
of  California,  George  Brereton.  Upon 
his  graduation  from  George  Brereton's 
Police  School,  Blackmore  found  himself 
desiring  still  more  education  on  proced- 
ures and  iiuestigation  of  police  work.  He 
was  then  admitted  to  the  Federal  Bureau 
of  Imestigation  Academy  in  Washing- 
ton, D.  C.  He  has  since  returned  twice 
to  the  academy,  once  as  a  guest  speaker 
delivering  a  lecture  on  "Activity  Re- 
porting" and  returning  the  following 
year  in  1949  for  a  retraining  course. 

Athlete 

As  an  athlete  Blackmore  could  per- 
haps have  gained  equal  recognition  with 
his  police  accomplishments.  He  pla\ed 
considerable  semi-professional  baseball, 
"hugging  the  plate"  as  a  catcher. 

During  the  winter  months  when  in- 
door sports  became  popular,  he  excelled 
as  a  handball  pla\er,  gaining  a  popular 
reputation.  Chief  Blackmore  is  modest 
in  his  achievements  by  voice,  but  his 
many  awards  speak  for  themselves.  Tro- 
phy after  trophy  stands  about  the  office 
of  the  department  chief  as  proof  of  his 
versatile  abilities. 

Public  support  and  mutual  under- 
standing of  the  seriousness  of  law  en- 
forcement has  helped  to  coordinate  the 
departments  in  working  together  and 
has  alleviated  many  obstacles  in  future 
law  enforcement. 

APPLY  BRAKES  GENTLY 

Quick,  positive  braking  means  locked 
wheels  and  locked  wheels  slide.  Sudden 
application  of  the  brakes  and  consequent 
sliding  of  tires  is  a  costly  practice  on  a 
dry  road  but.  National  Automobile  Club 
warns,  when  the  roadway  is  wet  and  slip- 
pery it  may  end  in  disaster. 


Phone  CY.  2-5085 

BROWNIE'S  TELEVISION   SERVICE 


SAN    JOSE 


Radio  and  Television 

Service   and    Repair 

482  WILLIS  AVENUE 


CALIFORNIA 


F.  E.  BAKieR  &  SONS.  INC. 

Phone  CYpress  4-5150 

P.  O.  Box  675 

BAYSHORE  AND  GISH  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

COMMERCIAL  TIRE  SERVICE 

Passenger  and  Truck  Wheel  Balancing 

New  and  Used  Tires    •    Recapping  and  Retreading 

CYpress   7-1  174 

1135  AUZERIAS  AVENUE 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

REX  CARD  CLUB 

H.  L.  BOOTH 


CY.  5-9974 
83  POST  STREET 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  3-9743 

EL  CQRT£Z  MOTCR   INN 

Modern  Cottages  and  Trailer  Camp 

with  Radiant  Heated  Shower  Rooms 

On  Monterey  Blvd.   (101  )  2  miles  south  of  city 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  2-3696  Pick-Up  and  Delivery 

DEPE^JDABLE  CLEANERS 

Dry  Cleaning-  and   Laundry  Service 

Hats  Cleaned  and  Blocked    •    Dyeing  of  All  Kinds 

601    NORTH   THIRTEENTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

A.   Pampalone  B.   Amori 

VALLEY  AUTO  WRECKERS 

New  and  Used  Auto  Parts 

Phone  CYpress   5-1272 

1675  SOUTH   FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIAA 

Phone  CYpress  S-9924 

Howard's  Cocktail  &  Liquor  Store 

play  shuffleboard  in  air  conditioned  building 

From  6  A.M.  'til  2  A.M. 

675  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CALIENTE   INN  CAFE 

JACINTO  RODRIGUES 
101  NORTH  SAN  PEDRO  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CY.  2-1812;  CY.  2-0080  A.  C.  "Bud"  Arioto 

Arzino  Fish  and   Poultry  Co. 

Wholesale  and   Retail 

47-49  NORTH  MARKET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  4-8482 

BUCKLES  -  SMITH   CO. 

Wholesalers  of  Electrical  Products 
240  SPENCER  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Office  CYpress  3-6361 

BENSON  WINDOW  SHADE  CO. 

E,  S.  BENSON,  Owner 
310  WEST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress   4-1420  Res.   CYpress   4-0733 

"Al"  Cervelli  Paint  and  Body  Shop 

Service  and   Quality 

All  Work  Guaranteed 

44  VINE  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ADRIAN   PUMP  SERVICE 

Sprinkler  Systems    •    Rain  Control  Irrigation 
Pump  Sales  and  Service 

CYpress  2-2213 

226  PHELAN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


F<ige  30 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Afril.  1953 


SAN  JOSE 


FRED  LUCCHESI 

TEXACO   SERVICE 
898    DELMAS 


CALIFORNIA 


WILLARD   RADIATOR  WORKS 

EXPERT  RADIATOR   REPAIRING 
All   Work   Guaranteed 


SAN    JOSE 


CYpress    5-7587 
60  STOCKTON  AVENUE 


CALIFORNIA 


LIZ'S 

Creamery  and   Restaurant 

711   NORTH  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN  JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Open   Daily   and   Sunday   A.M. 

AUTOMATIC  CAR  WASH   CO. 

Approved    MINIT-MAN    Service 
77   SOUTH  MONTGOMERY   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Wash   and    Polish 


CYpress   5-4184 


LoPresto  Automotive  Service 

Used   Cars    •    General  Auto  Repairs 

396  SOUTH  SECOND 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress   3-7643 

LESTER  E.  GESELL 

Real  Estate    •    All  Forms   of   Insurance 

Income   Tax   Service 

598  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress   3-6613 

OWEN  W.  LEE 

Complete  Brake  Service    •    Motor  Reboring 

Valve   Facing    •    Auto  Repairing 

376  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

REAL  ESTATE  AND  INSURANCE 

E.  J.  WALLACE 

REALTOR 

CYpress    4-1303 

406  W.  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress   4-8373 

HAP  GEORGE  &   BUSH   SERVICE 

Road   Service    •    Service  Station 

Complete   Automotive   Service 

901   EMORY  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ALL  WORK  GUARANTEED 

Charles  G.  Dominick  Duco  Shop 

Body   and   Fender  Repairing 

CY.   5-1984 

272  W.  SAN  FERNANDO  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HARTKE  MOTORS 

Personalized   Used   Cars 

Phone    CYpress    3-5344 

151    ALMADEN    AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    Cypress   2-6125  Wholesale   &   Retail 

ALMADEN  TAMALE   HOUSE 

Makers    of    Best-Buy    Brand 
Tamales   and  Enchiladas 
729   ALMADEN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Towing  &   Repairing    •    Open  Sundays,  Holidays 

BI-WAY  AUTOMOTIVE  CENTER 

Tires,   Batteries,   Accessories,   Gasoline,   Oils 

AXminster  6-3444 

1964    BAYSHORE    HIGHWAY 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

LOU'S  VILLAGE 

Dinners,  Dancing,   Cocktails   and  Catering 

Phone    CYpress    3-4570 

1465  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Traffic  Toll 

(Conlinut'd  from  pat/c  15} 

(*Oiie  death  was  a  pedestrian  and 
train — no  motor  vehicle  involved — but 
is  included  in  this  tabulation.) 

The  average  for  the  smaller  commu- 
nities, the  report  stated,  was  one  death 
or  less,  and  many  towns  had  no  fatali- 
ties for  one  or  both  years. 

And,  while  the  greatest  number  of 
fatal  accidents  occurred  on  the  highways 
outside  of  incorporated  areas,  the  num- 
ber of  accidents  in  urban  areas  is  still 
high  when  compared  to  the  population. 

1  he  report  also  noted  that  in  the  ur- 
ban areas,  from  50  to  75  per  cent  of  all 
traffic  victims  were  pedestrians.  In  some 
small  towns,  the  only  death  recorded  was 
a  pedestrian. 

Furthermore,  Iver  C.  Larson,  execu- 
tive vice-president  of  the  San  Francisco 
Green  Cross,  pointed  out  police  records 
show  that  for  every  fatal  accident  there 
are  approximately  35  persons  injured  and 
225  mishaps  involving  property  damage. 

Larson  also  emphasized  the  dollar  and 
cents  aspect  of  accidents,  as  well  as  the 
needless  suffering  caused  by  death  and 
injury. 

"Statistics  computed  by  the  National 
Safety  Council,"  he  said,  "show  that  the 
average  cost  of  one  fatal  accident  { in- 
cluding wage  loss,  medical  expense,  over- 
head cost  of  insurance  and  property  dam- 
age) is  $21,300;  an  injury  accident  is 
$950  ;  and  one  property  damage  accident 
is  $180. 

"If  people  would  only  remember  that 
most  accidents  need  never  happen  if  a 
little  common  sense  and  caution  is  used 
on  the  highway,  thousands  of  lives  could 
be  saved  each  year  in  the  United  States," 
Larson  said. 

The  safety  leader  urged  everyone  to 
make  1953  the  safest  year  on  the  road 
yet,  and  gave  the  following  advice  for 
both  pedestrians  and  motorists : 

If  you  walk — cross  only  with  the  sig- 
nal and  only  at  proper  intersections.  Look 
carefully  in  both  directions  before  lea\- 
ing  the  curb.  If  you  are  where  there  are 
no  sidewalks,  always  face  on-coming 
traffic.  Wear  or  carry  something  white 
when  walking  at  night. 

If  you  drive — keep  to  a  reasonable 
speed  on  the  highway  and  keep  a  safe  dis- 
tance between  you  and  the  car  head. 
Always  be  alert  for  the  other  fellow  who 
may  not  be  so  careful.  Never  drive  if 
you  have  been  drinking.  Keep  your  car 
in  top  mechanical  condition.  Watch 
carefully  for  pedestrians. 

"Remember,"  he  added,  "you  may 
save  a  life — possibly  your  own." 


Used   Cars — Wholesale  &  Retail 

HALL   MOTOR  COMPANY 

CYpress    7-2234 
1009   SOUTH   FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

LO   SUE'S  MARKET 

Where  Quality   Meets    Prices   from   Farm   to  You 
Phone    CYpress   2-3346 
1481    ALMADEN   ROAD 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GEO.  A.  GILLESPIE  CO. 

Distributor    for   Packard-Bell 

RADIOS    •    TELEVISION    •    PHONOCORDS 

CYpress    2-8685 

996   NORTH  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

PATERSON  OFFICE  SUPPLY 

Printing    •    Office   Machines    •    Office  Equipment 

We   Deliver — CL.   8-4817 

Warehouse:    141    SOUTH   CAPITOL  AVE. 

P.  O.  Box  1281 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

'*The  House   of  Royal  Welcome" 

KING'S  HOiVlE  FURNISHERS 

COMPLETE  INTERIORS 

CL.   8-4713 

2276   ALUM    ROCK   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Best   in    Used   Cars  We    Buy,  Sell,  Consign 

JACK  LUSARDI 

CYpress    4-F599 
9TH  &  SANTA  CLARA  STREETS 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

V.  Lippolis  Drayage  Company 

TRUCKING    •    GENERAL  HAULING 

CYpress    4-1862 

330   KEYES   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Insulation  Asbestos  -   Composition 

A.  M.  LANTZ  ROOFING  CO. 

ROOFING  ALL  TYPES 

Cypress    3-3373 

225  SAN  JOSE  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  5-0827 

SURPLUS  CLEARING  HOUSE 

ROBT.    LA  FOUNTAINE 
544  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HYDE  PARK  CLUB 

WINE    •     BEER   and   EATS 
1041    NORTH  FIRST   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CY.    3-9744 

WILLIAMS  SIGNAL  SERVICE 

Lubrication,   Washing   &   Accessories 

Lock   &   Key   Service 

698  E.  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


VINCE  GROCERY 

CY.   3-9677 
500  NORTH   I7TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

KNUDSON'S  TEXACO  SERVICE 

Phone   CYpress    4-0752 
FOURTH  AND  ST.  JOHN  STREETS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

LOTTIE'S  PLACE 

The  Friendly    Spot 
606  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  31 


FRANK'S   MARKET 

CY.  4-7478 

601    BIRD  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ANDREE'S  DRIVE-  IN 


320  ALMADEN  AVENUE 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


TENTH   STREET  PHARMACY 

Formerly  Juggle's  Drug  Store 

CYpress  4-9131 

COR.  TENTH  AND  SANTA  CLARA  STS. 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  3-9950 

AHREN'S  SERVICE 

Motor  Tune-Up    •    Accessories 

Lubrication    •    Car  Washing 
IITH  AND  SAN  CARLOS  STS. 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Union  Oil  Dealer 


Phone  CY.  5-9875 


A.  L.  ALDRIDGE 

Lubrication    •    Washing    •    Batteries 
4TH  AND  SAN  FERNANDO  STS. 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  CYpress  3-0293 

TRINCHERO   DRIVE-IN 

Automotive  Parts    •    Service 

618  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Anderson   Building  Supply  Co. 

All  Kinds  of  Second  Hand  Lumber 

Plumbing  Fixtures    •    Pipe  Fittings 

Doors    •    Windows    •    Etc. 

521   WEST  JULIAN  STREET — CY.  4-5185 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FRANK'S  COFFEE   SHOP 

Open  All  Night 

57  SOUTH  SECOND  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Income  Homes  Ranches 

RAY  M.  ADAMS  -  Realtor 

Realtor 

Phone  CY.  5-2S13 

45  NORTH  FIRST  STREET.  ROOM  131 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CYpress  4-2012 

Hudson  Mead  Automotive  Service 

General  Repairing    •    Motor  Rebuilding 

Motor  Tune-Up    •    Brake  Service 

661   WILLOW  AT  DELMAS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  2-4612 

J   E  N  O  T  T  •  S 

To  Serve  You  Fine  Pastries 

BARNEY  JENNOTT 

1732  PARK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Free  Estimates  5-Day   Service 

FRALEY'S  CAMERA   REPAIR 

Phone  CYpress  5-0930 
394  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ADA'S  BEAUTY  SALON 

All  Types  of  Beauty  Work 

CYpress  2-7484 

CORNER  14TH  AND  JULIAN 

SAN    JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


BONN   CANDY  CO. 

CY.  4-5878 

287  NORTH  SAN  PEDRO 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Police   Promotional 
Examination   Questions 

III  the  P'ebruary  issue  of  this  journal 
the  toilo«-ins  number  statements,  on  the 
subject  Penal  Code,  were  true:  1,  2,  7, 
9,  10,  16,  18,  19,  20,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25, 
27,  28,  29,  30,  32,  35,  36,  37,  38,  39, 
41,  43. 

1.  A  malicious  intent  is  conclusively 
presumed  from  the  deliberate  commission 
of  an  unlawful  act  for  the  purpose  of 
injuring  another. 

2.  The  testimony  of  an  accomplice 
ought  to  be  \iewed  with  distrust. 

3.  A  witne.ss  false  in  one  part  of  his 
testimony  i.s  to  be  distrusted  in  others. 

4.  An  affidavit  to  be  used  before  a 
court  must  be  sworn  to  before  a  judge 
or  notary. 

5.  "Unwritten"  law  constitutes  a 
part  of  the  law  of  California  and  is  ad- 
ministered in  our  courts. 

6.  Children  must  be  12  years  old  to 
be  competent  witnesses. 

7.  Corroborative  evidence  is  addition- 
al evidence  of  the  same  character  to  the 
same  point. 

8.  One  witness  is  usually  sufficient 
for  the  proof  of  any  fact  except  perjury 
and  treason. 

9.  The  declaration  of  a  dying  person 
made  under  a  sense  of  impending  death 
is  not  admissible  respecting  the  cause  of 
his  death. 

10.  In  a  trial  for  abortion,  the  de- 
fendant cannot  be  convicted  upon  the 
sole  testimony  of  the  woman  on  whom 
the  ofifense  was  committed. 

11.  When  a  signature  is  made  by  a 
mark,  it  must  be  witnessed  by  two  per- 
sons if  it  is  to  serve  as  a  signature  to  a 
sworn  statement. 

12.  The  trial  judge  may  discharge 
one  of  se\eral  defendant,  before  trial, 
that  he  may  be  a  witness. 

13.  A  witness  who  is  about  to  leave 
the  state  may  be  subpoenaed  and  his  tes- 
timony taken  before  a  magistrate. 

14.  A  public  officer  cannot  be  exam- 
ined as  to  communications  made  to  him 
in  official  confidence. 

15.  L^nless  otherwise  expressly  pro- 
vided by  statute,  every  citizen  has  a  right 
to  take  a  copy  of  any  public  writing. 

16.  A  witness  who  is  an  accessory  is 
not  presumed  to  speak  the  truth. 

1  7.  The  judge  himself  may  be  called 
as  a  witness  by  either  party. 

18.  In  the  course  of  a  trial  many 
things  are  taken  as  true  without  proof. 

19.  A  witness  cannot  be  convicted  of 
"false  pretense"  unless  such  pretense  be 
in  writing. 


JACA  GARAGE 

CY.  4-2750 
1008  EAST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

J.  BOTHELIA  JR. 

Gravel  -  Sand  -  Loam  -  Concrete  -  Cement 

House  Moving    •    General  Contracting 

CY.  2-3326 

102  SAN  JOSE  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Leo  Berken's  Automotive  Service 

Pick-Up  and  Delivery  Service 

Phone  CYpress  5-1627 

356  AUZERIAS  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE CALIFORNIA 

MAURO  C.  JIMENEZ 

"Agencia  de  Transacciones" 

Realtor    •    Notary  Public    •    Excliange  Member 

Telephone  CYpress  5-3421 

475  WILLIS  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BLAINE'S  LAMPS  &   SHADES 

Electrifying  and  Repairing  of  Lamps 

Phone  CYpress  5-2340 

1186  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  4-5757 

Johnnie's  Automotive  Service 

Complete  Brake  Service    •    Free  Brake  Inspection 

We  Pick  Up  and  Deliver 

649  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BERGMAN   DAIRY  SUPPLY 

Surge  Service  Dealer 
Telephone  CYpress  2-9788 
912  NORTH  17TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


BILL'S   SPEEDOMETER   SERVICE 

CY.  3-5353 

260  WEST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GAY  LIQUOR 

BILL  WALKER 

CYpress   4-7730 

99  NORTH  SAN  PEDRO  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ADELINE'S  GRILL 

Steaks    •    Chops    •    Chicken 

Phone  CY.  5-9815 
131   WEST  SANTA  CLARA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Stanley  F.  Symes  and  Richard  Donahue 

U- SERVE  STATION 

1949  WEST  JULIAN 
SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GENE'S  MARKET 

CY.  5-9932 
698  NORTH  3RD  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

BINI'S  GRILL 

CY.  4-7481 
337  EAST  TAYLOR 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


LEO'S  GROCERY 

CY.  5-9692 
602  NORTH  13TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Page  32 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


Fine  Fine  Cars  —  New  and  Used 

TED   HAYS  MOTOR 

Licensed  and  Bonded  Dealer 

CYpress   7-2010 
701  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  3-6388 

KAGEL'S  of  Wi//ow  G/en 

S.   R.    KAGEL.  Owner 

Home  Furnishers  and  Decorators 

1180  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Slop — Let  Us  Reline  Your  Brakes 

KARNES  AUTO  REPAIR 


SAN  JOSE 


Phone  CY.  4-2974 
545  KEYES  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


LES  JOSEPH'S  GARAGE 

GENERAL  AUTO  REPAIRING 

CYpress   4-1101 
18  SOUTH  EIGHTH  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Chevron  Gas  Station 

ART  MASHBURN 

BASCOM  &   HEATHERDALE 

Phone  AX.  6-9835 

PICK  UP  AND  DELIVERY  SERVICE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


HOSLEY'S  MARKET 

Phone  AX.  6-4286 
1999  PARK  AVENUE 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  CY.  2-0578 

HYDE  PARK  AUTO  SALES 

Fod  Good  Used  Cars 
1101   NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

GARDEN  CITY  PET  SHOP 

33  E.  SAN  ANTONIO — CYpress  4-1787 

or 

945  LENZEN  AVE. — CYpress  3-1163 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

YOU  ARE  WHAT  YOU  EAT 

HEIDE'S,  Natural  Food  Center 

"1001    HEALTHFUL  FOODS" 

CYpress  2-7292 

63  NORTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DON'S  MARKET 

Phone  CY.  4-8630 
151   ALMA 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Chas.  W.  Jones  Texaco  Service 

Phone  AX.  6-6686 
2106  THE   ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Hiebert  Desk  and  Show  Case  Co. 

Executive  Office  Furniture   •    Store,  Bank  & 

Office  Fixtures    •   Custom  Cabinet  Work 

CYpress  7-0237 

1581    ALMADEN 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Ultra  Modern 


Hotel  Service 


BELL    MOTEL 

Close  to  Stores,  Shows  and  Cafes 
Telephone   AX.    6-8608 
2165  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


DORLEE'S  RESTAURANT 


SAN  JOSE 


Phone  CY.  5-9668 
42  FOUNTAIN 


CALIFORNIA 


20.  If  a  defendant  in  a  criminal  ac- 
tion offers  himself  as  a  witness,  he  may 
be  cross  examined  as  to  all  matters  hav- 
ing any  bearing  on  his  trial. 

21.  The  clerk  of  the  court  must  issue 
without  charge  as  many  subpoenas  as  the 
defendant  may  require. 

22.  A  subpoena  is  served  by  deliver- 
ing the  original  to  the  witness  personally. 

23.  Only  a  police  officer  may  serve  a 
subpoena  in  the  county  in  which  it  is 
issued. 

24.  Only  a  magistrate  or  clerk  of  the 
court  can  issue  a  subpoena. 

25.  The  law  does  not  permit  conclu- 
sive evidence  to  be  contradicted. 

26.  The  testimony  of  one  reliable 
witness  is  sufficient  for  the  proof  of  the 
commission  of  a  misdemeanor. 

27.  Perjury  can  be  proved  only  by 
the  direct  testimony  of  two  or  more  wit- 
nesses. 

28.  If  a  juror  becomes  a  witness,  a 
new  jury  must  be  drawn. 

29.  Oral  evidence  of  the  contents  of 
an  affidavit  is  as  good  evidence  as  the 
affidavit  itself. 

30.  Cumulative  evidence  is  additional 
evidence  of  a  different  character. 

31.  All  the  rules  of  evidence  in  civil 
actions  apply  to  criminal  actions. 

32.  Upon  a  trial  for  murder  the  law 
requires  a  degree  of  proof  that  produces 
absolute  certainty. 

53.  The  record  of  a  court  of  compe- 
tent jurisdiction  cannot  be  contradicted 
by  the  parties  to  it. 

34.  A  witness  must  answer  as  to  the 
fact  of  his  previous  conviction  for  felony. 

35.  Any  person  who  willfully  pre- 
vents a  person  who  is  subpoenaed  as  a 
witness  in  a  criminal  trial  from  attending 
the  trial,  is  guilty  of  a  misdemeanor. 

36.  An  offer  to  compromise  is  a  direct 
admission  that  something  is  due. 

37.  Any  writing  may  be  proved  only 
by  persons  who  saw  the  writing  executed. 

38.  The  direct  evidence  of  one  wit- 
ness who  is  entitled  to  full  credit  is  suf- 
ficient for  proof  of  any  fact. 

39.  In  a  criminal  case  the  people  may 
cause  the  testimony  of  a  witness  who  is 
about  to  leave  to  be  taken  by  deposition, 
and  said  deposition  may  be  used  at  the 
trial. 

40.  Oral  evidence  of  the  contents  of 
an  instrument  is  secondary  evidence  of 
the  instrument  and  contents. 

41.  An  attorney  cannot,  without  the 
consent  of  his  client,  be  examined  as  to 
any  communication  made  by  the  client  to 
him. 

42.  When  an  instrument  consists 
partly  of  written  words  and  partly  of  a 
printed  form,  and  the  two  are  inconsis- 
tent, the  former  controls  the  latter. 


Phone  CY.  5-9868  9  A.M.  to  2  A.M.  Daily 

JIMMIE  MILLS 

Now  Operating  BART'S  PLACE 

Liquors    •    Wines    •    Beer   •    Mixed  Drinks 

1872  W.  SAN  CARLOS  (Corner  Irving) 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

JULES  BOZZI   -  Jeweler 

JEWELRY  GIFTS  FOR  EVERY  OCCASION 
"It's  Jules  for  Jewels" 

23  EAST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


FIRST  CALIFORNIA  COMPANY 

BANK  OF  AMERICA  BUILDING 
CYpress  4-6684 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


SAN  JOSE 


RAY  BRADY 

Brokers  in  Real  Estate 

1457  PARK  AVENUE 

CY.  7-0470 


CALIFORNIA 


PAINTING    •    TOWING 

GEORGE'S  BODY  SHOP 

Wrecks  Rebuilt    •    24-Hour  Towing  Service 

CLayburn  8-2896 

1714  ALUM  ROCK  AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Rates  Reasonable  CY.  4-8200;  CY.  3-9650 

BERGER   HOTELS 

KATHERINE  F.  BERGER,  Proprietor 

38  N.  SECOND  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CYpress  7-1700 

JERRY  DAVIS  TRAVEL  SERVICE 

Air    •    Steamer    •    Cruises    •    Rail 

Member  American  Society  of  Travel  Agents 

74  W.  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

C.  J.    (CHET)    BRISCOE 

REAL  ESTATE  BROKERS 

Notary 

Res:  CL.  8-3730;  Office:  CL.  8-3696 

4142  ALUM  ROCK  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

STARR   RADIO  &  TELEVISION 

JOSEPH  GLORIA.  Owner 

Sales  and  Repairs 

Phone  CY.  4-3493 
240  WEST  SAN  CARLOS 


I 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Homes  Construction 

Real  Estate    *    Insurance 

MARS  REALTY  CO. 

163  WILLOW  STREET 
CYpress  7-0722 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


AVILA'S  MARKET 

1604  HAMILTON 
Phone  CY.  2-1767 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HANFORD  ELDH 

DISTRIBUTOR  OF  SENSATION  MOWER 

Sales  and  Service    •    Garden  Equipment 

CYpress   5-8687 

490  EMORY  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

CLAYBOURN'S  BAKERY 

Decorated  Cakes  for  All  Occasions 
Full  Line  of  Bakery  Goods 

CYpress  4-2914 
2210  LINCOLN  AVENUE 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

THE      CIRCUS 

Magazines    •    Tobaccos    •    Games 
4TH  AND  SANTA  CLARA  STS. 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Apnl,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  33 


CY.    5-9854 


SAN    JOSE 


HALEY'S 

The  Best  of  Wet  Goods 
79  POST  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


CYpress    2-7346  CYpress    2-3184 

GLEASON  TIRE  SERVICE 

SS  TULLY  ROAD 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


DERYL  M.  JONES 

MOBIL   SERVICE   STATION 

CY.   5-9825 

FIRST  and   UNION  STREETS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

MARTY'S   PLACE 

Mixed   Drinks    •  Best   of  Meals 

Tel.   CY.  3-0676 

852   PARK  AVENUE 
SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


CYpress   3-7663  Room   Radios 

ACONDA  HOTEL 

New    Matching   Furniture 

WARD   8<    BETH    JOHNSON,    ManaKing   Owners 

141    WEST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Walt  Netton  CYpress  3-7572 

WALT'S  SERVICE 

General   Auto   Repairing 
Service   Station    •    Lubrication 
24TH  and  JULIAN   STREETS 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

OMOBONO  GRIJALVA  &  SON 

GENERAL   LABOR   CONTRACTORS 
Telephone    CYpress   4-3460 
440  NORTH  17TH  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Bus.    CYpress    7-1449 


Res.    CYpress    2-3760 


NICK  SUTO   RADIO 

Auto   Radio   Sales   and   Service 
296  WEST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

HORTON'S  CERAMIC  STUDIO 

Ceramics    •    Porcelain    "    Firing    •    Instructions 

CYpress    5-1258 

1592   MERIDIAN  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

LAUNDROMAT 

Automatic    Half   Hour   Self   Service   Laundry 
CY.  2-0800 — FR.   8-4081 
NO.   7   BOSTON   AVENUE 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Archie's  Maintenance  Service 

Complete  House  Cleaning    •    Windows  Cleaned 

*         Floors  Cleaned,  Waxed,  Polished,  Sanded 

Phone  CY.  5-7181   for  Free  Etsimate 

746  RACE  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Sam   Alaimo  Art  Nieri 

San  Jose  Cleaners  and  Dyers 

CYpress  4-5834 
507  WEST  SAN  CARLOS  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Cypress  3-1963  Open  7  a.m.  to  8  p.m. 

ALONGI'S  AUTO  SERVICE 

Motor  Tune-Up    •    Brakes    •    Carburetion 

Signal   Oil  Products 

1343  THE  ALAMEDA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ARNONE'S  MARKET 

CY.  2-6268 
830  MALONE  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


4.^.  In  some  instances  the  jury  can 
take  both  the  law  and  the  tact  under  con- 
sideration, in  making  a  decision. 

44.  A  witness  about  to  lea\e  the  state 
may  be  subpoenaed  and  his  evidence 
taken  before  a  magistrate. 

45.  The  testimony  of  an  accomphce 
ought  to  be  viewed  with  distrust. 

46.  No  woman  can  be  required  to  tes- 
tify against  her  husband  in  a  trial  for  a 
crime  he  has  committed  against  her. 

SAFETY  CONTEST 

A  nationwide  safety  contest  for  police 
departments  has  been  announced  by 
Chief  C>rille  Leblanc,  Gardner,  Mass., 
president  of  the  International  Associa- 
tion of  Chiefs  of  Police,  and  Franklin  \l. 
Kreml,  director  of  the  lACP  Traffic  Di- 
vision and  vice  president  for  traffic  and 
transportation  of  the  National  Safetv 
Council. 

The  contest,  sponsored  by  the  Interna- 
tional Association  of  Chiefs  of  Police, 
will  be  conducted  by  the  National  Safety 
Council.  Divisions  will  be  provided  for 
municipal  police  departments  and  state 
police  and  highway  patrol  organizations. 

Police  fleets  will  complete  in  accord- 
ance with  the  rules  of  the  National  Fleet 
Safety  Contest,  which  is  now  in  its  22nd 
year  and  includes  more  than  1,300  truck, 
bus,  and  taxicab  fleets.  Winners  in  each 
of  the  police  divisions  will  receive  the 
National  Fleet  Safety  Contest  plaque 
bearing  the  names  of  both  sponsoring  or- 
ganizations. 

Contestants  will  compete  without 
charge  and,  under  the  rules,  will  report 
the  number  of  reportable  accidents  sus- 
tained and  vehicle  miles  traveled  during 
each  month.  Each  contestant  will  receive 
a  monthh'  bulletin  showing  his  cumula- 
tive accident  frequency  and  his  standing 
in  the  contest.  Police  departments  will 
be  mentioned  in  the  bulletin  by  code 
number  only. 

Mr.  Kreml  described  the  contest  as  a 
proven  tool  of  accident  prevention  and 
an  important  new  service  to  police  ad- 
ministrators who  are  interested  in  cutting 
down  accidents  involving  police  equip- 
ment. 

The  contest  will  begin  July  1,  1953, 
and  will  close  June  30,  1954.  Police 
administrators  may  obtain  contest  rules, 
registration  forms,  and  report  forms  by 
writing  the  Motor  Transportation  Di- 
vision, National  Safety  Council,  425  N. 
Michigan  A\e.,  Chicago  11,  111. 

TAKE  CORNERS  SLOWLY 

Corners  should  be  taken  slowly,  states 
National  Automobile  Club,  for  squeegee- 
ing around  corners  at  high  speeds  scrapes 
miles  off  the  tires. 


BERNICE'S  CLEANERS 

Alterations    •    Tailoring    •    Refitting 

Highest  Quality  Cleaning 

Phone  CYpress  4-1987 

134  EAST  SAN  SALVADOR  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


RITA'S  DELICATESSEN 

CY.  4-3716 

163  WEST  ALMA 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

DISPOSAL  SERVICE   INC. 

Phone  CY.  5-2090 
821  NORTH  23RD  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ROLAND   HAMPTON 

PLUMBER 

Phone  AX.  6-4878 

402  SOUTH  HENRY 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


CY.  2-1542 

CANCILLA  MOTORS 

Motorcycle  Parts  and  Accessories 

Ariel    "  Mustang    •    Triumph 

776  NORTH  THIRTEENTH  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Homecraft  Construction  Co. 

Real  Estate  and   Insurance 
Builders  of  Fine  Homes 


SAN   JOSE 


CYpress   7-1220 
881    PARK  AVENUE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  CYpress  4-2449 

W.  A.  CALL  MFG.  CO. 

Furnace  Pipe  and   Fittings 
430  WILLOW   STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

L.  E.  GARCIA 

DEPENDABLE 

Electric  Sewer  and  Drain  Cleaning  Service 

Plumbing    *     Heating 

330  EAST  WILLIAM — CY.  2-4922 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


CYpress    3-1460 


Established    1924 


JO.  DORSA'S  SMOKE  SHOP 

Cigars    •    Pipes    •    Tobaccos 

Billfolds    "    Candies    •    Fountain   Lunch 

62  WEST  SANTA  CLARA  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Office  Phone  CYpress  2-9244 

ARDIZZONE  TRAILER 


PARK 


Modern  and  Clean  Rest  Rooms 

Located  in  the  Heart  of  Town 

275  BALBACH  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

ALEXANDER'S 

Tailors  and  Cleaners    *    Alterations 

J.  URIBE 

CYpress  5-9219 

38  NORTH  MARKET  STREET 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ANGELO'S   PAINTING  CO. 

CY.  4-8875 
346  DELMAS 


SAN   JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


SAN  JOSE 


COMPLIMENTS  OF 

JACK   P.  SILVA 

830  PEDRO 


CALIFORNIA 


ALBANESE  SIGNS 

Cut  Out  Letters    •    Walls    •    Trucks 

Bulletins    •    Sho  Cards    •   Neon  Repaints 

Phone  CYpress   5-7560 

310  EMORY  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


Page  34 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


.'ipril.  1953 


FROSTY    VILLAGE    DONUT    SHOP 

3407  STEVENS  CREEK  ROAD 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

EDRIS  TRUCK  STOP  RESTAURANT 


1005  NORTH  13TH  STREET 


SAN  JOSE 


CALIFORNIA 


Golden   State  Termite  Control 

Licensed  Inspectors 

San  Jose  Office — AX.  6-7039 

Palo  Alto   Office — DAvenport  2-2412 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Pac.  Coast  Fixtures  &  Refrigerators 

Drug  Store,  Office,  Market,  Bar,  Restaurant 

Clothing  Store  Fixtures 

O.  DONATELLI — Phone  CY.  3-5909 

2860  MONTEREY  ROAD 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CY.  2-1087 

HAMILTON   SERVICE 

Batteries    "    New  and  Used  Tires 
JESSE  and   IRENE  SPARKS.  Props. 
831   SAN  JOSE-LOS  GATOS  ROAD 

CAMPBELL  CALIFORNIA 

DURA  LITE  LADDER  CO. 

All-Weather  Orchard  Ladder,  Oil  Treated 

Mechanic  or  Household  Ladder 

Wholesale  or  Retail 

1710  GRANT  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   CYpress   4-619S 

HANDLY  MACHINE  REPAIR  CO. 

Master   Precision    Scraping 
1860  SOUTH  FIRST  STREET 

SAN  JOSE  CALIFORNIA 

FANELLI'S  PHARMACY 

Prescriptions    •    Drugs 

Phone  CY.  3-8044 

COR.  13TH  AND  TAYLOR 

SAN   JOSE  CALIFORNIA 


ANDERSON'S  PEST  CONTROL 

Service  That  Satisfies 
PALO  ALTO  SAN  JOSE  SAN  MATEO 

Phone  AXminster  6-3075 

California  Monumental  Company 

MEMORIALS 

LINCOLN  AND  BELLOMY  STS. 

Opposite  Cemetery 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

DODGE  &  ARONSON 

FOOD  PROCESSING  EQUIPMENT 

Canning    •    Freezing    "    Drying 

AXminster  6-2828 

215  MONROE 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


San  Jose  Creamery  and  Cafe 

Phone  AX.   6-1688 

2939  PARK  AVENUE 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  AXminster  6-6396 

JOHN   F.  SILVA 

CEMENT  CONTRACTOR 

Subdivisions    •    Foundations    •    Floors 

1687  WASHINGTON  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


GOLDSMITH   SEASIDE  SERVICE 

Phone  AX.  6-9970 
3790  EL  CAMINO  REAL 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


SCHOOL     FOR     EXAMINERS 

"Selection  and  Training  of  Driver 
License  Examiners,"  a  three-week  pro- 
fessional, in-service  training  course  for 
driver  license  administrators  from  states 
throughout  the  country,  will  be  offered 
in  Evanston,  111.,  from  May  11  to  29 
by  the  American  Association  of  Motor 
Vehicle  Administrators,  according  to  L. 
S.  Harris,  executive  director  of  the  or- 
ganization. 

Fhe  course — L'nit  'J  hrec  in  a  four- 
unit  training  program  for  chief  driver 
license  examiners  which  began  in  1951  — 
will  be  conducted  by  the  Traffic  Institute 
of  Northwestern  LIniversity. 

Twenty-five  $100  tuition  scholarships 
have  been  made  available  for  this  course 
by  the  Farmers  Insurance  Group  Safety 
Foundation  of  Los  Angeles.  Scholarship 
award  winners  will  be  selected  from  ap- 
plicants by  a  selection  board  composed 
of  representatives  of  the  AAMVA,  the 
Farmers  Insurance  Group,  and  North- 
western University. 

"The  course  in  selection  and  training 
of  driver  license  examiners,"  Mr.  Harris 
said,  "will  help  the  super\ising  examiner 
to  do  a  better  and  more  effective  job  as 
a  supervisor  and  as  an  instructor  in  the 
very  important  work  of  driver  examin- 
ing." 

The  course  is  under  the  direction  of 
Glenn  V.  Carmichael,  member  of  the 
training  stafT  of  the  Traffic  Institute  and 
one  of  the  country's  foremost  authorities 
on  driver  license  examiner  training.  He 
will  be  assisted  by  Paul  C.  Keller  of  the 
Institute  staff  who  was  formerly  driver 
licensing  specialist  of  the  Utah  State  De- 
partment of  Public  Safety. 

"Driver  license  examining  is  poten- 
tially one  of  the  most  effective  forces  for 
reducing  traffic  accidents,"  Mr.  Car- 
michael said.  "Most  accidents,"  he  stat- 
ed, "are  caused  not  by  deficiencies  in 
the  roads  or  the  cars  but  in  the  drivers 
themselves." 

The  course  is  the  third  of  four  annual 
courses  conducted  for  chief  examiners  by 
the  Traffic  Institute  for  the  American 
Association  of  Motor  Vehicle  Adminis- 
trators.   The  first  unit,  held  in   March, 

1951,  was  on  "Standards  for  Driver  Ex- 
aminations. "     The    second,    in    March, 

1952,  was  "Administration  of  Driver 
License  Examinations."  The  fourth  unit, 
to  be  held  in  1954,  will  be  on  "Reports, 
Records,  and  Analysis." 

The  training  program  for  chief  exam- 
iners has  been  split  into  four,  three-week 
units  because  the  men  can  rarely  be 
spared  from  their  jobs  longer,  Mr.  Car- 
michael said. 

The  course  is  open  ot  any  director  of 
driver  licensing,  supervising  examiner,  or 


H.   RAMONDT  &  CO. 

Ceramics    and    Porcelain    Painting 

Instruction    •     Supplies     •    Greenware  and   Firing 

Phone  AXminster  6-1738 

855  MATHEW  AVENUE 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    AX.   6-9829 

ELDEN'S  TEXACO  SERVICE 

Lubrication    •    Tires  and  Batteries 
4590  EL  CAMINO  REAL  AND  HAM  AVE. 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

RAYNOR   PARK  FOOD  CENTER 

Phone  AX.  6-8887 

4798  EL  CAMINO  REAL 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Duke's  Service  Station   No.  1 

FRANK  DUTRA,  JR. 

1810  EL  CAMINO  REAL 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

"LET'S  GET  ASSOCIATED" 

CAMARDA  BROS. 

Phone  AXminster  6-9958 
1700  EL  CAMINO  AT  PIERCE  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


VI  D  AL'S 


Mixed  Drinks    •    Home  Made  Tamales 
and  Enchiladas  Served  or  Take  Home 

1700  EL  CAMINO  REAL 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

AZEVEDO'S  MARKET 

Phone  AX.  6-4143 
1095  CLAY  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

JULIE   BALDASSINI  AL   BALDASSINI 

JULIE'S  COFFEE  SHOP 

AXminster   6-3539 
945  MAIN  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

SANTA  CLARA  DRUG  CO. 

PRESCRIPTION  DRUGGISTS 

AXminster  6-4727 

COR.  MAIN  &  FRANKLIN 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

MYERS  CERAMIC  PRODUCTS  CO. 

SANTA  CLARA  TILE 

LES.  HINZ 

Phone  AXminster  6-3492 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

GENOVA  DELICATESSEN 

JOE  BRUNA 

Ravioli    •    Fresh  Salads    •    Olives    •    Pickles 

Phone  AX.  6-9953 

970  FRANKLIN  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

CANGiAMILLA  FRUIT  CO. 

FRUITS  AND  VEGETABLES 

Phone  S.  C.  704-J 

1195  SHERMAN  STREET — COR.  FREMONT 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

AX.  6-9852 

DEE'S  BAYSHORE  CAFE 

Food  Like  Mother  Tried  to  Cook  and  Couldn't 

BAYSHORE   HIGHWAY 

(At  Santa  Clara-Alviso  Road) 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Bus.  AX.  6-2166  Res.  CY.  4-0997 

ROGERS 

COMPLETE  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE 

Motor,  Brake,  Chassis,  Tune  &  Carhuretor 

1481   MAIN  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


k 


Ai>ril.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  35 


Mike    Vierra 


Jerome    (Jerry)    Fiirtado 


M.  &  J.  Shell  Service  Station 

Pick   Up  and   Delivery  Service 

AXminster  6-9965 
CLAY  AND  MAIN  STREETS 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  AXmin.iter  6-0818 

NETO  SAUSAGE  CO. 

Manufacturers    of 

Linguica    •    Choiirico    •    Morcellas 

740  HARRISON  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  AX.  6-9947 

BERMUDES  CAFE 

TONV  and  CECELIA.   Proprietors 

Fine  Foods    •    Beer  and  Wine 

500  GRANT  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

San  Jose  Awning  &  Tent  Company 

I.  S.  ERBENTRAUT 

AXminster  6-9286 

2245  THE  ALAMEDA 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

PAM  DOTY 


COAST  MOULDING  CO. 

FENCES  —  REDWOOD 

AXminster  6-4336 
1710  GRANT  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

CLYDE    CABRAL 

General  Building  Contractor 
Free  Estimates 

AXminster  6-1159 
1899  BELLOMY  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

Red    &   White   Food   Stores 

KIELY'S   MARKET 

The  Very  Best  in  Quality 
Groceries    •    Meats    •    Fruits    "    Vegetables 

790  LINCOLN  STREET 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 

CROSSETT  ENGINEERING 
&  MFG.  COMPANY 

p.  O.  BOX  268 
SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


GoFORTH  &  McGah,  Inc. 

Builders  of 
Distinctive  Homes 

p.  O.  BOX  2 10- A 

Phone  AXminster  6-6653 

SANTA  CLARA,  CALIFORNIA 


other  person  connccred  with  exaniiniiifi 
ciri\-crs  or  with  dri\  cr  improvement  work, 
who  has  department  approval. 

Major  subjects  to  be  covered  are: 
Tlie  Selection  Process:  Introduction 
to  the  theories  and  concepts  of  personnel 
selection.  Importance  ot  selecting  the 
right  man  for  the  job  of  driver  examin- 
ing. Elements  of  an  effective  recruiting 
program.  The  role  of  the  application  in 
the  selection  process.  Qualifications  of 
examiners.  How  to  make  a  job  anahsis. 
Personnel  tests.  Techniques  and  guides 
in  conducting  interviews.  The  selection 
process  in  promotion  of  examiners. 

A  Training  Program  :  ^Vhat  effective 
training  will  accomplish.  Duties  of  the 
Administrator  and  Instructor  in  initiat- 
ing, planning,  administering  and  operat- 
ing a  training  program.  Training  for 
siiper\ision.  Organization — what  conies 
first. 

How  to  teach:  Qualifications,  knowl- 
edge and  special  abilities  necessary  to 
train  others.  The  instructor  as  an  aii- 
visor,  energizer,  coordinator,  and  plan- 
ner. Factors  that  condition  learning. 
The  teaching  process.  Lesson  outlines. 
Training  aids.  Techniques  and  guides 
for  improving  presentation  as  an  instruc- 
tor. Demonstrations,  role  playing  and 
problem  solving.  Test  and  quizzes  as 
aids  in  the  teaching  process.  How  to  de- 
\ise  tests.    Rating  the  student. 

Demonstration  and  Practice:  Actual 
practice  by  the  students  and  participation 
in  personnel  selection  tests  and  inter- 
views. Preparation  of  job  analysis.  De- 
vising a  recruiting  program  for  exam- 
iners. Practice  in  devising  and  using 
training  aids. 

Further  information  on  the  course  may 
be  obtained  by  writing:  AAMVA  Chief 
Examiner  Training  Program,  c/o  Traf- 
fic Institute,  1704  Judson  Avenue, 
Evanston,  111. 


CLEAN  THE  CLEANERS 

Car  owners  have  a  way  of  forgetting 
that  cleaners  have  their  limitations;  that 
they  will  pick  up  just  so  much  dirt,  de- 
clares National  Automobile  Club.  At 
least  once  a  year,  the  cleaners  should  be 
cleaned,  or,  in  the  case  of  the  non- 
cleanable  types,  filtering  elements  should 
be  replaced. 

ALLOW  SAFE   FACTOR 

Drixing  the  highway  with  one  car 
length  between  your  car  and  the  car 
ahead  for  every  ten  miles  of  speed,  is  said 
b\-  National  Automobile  Club  to  be  an 
important  safety  factor.  This  allows  for 
stopping  or  maneuvering  should  an  emer- 
gency arise. 


WM.  M.  HENDERSON  JR. 

GENERAL  CONTRACTOR 

Res.  Ph.  AXminster  6-3122 

Office  AXminster  6-6998 

4311  EL  CAMINO  REAL 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


DAY  &  YOUNG 

BUTTERSWEET  PRODUCTS 


P.  O.  BOX  27 


SANTA  CLARA 


CALIFORNIA 


FIELDS  ELECTRIC  WORKS 

Electrical   Fixtures    •    Appliances 

Refrigerators   and   Radios    •    Admiral   Television 

House  Wiring    •    Motors  Rewound  and  Repaired 

Electrical  Repairs  of  All   Kinds 

M.  G.  FIELDS 

AXminster  6-0161    or  AXminster  6-0162 
2261    THE  ALAMEDA 

SANTA  CLARA  CALIFORNIA 


PAUL  QUINTERNO 

SHELL 

Gas    •    Oils    "    Accessories 

Expert  Greasing    •    Tires  Repaired 

STEVENS  CREEK  ROAD 

MONTE   VISTA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  AXminster  6-5463 

TROPIQUARIUM 

TROPICAL  FISH    •   GOLD  FISH 
AQUATIC  PLANTS  and  SUPPLIES 

M.  'l'.  HASHIMOTO 

12115  SO.  SARATOGA-SUNNYVALE  ROAD 
(So.  Highway  9  Near  Prospect  Road) 

CUPERTINO  CALIFORNIA 

BLUE  HILLS  REAL  ESTATE 

Homes    •    Ranches    "    Acreage 
Fine  Los  Altos  and  Saratoga  Properties 

DAN  and  MARION  NUTTLINGER 

AXminster  6-1426 

Residence  WHitecliff  8-5838 

SOUTH  SARATOGA-SUNNYVALE  ROAD 

Box  301 

CUPERTINO  CALIFORNIA 


Glaser  Engineering  Co. 

Registered  Professional  Engineers 

INDUSTRIAL  ENGINEERING 

PROCESS  &  TOOL  ENGINEERING 

MECHANICAL  DRAFTING 

MACHINE  DESIGN 

CHerry  3-1363 

BAY  AREA  OFFICE 

1965  Lafayette  Street 
Santa  Clara,  Calif. 


Page  36 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


When  low  in  spirits  call .  .  . 

Vic's  Liquor  Store 

Joe  Meli.o,  Jr. 
Manager 

Free  Delivery 
Open  Evenings  and  Sundays 

MAIN  and  CLAY  STREETS 

SANTA  CLARA 

AX.  6-6622 


ROSE  BROTHERS' 

Market  and  Variety  Store 

FULL  LINE  MERCHANDISE 

ONE-STOP  SHOPPING 

We  Reserve  the  Right  to  Limit 
Quantity 

Just  West  of  Truckee 
TRUCKEE,  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  163W 
Headquarters  for  Good  Eating 

GOODFELLOW'S 
COFFEE  SHOP 

Reg  Smart,  Manager 
TRUCKEE,  CALIFORNIA 


TONINI'S 

OVALITY  GROCERY 
Fresh  Meats 


TRUCKEE,  CALIFORNIA 


Wolf  Hunt  in   Los  Angeles 

(Ciirilinii.J  from  page  5) 

name  of  being  a  section  of  town  where 
no  unescorted  woman  could  walk  a  block 
without  risking  insult,  abuse  of  assault 
by  an  obscene  wolf. 

Her  partner,  Marie  Little,  a  beauti- 
ful, blue  eyed  blonde,  shared  her  role. 
While  Florence  walked  in  one  direction, 
awaiting  the  assault  which  they  said 
would  be  inevitable,  Marie  walked  in 
another. 

The  trap  was  carefully  planned  and 
well  set  up.  Early  in  the  day  Florence 
and  Marie  had  been  called  into  the  of- 
fice of  Captain  Ben  Stein,  commanding 
officer  of  the  Los  Angeles  Juvenile  Bu- 
reau and  ordered  to  report  to  the  77th 
Street  station  that  night.  The  work  was 
not  in  the  general  line  of  duty  for  the 
girls. 

Ordinarily  they  rode  a  patrol  car  in 
downtown  Los  Angeles,  checking  bus 
stations  and  train  stations  for  runaw-ay 
juveniles,  inspecting  all  night  theaters 
for  curfew  breaking  youngsters  and  se- 
curing accommodations  for  stranded 
women.  Sometimes  the)-  in\estigated 
crimes  involving  children.  But  serving 
as  bait  to  trap  a  molester  was  a  little 
out  of  their  line. 

Lieutenant  Paul  Phelps  briefed  them 
when  they  reported  to  the  77th  Street 
station  that  night.  He  explained  that 
Chief  of  Detectives  Thad  Brown  had  or- 
dered a  concentrated  effort  to  capture 
the  men  who  had  been  making  San  Pedro 
Street  unsafe  for  women  and  told  them 
how  they  were  going  to  do  it.  The  plan 
was  foolproof  and  safe.  As  safe  as  any 
such  plan  can  be. 

7  he  young  women  had  plenty  of  as- 
sistance. A  total  of  thirty-five  detectives 
and  plainclothes  men  were  assigned  to 
unmarked  automobiles  and  placed  in  po- 
sitions throughout  the  area  which  would 
enable  at  least  two  of  them  to  keep  their 
eyes  on  Policewomen  Coberly  and  Little 
at  all  times.  An  area  bounded  on  the 
east  by  San  Pedro,  the  west  by  Broad- 
way, the  South  by  Eighty-third  and  the 
north  by  Sixty-fifth  streets  was  pictured 
on  a  specially  prepared  map  with  the 
routes  to  be  followed  by  the  girls  and  the 
stations  of  the  watching  officers  carefully 
indicated. 

Both  girls  were  cautioned  to  be  selec- 
tive about  the  type  of  arrest  they  made. 
The  wolf  on  the  street  corner  who  whis- 
tles at  anything  in  skirts  was  not  their 
quarry.  Lieutenant  Phelps  warned  them 
that  they  wanted  the  thugs  who  had  been 
snatching  purses  and  dragging  women 
down  alleys.  He  also  informed  them  that 
they    would    never    be    out    of    sight    of 


DONNER  TRAIL  LUMBER  CO. 


Everything   to   Build   Anything 


Phone  71-Y-ll 
P.  O.  BOX   145 


TRUCKEE 


CALIFORNIA 


TRUCKEE -TAHOE  LUMBER 
COMPANY 

incorporated 

Lumber,  Hardware,  Housewares,  Plumbing 
Supplies  and  All   Other  Building  Materials 

Telephone:  Truckee  126;  Tahoe  City  99 

TRUCKEE  &  TAHOE  CITY      CALIFORNIA 


THE  CENTER  OF  VACATION  LAND 

TOURISTS  LIQUOR  STORE 

Beer    •    Liquors    •    Wines 
Magazines    •    Tobaccos    •   Candy 


TRUCKEE 


Phone   96 


CALIFORNIA 


THORNTON'S  GARAGE 

General   Automotive  Service 
Towing 


TRUCKEE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone:  Truckee  349 

DONNER  LAKE 
LODGE 

open  Year  'Round 

Water  Skiing 

Fishing 

Swimming 

EUROPEAN   PLAN 

20  Motel  Units 

Dining  Room  and 
Cocktail  Lounge 

P.  O.  Box  57 
Truckee,  California 


J 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  37 


Phone  2275 

Relax  on  Top 
of  the  World 

Roomy  Dormitor}- 
Accommodations 

DONNER  SKI 
RANCH 

ON  DONNER  SUMMIT 
Complete  Ski  Shop  Inside 

Cafeteria  -  Cocktails 

Beginners  Hill  Revamped 

ARO  SKI  SCHOOL 

Many  New  Ski  Trails 

Soda  Springs  P.  O. 
California 


Phone  Cisco  Grove  2 

CISCO  GROVE 
LODGE 

Adolph  Gull  -  Percy  M.  English 

HEATED  CABINS    -    COFFEE 
SHOP   -   COCKTAIL   LOUNGE 

P.  O.   BOX  717 
SODA  SPRINGS,  CALIF. 

Phone:  Cisco  Grove  1 

CISCO  GROVE 
RESORT 

Bert  and  Dot  Bacon 

Service  Station   -  Groceries 
Cabins   -   Toboggan  Hill 

P.  O.  Box  717 
SODA  SPRINGS,  CALIF. 


other  officers  so  there  was  h'ttle  to  worry 
about. 

Florence  Coberly  told  herself  there 
was  little  to  worry  about  under  any  cir- 
cumstances. Before  joining  the  Los  An- 
geles Police  Department  she  had  been 
employed  as  a  model  and  as  a  gymna- 
sium instructor  and  was  convinced  that 
she  could  defend  herself  against  any  kind 
of  attack. 

The  policewoman  had  walked  less 
than  two  blocks  when  the  young  man 
approached  her.  He  was  powerful,  tall, 
dark  and  broadshoiildered  wearing  a 
colorful  sport  shirt  and  brown  slacks. 

"Let's  go  have  a  little  fun.  Babe,"  he 
suggested. 

He  stood  squarely  in  front  of  her, 
blocking  further  progress,  a  lecherous 
leer  in  his  dark  brown  eyes,  his  lips 
twitching  just  a  little. 

Policewoman  Coberly  speeded  her  pace 
and  brushed  past  him.  "Not  tonight, 
junior,"  she  replied  coldly.  She  contin- 
ued walking  south  toward  Eighty-third 
Street  where  she  knew  officers  were  wait- 
ing, staring  straight  ahead,  not  knowing 
what  the  young  man  behind  her  was 
doing. 

A  wolf?  Yes,  he  was  a  wolf  all  right, 
but  so  far  the  ordinary  type  of  masher. 
He  had  done  nothing  to  prove  that  he 
was  the  man  the  police  were  seeking. 
Mrs.  Coberly  quickened  her  pace,  won- 
dering with  just  a  twinge  of  fear  if  this 
was  the  moment  she  was  waiting  for. 
Nothing  happened. 

Another  block,  two  blocks  and  still  no 
incident.  Almost  a  half  hour  later  she 
had  covered  thirteen  blocks  without  in- 
terruption. Her  feet  were  aching  a  little. 
The  darkness  was  complete.  Sometimes 
she  could  not  help  glancing  up  and  down 
the  street,  trying  to  spot  the  department 
cars  which  were  assigned  to  guard  her. 
They  were  unmarked.  One  car  looked 
just  like  another.  The  featureless  sil- 
houettes in  the  parked  cars  could  be 
officers  ...  or  they  could  be  men  she 
was  trying  to  trap. 

Eight\'-second  Street.  A  tan  Oldsmo- 
bile  sedan  was  double  parked  in  the 
street,  its  engine  running,  a  boy  or  a 
young  man  sitting  behind  the  steering 
wheel.  Policewoman  Coberly  glanced  at 
it  briefly,  then  directed  her  gaze  on  up 
the  street.  The  young  fellow  was  wait- 
ing for  someone,  probably.  There  was 
nothing  to  worry  about.  She  moved 
abreast  of  it,  then  past.  Just  a  few  steps 
beyond  it  when  the  figure  appeared  in  the 
darkness,  striding  into  view  from  a  door- 
way. A  tall  man,  broadshouldered  and 
dark.  Even  in  that  dim  light,  Mrs.  Cob- 
erly was  able  to  identify  the  lecherous 
features  of  the  man   who  had   accosted 


Telephone:  Soda  Springs  2282 

SKI  THE  SUGAR 
BOWL 

California's  Traditional  Favorite 

New  Double  Chair  Lift 

Wide  Variety  of  Ski 
Terrain 

BILL  KLEIN  SKI 
SCHOOL 

Advauta^eous  Mid-Week 
Special 

Norden,  California 


SKI  AT  SODA 


DOUBLE  CHAIR 
LIFT 

For  Your  Winter 

Sports  Learn  to  Ski 

THE  Relaxed  Way 


Buck  Ski  School 

Soda  Springs 

California 


Page  38 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


.^pnl,  1953 


BEACON   HILL  LODGE 

In  the  Heart  o\  the   Sierra   Playground 

ELMO   B.   MOKIANO.   Managing  Owner 

All   Year  Recreation   Center 

Skiing    '    Swimming    *    Sports 

Telephone   Soda    Springs   2611 
ON    HIGHWAY    40    NEAR    DONNER    SUMMIT 


VANDERFORD  LODGE 

MRS.  J.  A.  VANDERFORD.  Owner 

Rooms    •    Bar    •    Coffee  Shop 
Open   Year  Around 

TOP  OF  DONNER  SUMMIT 

P.  O.  BOX  98 

Phone   Donner  Summit   #1 

NORDEN   STORE  AND  SERVICE 
STATION 

O.  &  L.  FREDERICK 
Groceries    •    Meats    •    Vegetables 
Serving   the  Donner  Summit   Area 

Phone    Norden    1 


NORDEN 


CALIFORNIA 


HELLER'S  VARIETY 

GIFTS   &  NOVELTIES 
"Best    for   Less" 


TRUCKEE 


CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  2301 

DONNER  SUMMIT 
LODGE  AND  HOTEL 

FOR  WINTER  FUN 
AND  SUMMER  SUN 

Col.  William  (Bill)  Rutherford 
Managing  Director 

HIGHWAY  40 
SODA  SPRINGS,  CALIFORNIA 


GRIFF  LOU  LODGE 

"GOOD  FOOD" 

COCKTAILS 

Auto  Service  -  Repairs  -  Towing 

Housekeeping  Cabins  and  Rooms 

Hunting  -  Skiing  -   Fishing 

3  Miles  West  of  Soda  Springs  on 

U.  S.  Highway  40 

Telephone  Kingvale  Park  1 

P.  O.  Box  92 
NORDEN,  CALIFORNIA 


her  thirteen  blocks  back  up  the  street. 
J'his  was  her  man  then.  He  must  be 
the  riijht  one. 

"Look."  1  he  obscene  gesture  was  >in- 
mistakable. 

Policewoman  Coberly  hesitated,  then 
opened  her  mouth  to  speak.  The  words 
were  never  uttered.  Without  warning 
she  found  herself  in  the  grip  of  the  mo- 
lester, who  half  lifted  and  half  dragged 
her  into  the  shadows  of  the  recessed 
doorway.  He  held  the  policewoman  with 
his  left  hand  while  pressing  something 
hard  against  her  chest. 

Mrs.  Coberly  looked  down  and  caught 
a  glimpse  of  what  appeared  to  be  a  nickel 
plated  automatic  pistol  in  the  atacker's 
grip.  When  she  saw  it  her  confidence  in 
her  ability  to  defend  herself  vanished 
abruptly.  It  was  replaced  by  paralyzing 
fear. 

The  idea  occurred  to  her  that  she 
might  be  the  first  murder  victim  of  this 
man  who  had  forced  his  attentions  on  at 
least  a  dozen  women  in  the  district.  She 
saw  herself  shot  and  left  to  die  in  the 
deserted  doorway,  and  wondered  at  the 
same  time  where  the  officers  who  were 
supposed  to  be  watching  over  her  were. 
According  to  all  plans  they  should  have 
seen  him  drag  her  from  the  sidewalk. 

"Keep  quiet,"  he  warned.  "I  just  want 
to  kiss  you." 

\Vith  the  menacing  little  piece  of 
metal  still  pressed  hard  against  her,  Flor- 
ence Coberly  submitted  to  the  caress.  She 
had  little  choice.  The  molester  held  her 
tight  against  him,  pinioning  her  arms  to 
her  sides  in  a  manner  which  gave  her  no 
opportunity  to  remove  her  gim  from  its 
holster  and  bring  it  into  firing  position. 
'1  he  gun,  she  knew,  was  a  menace  to 
her  own  safety.  If  the  man  became  aware 
of  it  he  might  guess  she  was  a  police- 
woman and  kill  her  instantly.  She 
squirmed  and  twisted  in  his  grip. 

"Don't  move,"  he  warned.  "I  want 
to  kiss  you  again." 

That  was  once  too  often.  Police- 
woman Coberly's  temper  got  the  best  of 
her  discretion.  One  frantic  effort  brought 
her  hands  up  to  his  chest  and  she  pushed 
him  away.  The  action  infuriated  the 
molester.  He  dropped  the  little  weapon 
into  his  pocket  and  snatched  the  young 
woman's  purse,  tearing  it  from  her  shoul- 
der and  hurling  it  to  the  pavement.  Next 
he  raised  his  arm  in  a  threatening  ges- 
ture. 

"Don't  hit  me,"  she  begged.  "I'll  go 
■with  you." 

Mrs.  Coberly  knew  she  had  to  get  out 
of  that  doorway  into  the  dimly  lighted 
street  where  the  officers,  who  she  was 
SLire  must  have  missed  the  first  act,  would 
ha\e  a  chance  to  see  her. 


Telephone    Big    Bend    3 
Hotel  Accommodations 


Glenn    Parsons 
Velda  Parsons 


TRAILSYDE  LODGE 

SODA  SPRINGS  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Soda  Springs  2262 

SODA  SPRINGS  SERVICE 

CHEVRON  SUPREME  GASOLINE 

Tires    •    Battery  and  Lube  Service 

Steam  Cleaning    •    Towing 

RALPH   ROWTON 

SODA  SPRINGS  CALIFORNIA 

PITTA  AND  ARAUJO.  Owners 

KALICO  KAT 

Open  8  A.M.   to  2  A.M. 

Mixed   Drinks    •     Television 

Shuffleboard 

8701   EAST  14TH  STREET 

OAKAND  CALIFORNIA 

Used   Cars  to  Fit  Your  Purse 

H.  &  J.  AUTO  SALES 

Phones  LO.  8-S49S  and  LO.  8-2652 
7520  AND  8239  EAST  14TH  STREET 
OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  TRinidad  2-1075 

LOCKWOOD  CLEANERS 

We  Operate  Our  Own  Plant 
SPECIAL  1-DAY  SERVICE 

62ND  AVE.  AND  EAST  14TH  ST. 
OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

WE  OPERATE  OUR  OWN  PLANT 

SOUTHERN   DRY  CLEANERS 

8  Hours  Service  if  Desired 

2830  SEMINARY  AVENUE 
8209   E.   14TH  STREET — LOckhaven  8-2065 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


M.  &  L.  ROOFING  CO. 

Phones: 
Business— TRinidad  2-4500 

Residence— SW  8-1621 

SIDING     :-:    ROOFING 

ROOFING  OF  ALL  KINDS 

By  Roofers  Who  Know  How 

All  Work  Guaranteed 

Established  1920 

LocKYER  Bros. 

1361   -  92nd  Avenue 

OAKLAND  3,  CALIFORNIA 


i 

J 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  39 


MEL  AND  TED  SERVrCE  STATION 

Dealer  Shell   Petroleum    Products 

Service  Is  My   Business 

Telephone  KE.  3-4550 

CORNER  FOOTHILL  AND  FRUITVALE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  OLympic   2-2383 

ROY  GOVAN  COMPANY 

Leather  and  Craft  Supplies 
3908  GROVE  STREET 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


ROCKRIDGE  WICKER  WORKS 

Phone  OLympic   3-1850 

5332  COLLEGE  AVENUE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


Maria  Prentice 


W.  J.  Prentice 


LOCKWOOD   FLORAL  SHOP 

Weddings    •    Corsages    •    Funeral  Designs 
6732  EAST  14TH  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

H.  C.  James.  Owner 

James  Clock  Manufacturing  Co. 

Manufacturer  of  "James  Remind-O-Clock" 
5307  EAST  14TH  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


Support  Your 
AMERICAN   RED  CROSS 


K  A  S  P  E  R  '  S 

ROSE  KOOJOOLIAN 

We  Specialize  in  Hot  Dogs 

Catering  to  Lodges  and   Parties 

3252  FRUITVALE  AVENUE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

LEAVITT'S   MEAT  MARKET 

Finest   Quality 
Meats,  Fish  and  Poultry 

3005  MacARTHUR   BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


OLD   HOMESTEAD 

Since  1880 

1243  13TH  AVENUE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

JOYCE'S 

T.  JOYCE.  Prop. 

Beer   •    Wine    •    Liquors 

1200  13TH  AVENUE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

HARVEY  RABBIT  CO. 

Get  the  Habit  and  Eat  More  Rabbit 
10401   PEARMAIN  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

CASTELLO  GROCERY 

Choice  Wines  and  Beer 

Groceries    •    Fruits   and  Vegetables 

Piedmont  5-2233 

4738  WEST  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

LUCCA   DELICATESSEN 

Salami    •    Ravioli    •    Tagliarini 

FACTORY 

Telephone  TRinidad  2-6311 

9637  EAST  14TH  STREET 


OAKLAND 


CALIFORNIA 


Ralph   Bishop 

FOOTHILL 


GARAGE 


One  Stop  Service    •  Auto  Repairs    •    Painting 

Fender  and  Body  Work 

5521    FOOTHILL  BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


"You'll  come  all  right,"  he  declared, 
picking  her  up  bodily  and  striding  to- 
ward the  Oldsmobile  which  was  still 
double  parked  a  short  distance  away. 
After  proceeding  a  short  distance  he  de- 
posited her  on  the  sidewalk. 

"Now  come  on,  "  he  urged. 

The  policewoman  jerked  a  whistle 
from  the  right  hand  breast  pocket  of  her 
jacket. 

"What  have  \ou  got  there?"  the  hood- 
lum demanded. 

Florence  forced  a  smile.  "Wait  a  min- 
ute and  I'll  show  you." 

It  happened  too  fast  for  him  to  stop 
her.  Before  he  could  move  Mrs.  Coberh 
had  blown  one  shrill  blast  on  her  police 
whistle.  A  stiff  right  cross  knocked  her 
dov\n  before  she  could  go  any  farther 
than  that. 

Blind  rage  and  primitive  passion 
seemed  to  merge  in  the  molester  then. 
AVhile  he  beat  the  inert  policewoman 
with  one  hand  he  fumbled  with  her  skirt 
with  the  other.  Mrs.  Coberly  remem- 
bered a  bit  of  advice  she  had  received 
from  her  husband  regarding  her  course 
of  action  in  case  she  was  ever  knocked 
down. 

"Play  possum,"  he  had  said.  "Just 
make  believe  you  have  been  knocked  out. 
It  will  serve  as  a  delaying  action." 

Eyes  closed,  Florence  Coberly  lay  still, 
praying  and  waiting.  Seconds  later  the 
sounds  of  running  feet  and  her  attack- 
er's curse  told  her  help  had  arrived. 

For  a  moment  everything  seemed  to 
happen  at  once.  The  husky  young  man 
forgot  the  girl  and  fled.  Policewoman 
Coberly  climbed  to  her  feet  just  in  time 
to  see  Officer  Frank  A.  Marz  dash  by 
shouting  "Police  officer.  Halt  or  I'll 
shoot." 

The  fugitive  ran  past  the  Oldsmobile, 
shouted  something  to  the  driver,  then 
ran  around  the  corner.  Marz  followed, 
close  on  his  heels.  Meanwhile  the  Olds- 
mobile leaped  forward  and  plunged  at 
top  speed  down  the  street.  Mrs.  Coberly 
had  time  to  draw  her  revolver  and  fire 
one  shot  at  the  fleeing  car.  Then  it  was 
gone. 

In  the  distance  she  could  hear  the 
sound  of  other  shots.  Two  in  quick  suc- 
cession, an  interval,  then  two  more.  Mrs. 
Coberly  jammed  the  police  whistle  into 
her  mouth  and  blew  it  frantically,  trying 
to  attract  the  attention  of  other  officers. 
Marie  Little,  her  partner,  came  run- 
ning toward  her.  Together  they  dashed 
around  the  corner  where  they  saw  Marz 
and  Officer  W.  \1.  Clago  standing  over 
the  man  who  had  recently  attacked  Mrs. 
Coberly.  The  molester  was  alive,  but 
breathing  heavily  and  obviously  badly 
hurt. 


OWL  BAIT  SHOP 

H.  M.  DENNIS  &   SONS,  Props. 
Fresh  Bait    •    Worms    •    Tackle 

8870  MacARTHUR  BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 


MARY  EXLEY 

FRUITVALE  NURSING  HOME 

3124  FRUITVALE  AVENUE 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Piedmont  5-1497 

WILLIAM   H.  STREHLE  CO. 

Autonnotive  Painting:  and  Lettering  Service 
to  the  Discriminating 

494  THIRTY-SIXTH  STREET 

OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

H.  F.  WALKER 

SEA  FOOD   APPETIZERS 

751    105TH  AVENUE 
OAKLAND  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   3-9732 

TOM  CHAPELEA'S  NAVAL 
BASE  CAFE 

147  GEORGIA  STREET 

VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

W.   V.   McKnight 

12  6      CLUB 

VALLEJO'S  SOPHISTICATED 
SEPIA   NIGHT  CLUB 

Dancing    •    Entertainment 
Phone   3-9915 

126  GEORGIA  STREET 

VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

EAT  HERE  AND  DIET  HOME 

MAC'S  SILVER   DOLLAR  CLUB 

DAN    &    IRENE    McCINNIS 
BEER 

Phone  3-9400 
663  BENICIA  ROAD 

VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  3-5233 

JOHN'S   DRIVE -INN   MARKET 

Groceries    •    Fruits    •    Meats 

DELICATESSEN 

Beer   •    Wine    •    Toys    •   Notions 

303  SPRINGS  ROAD  AT  AMADOR 
VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 


Page  40 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


You  Name  It...  We  Mix  It 


SOLANO  INN 


Where  Good  Fellows 
Get  Together 


233  Georgia  Street 
Vallejo,  California 


MAID  OF 

CALIFORNIA 

MILK  CO. 


AWARDED  18  GOLD 
MEDALS 


For  Purity  and  Quality 

* 

627  Maryland  Street 
Vallejo,  California 

.■..--....-4 


"Call  the  radio  cars  and  an  ambu- 
lance," Marz  instructed. 

'1  he  two  women  ran  to  a  nearby  serv- 
ice station,  but  it  was  closed.  They  asked 
for  a  telephone  at  the  first  tavern  they 
passed,  but  were  told  it  was  out  of  order. 
Finally  they  found  a  police  car  manned 
by  Officers  A.  C.  Challoner  and  J.  P. 
Donnelly.  While  they  were  telling  their 
story  an  ambulance  siren  was  heard  wail- 
ing in  the  distance. 

"Somebody  call  the  ambulance,"  one 
of  the  officers  declared.   "Get  in." 

"Someone  was  with  him,"  Mrs.  Cob- 
erly  reported.  "A  young  fellow  in  a  tan 
Oldsmobile.    About  a  47  or  48  model." 

"Did  you  get  the  license  number?" 

"I'm  afraid  not.  It  was  too  dark  to 
see  it." 

Donnelly  drove  to  the  scene  of  the 
shooting  where  Lieutenant  Phelps  and 
several  of  his  men  had  gathered,  depos- 
ited the  two  policewomen  there  and 
promptly  drove  ofif  in  search  of  the  tan 
Oldsmobile. 

One  of  the  men  from  the  ambulance 
knelt  over  the  prostrate  form  of  the 
molester.  He  felt  his  pulse,  then  looked 
up  at  Lieutenant  Phelps. 

"You  need  the  coroner,"  he  an- 
nounced. "It's  too  late  for  us.  The  man 
is  dead." 

Mrs.  Coberly  inquired  about  the  nick- 
el plated  automatic  and  the  attendant 
searched  the  dead  man's  pockets.  He 
produced  a  nickel  plated,  pistol  type, 
cigarette  lighter. 

"Do  you  mean  this?"  he  inquired. 

Florence  Coberly  blushed.  "It  looked 
like  a  gun  to  me,"  she  declared. 

"No  one  could  blame  you,"  Lieuten- 
ant Phelps  told  her.  "In  your  spot  it 
would  have  looked  like  a  gun  to  any- 
one. 

A  visit  to  the  Georgia  Street  Receiv- 
ing Hospital  ended  Mrs.  Coberly's  ad- 
ventures for  the  evening.  Later  that 
night  Officers  Challoner  and  Donnelly 
located  the  tan  Oldsmobile  and  appre- 
hended the  driver — a  teen-aged  boy  who 
said  he  had  just  "gone  along  for  the 
ride." 

1  he  dead  man,  who  had  a  long  arrest 
record,  was  identified  by  several  women 
as  the  man  who  had  snatched  their  purses 
or  molested  them. 

Mrs.  Coberly  has  been  awarded  sev- 
eral citations  and  named  woman  of  the 
year  in  Los  Angeles  as  the  result  of  her 
courage  and  clear  thinking  in  handling 
the  assignment. 

Excerpt   from   a   Los  Angeles   Police 

Department  memo,  continued :  ".  .  .  was 

attacked  by   an   exconvict  who  accosted 

her  on  the  street  and  pulled  her  into  a 

darkened  doorway.    She  was  threatened 


NBC  AUTOMOTIVE  SERVICE 

•■BILL"  SCOBLE 
639  HYDE  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Hank's  Jewelry  and  Watch  Repair 

All  Works  Guaranteed 
1712  POLK  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

CONTEMPORARY  USEFUL  GIFTS 

Stainless  steel  flatware    •    china  and  glass 

Open  evenings  until  8,  Sundays  12  to  5 

NANNY'S  DESIGN  GALLERY 

203S  FILLMORE  STREET— Fillmore  6-233S 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

S.  &  W.  MACHINERY  & 
SUPPLY  CO. 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


PIER  3 


CALIFORNIA 


MR.  SIDNEY  MIRON 

17S0  GEARY  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DR.  ROBERT  H.  JACKSON 

Optometrist 

329  TENNESSEE  STREET 

VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

VICTORY  CORNER 

Fine  Liquors    •    Italian  Food 

101   VIRGINIA  STREET 
VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

WEBNER  AND  BYERRUM 

BLACKSMITH  SHOP 

Ornamental  Iron  Work    •    Step  Railings 
Electric  and  Aceteline  Welding 

20S  BROADWAY — Ph.  3-6359 

VALLEJO  CALIFORNIA 

Chas.  A,   McDaniel 

MAC'S  AUTO  TOP  SHOP 

Skilled  Trimmers  and  Upholsterers 
Auto  Tops  Repaired  and  Recovered 

Phone  3-4187 
129   BROADWAY 


VALLEJO 


CALIFORNIA 


You  Are  Always  Among  Friends 
at  the 

KEG     INN 

Cocktails  and  Mixed  Drinks 

245  Georgia  Street 
VALLEJO,  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  41 


WESTERN   TRUCK  LINES.  LTD. 

75  COLUMBIA  SQUARE 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

UNIVERSITY   RESTAURANT 

2078  HAYES  STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

L.  &  H.  PAINT  PRODUCTS 

ISO  MISSISSIPPI   STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

JOHN  J.  NATHAN   &   SON 

General   Insurance  Brokers 

1597  SIXTEENTH  AVENUE 
SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

WAGGONER'S  GUEST  HOUSE 

3100  WASHINGTON  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MYRON'S  JEWELRY 

90S  STOCKTON  STREET 


SAN    FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


TRAVEL  TOURS 

PERSONALIZED   TRAVEL  SERVICE 

Scheduled   Air    Lines,   Foreign   Travel 

Telephone   UNderhill    1-1420 

1231    MARKET  STREET— WHITCOMB  HOTEL 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MICHAELS  TAVERN 

TUxedo   5-1277 
62  TAYLOR  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

MIZ  BROWN'S   RESTAURANT 

2414  LOMBARD   STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

YOUNG  CHINA  NEWSPAPER 

881   CLAY  STREET 
SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC  PUMP  &  SUPPLY  CO. 

Distributors  Myers  Ejecto  Pumps  and 
Water  Systems    "    Star  Windmills 

420  BRYANT  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Washington  Studio  Apartments 

WE.    1-9677 


SAN 

2277   WASHINGTON  STREET 
FRANCISCO                                    CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

MRS.  VESA  WESTERMANN 

1192  PAGE  STREET 
SAN  FRANCISCO                                   CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

REV. 

80  SANTA 

SAN  FRANCISCO 

D.  ZUNIO 

ROSA  AVENUE 

CALIFORNIA 

ivitb  uhat  appeared  to  be  a  .25  caliber 
aiitoinalie  and  after  a  brief  scuffle  ivas 
successful  in  freeing  herself,  at  which 
time  she  blew  her  police  ichistle  for  as- 
sistance. 

"After  blou'iny  the  ivhistle  she  icas 
i/iimediately  struck  on  the  jait.'  and 
knocked  to  the  ground  by  the  molester, 
during  uhich  time  he  attempted  to  tear 
her  clothing.  Tuo  deteetii'es  immedi- 
ately responded  to  Policeiioman  Cober- 
ly's  signal  and  upon  seeing  the  detectives 
the  molester  attempted  to  flee  from  the 
scene. 

"The  detectives  and  Policewoman 
Coberly  fired  several  shots  at  the  moles- 
ter which  later  proved  fatal. 

"Subsequent  investigation  disclosed 
that  the  molester,  an  exconvict,  had  a 
record  of  some  40  arrests,  which  include 
a  prison  term  for  burglary,  as  welt  as  a 
previous  record  of  molesting  iromen  and 
children." 


TRAFFIC  CIRCUS 

(Continued  from  page  i) 
Thousands  of  parents  and  school  offi- 
cials have  praised  the  show's  effective 
method  of  teaching  safety.  The  follow- 
ing remark,  by  J.  Harold  Klopp,  Prin- 
cipal of  Amanda  E.  Stout  School  in 
Reading,  Pa.,  is  typical. 

"I  am  sure  our  pupils  will  be  more 
conscious  than  ever  in  observing  safety 
habits  and  rules  in  their  daily  lives  as 
the  result  of  your  program." 

Safety  Club 

In  conjunction  with  his  traveling  show, 
Pressley  has  organized  a  Junior  Traffic 
Safety  Club,  which  now  has  a  member- 
ship of  over  700,000.  School  children 
become  eligible  for  membership  in  the 
dub  after  correctly  answering  series  of 
questions  on  traffic  safety.  The  question- 
naires are  passed  out  by  Pressley  imme- 
diately after  his  show. 

A  certificate  of  membership,  picturing 
Officer  Pressley  and  four  of  his  perform- 
ing dogs,  is  sent  to  each  member  of  the 
club  by  the  American  Trucking  Asso- 
ciations. 

The  Traffic  Safety  Circus  is  endorsed 
by  the  National  Safety  Council,  the  In- 
ternational Chiefs  of  Police  Association, 
J.  Edgar  Hoover  of  the  FBI,  and  edu- 
cators and  civic  organizations  through- 
out the  countrv. 


Tread  lightlv,  mv  friend  ;  this  spirit  has 

fled. 
On  earth  he  was  Hiram  Begum, 
He  sat  at  the  wheel 
Of  his  automobile 
After  downing  a  gallon  of  rum. 


JAMES  HURST  CO. 

155  MONTGOMERY  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


FRASER  &  JOHNSTON 
COMPANY 


1900  -  I7TH  STREET 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


NASSAU  CHEMICALS.  INC. 


420  MARKET  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


HERMANN  SAFE  COMPANY 


HOWARD   AND  MAIN  STREETS 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


V.    G  UZ 

(Formerly   L.   Kling) 

AUTO   PAINTING 
First    Class    Lacquer 

730  ELLIS   STREET 

Upstairs 

SAN   FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


UNIVERSAL  SUPPLY  CORP. 

82S  FOLSOM  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


WRESCO  WHOLESALE 
RADIO  &  SUPPLY  CO. 

Distributors 

ill  Northern  California  for 

Stewart  Warner  Radio  and 

Television 

RCA  Tubes  -  Parts  -  Test 

Equipment  -  Batteries 

140  Ninth  Street 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 


Page  42 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April.  195- 


COMFORT 

Mile  After  Mile  on 
the  ROUTE  OF  THE 

Orient-Star^ 

One  trip  with  PAL  and  you'll  never 
forget  the  friendly,  personalized 
service  that  makes  you  feel  like  an 
honored  guest. 

go  PAL 

and  discover  real  luxury  in  Air 
Travel. 

PHiuppm  Am  lims 

SPANNING  3/4   OF  THE  WORLD 

PAL  Office:  Do.  2-1688 

2  1 2  Stockton  Street 

San  Francisco 


LYNCH  CARRIER 
SYSTEMS,  INC. 

96  JESSIE  STREET 

San  Francisco 
California 


PACIFIC  GEAR  & 
TOOL  WORKS 


1035  Folsom  Street 

San  Francisco 


TRAFFIC  SEMINAR 

Men  and  women  working  in  jobs  de- 
voted in  part  or  in  full  to  the  task  of 
reducing  traffic  accidents  and  congestion 
will  be  able  to  choose  from  all  specialized 
short  courses  and  seminars  in  nine  traffic 
fields  to  be  offered  during  the  Summer 
Institute  for  TrafSc  Training  at  North- 
western University. 

Franklin  M.  Kreml,  director  of  the 
Traffic  Institute  of  Northwestern  Uni- 
versity, has  announced  that  the  annual 
Summer  Institute  will  be  held  this  year 
during  the  period  June  22  to  August  21. 

One-week  courses  will  be  offered  in 
Motor  Vehicle  Fleet  Supervision,  Chem- 
ical Tests  to  Determine  Intoxication, 
Traffic  Engineering  Field  Study  Meth- 
ods, Traffic  Engineering  Techniques  of 
Regulation,  Public  Information  Pro- 
grams for  Police,  Accident  Records,  and 
Training  for  Police  Instructors. 

The  two-week  course  in  Supervisory 
Officer  Training,  a  two-week  Seminar  for 
Driver  Education  Teachers,  and  a  two- 
day  Refresher  Seminar  in  Motor  Fleet 
Supervision  also  will  be  offered. 

The  Medill  School  of  Journalism 
again  will  cooperate  with  the  Traffic 
Institute  in  conducting  a  three-day  Traf- 
fic Safety  Seminar  for  Newspapermen 
on  July  8-9-10. 

Descriptions  of  the  courses  follow: 

Motor  f'ehiclc  Fleet  Supervision — 
June  22-26.  For  fleet  owners,  operators, 
supervisors,  safety  engineers,  training  or 
personnel  directors,  and  others  connected 
with  fleet  safety.  Stresses  making  the 
fleet  safety  program  more  effective ;  get- 
ting good  drivers ;  keeping  records  to  im- 
prove efficiency  and  reduce  accidents ; 
more  effective  training  of  drivers. 
Course  coordinators  are  Francis  P.  Low- 
rey  of  the  Traffic  Institute  and  Paul  H. 
Coburn  of  the  National  Safetv  Council. 
Fee  is  $40. 

Refresher  Seminar  in  Motor  Fleet 
Supervision — June  25-26.  For  persons 
listed  above  who,  by  experience  or  train- 
ing, already  have  an  understanding  of  the 
basic  problems  of  fleet  safety  and  super- 
vision. Specific  problems  and  solutions 
will  be  developed.  The  seminar  will  be 
led  by  Prof.  Ajnos  E.  Neyhart,  Institute 
of  Public  Safety,  Pennsylvania  State  Col- 
lege.   Fee  is  $20. 

Chemical  Tests  for  Intoxication — 
June  22-21 .  For  technicians  and  other 
persons  from  police,  health  and  medical 
departments  who  may  be  called  upon  to 
determine  degree  of  intoxication.  To  be 
conducted  by  Dr.  Clarence  W.  Muehl- 
berger,  toxicologist  for  the  state  of  Mich- 
igan, and  Lt.  Robert  F.  Borkenstein, 
chief  technician  of  the  Indiana  State  Po- 
lice.  Fee  is  $40. 


Ladies:  Mon.,  Tues.,  Wed.,  Thurs. 
Men:  Fri.,  Sat.  and  Sun. 

• 

CASTRO  ROCK 

STEAM  BATHS 

• 

Hygiene  Beneficial 

for  Health 

• 

Open  Daily  10  A.M.  to  10  P.M. 
Sundays  9  A.M.  to    4  P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 

APPOINTMENT 

• 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Phone  UNderhill  1-5995 

• 

582  CASTRO 

(Bet.  18th  and  19th  Sts.) 

San  Francisco,  Cahf. 


A  Gourmet's  Rendezvous 

(A)  Wonderful  luncheons  and  din- 
ners. Tempting  Italian  dishes  a 
specialty  of  the  house.  Paoli's  hot, 
original  hors  d'oeuvres  served 
daily  during  the  cocktail  hour 
from  our  featured  Hot  Hors 
D'Oeuvres  Cart. 

(B)  A  touch  of  the  old  San  Francisco 
color  and  nostalgia  blended  into 
this  modern  era  of  better  dining 
in  an  atmosphere  of  congeniality 
and  typical  Paoli  hospitality. 

(C)  A  swank  Oyster  Bar  for  those  pre- 
ferring daily  fresh  delicacies  from 
the  cool  waters  of  two  oceans. 
A  great  favorite  among  guests 
who  really  know  and  appreciate 
good  food. 

347  MONTGOMERY 

San  Francisco,  California 


Jf>riL  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  43 


GL.  4-2544 

ZIG'S  CABINET  AND   FIXTURE 
WORKS 

Plastic  Sink  and  Table  Tops 

Custom  Built  Cabinets  and  Fixtures 

for  Home,  Office  or  Store 

HARRY   C.  ZIEGLER 

715  FRANCISCO  BLVD. 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


R.  WEIER 

Heating  and  Sheet  Metal 
Air  Conditioning 


807   FRANCISCO    BLVD. 
SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

LEGAL  PHOTOGRAPHY 
DAY  &  NIGHT 

GEORGE   R.  WHEELER 


68  BROOKDALE  AVENUE 
SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


THE  TELEVISION  CENTER 

CHARLES  E.   WALSH 


1233  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


SAN     RAFAEL     PLATING    WORKS 

HIGH   GRADE   ELECTRO    PLATING 

Gold    •    Silver    •    Nickel 

Copper    •    Chromium   Plating 

R.    D.   WALTON 

Telephone  GL.   3-0918 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


KLEIN  TV  SERVICE 

GEORGE    KLEIN 

GL.   4-4269 
850  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

San   Rafael  General   Hospital 

1120   NYE   STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


STEWART'S 
Cake  Shop 


1134  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


Piihlic  Information  Programs  for  Po- 
lice (Traffic) — July  6-10.  For  police 
officers  with  public  information  functions 
in  relation  to  traffic  safety  in  city  or 
state  police  tiepartmcnts.  The  course  will 
center  around  discussions  of  public  in- 
formation activities  that  have  been  found 
successful,  and  techniques  in  contacting 
and  aiding  newspapers,  radio  stations, 
television  stations,  school  safety  pro- 
grams, and  civic  groups,  and  uses  of 
special  emphasis  campaigns  and  display 
advertising.  Theodore  Loveless,  assist- 
ant director  of  extension  services  for  the 
traffic  Institute,  will  conduct  the  course. 
Fee  is  $40. 

Supervisory  Officers  Training  Course 
— July  6-17.  For  police  officers  with 
command  or  supervisory  responsibilities, 
and  personnel  and  training  officers.  The 
course  will  emphasize  subjects  which  will 
help  the  supervisor  to  better  understand 
human  relationships  and  deal  more  ef- 
fectively with  police  personnel  at  all 
levels.  Glenn  Carmichael  of  the  Traffic 
Institute  will  conduct  the  course.  Fee 
is  $75. 

Traffic  Engineering  Field  Stud\ 
Methods  (Unit  0«cj— July  6-10.  Open 
to  traffic  engineers  and  others  with  engi- 
neering backgrounds  working  in  closely 
related  activities,  such  as  city  planning 
and  development.  Lectures  and  discus- 
sion will  be  devoted  to  accident  analysis, 
traffic  volume  studies,  parking  studies, 
origin-destination  studies,  and  speed  and 
delay  studies.  George  W.  Barton,  engi- 
neering director  of  Associated  Consult- 
ants, Evanston,  III.,  who  is  consultimr 
engineer  to  the  Traffic  Institute,  will 
coordinate  the  seminar.    Fee  is  $50. 

Traffic  Ejigineering  Techniques  of 
Regulation  (Unit  Tii'o) — July  6-10. 
Open  to  participants  in  Unit  One  given 
in  1952,  and  to  those  whose  backgrounds 
are  such  as  to  indicate  knowledge  of 
fundamental  research  problems  in  traffic. 
WTIl  cover  types  and  applications  of  traf- 
fic signals,  and  signs,  use  of  arterial 
streets,  prohibition  of  turns,  regulation 
of  curb  parking,  use  of  parking  meters, 
pedestrian  control,  pavement  markings, 
one-wav  systems,  and  flexible  lane  usage. 
The  course  is  planned  primarily  to  deal 
with  traffic  engineering  techniques  which 
produce  the  maximum  utility  from  the 
existing  street  system.  George  Barton 
will  coordinate  the  seminar.    Fee  is  $50. 

Traffic  Safety  Seminar  for  Xeicspa- 
pcrmen — July  8-10.  Purpose  of  the  sem- 
inar is  to  provide  newspapermen  with  a 
working  knowledge  of  the  traffic  prob- 
lem and  the  means  to  combat  it  and  to 
encourage  their  support  in  informing  the 
public  about  the  seriousness  of  traffic 
accidents  and  congestion.  The  role  of 
the  newspaper  in  a  sustained  traffic  safety 


WE'RE  NE1GHBORL1' 

WASH  -  O  -  MAT 

3-Day  Dry  Cleaning  and  Shirt  Service 

Phone  GL.  3-9859 

875  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

E.  C.  WOOD  FUEL  CO. 

Distributor  Mobilgas,  Mobiloil 
P.  O.  BOX  500 


SAN    RAFAEL 


CALIFORNIA 


WEST  END   BEAUTY  CENTRE 

HELEN  AND  ROSE 
1721   FOURTH  STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

MURRAY  WHITE 

HANCOCK  DISTRIBUTOR 
Gasoline    •    Lubricating  Oil  and  Greases 

451    FRANCISCO  BOULEVARD 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

A.  M.  WEDEL  •  W.   F.  WEDEL 

Public   Accountants 

Phone  GL.  3-6026 

2210  FOURTH  STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


THE  MUSIC  BOX 

1618  SECOND  AVENUE 

CALIFORNIA 


SAN    RAFAEL 


GLenwood  3-753S 

WHITE  FURNITURE  CO. 

The  Best  Selection  of  Unfinished 
Furniture  in  Marin  County 

3RD  &  D  STREETS 

Opposite  Post  Office 
SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

GLenwood  4-6252 

CROCKETT'S  VAN  AND  STORAGE 

Moving    •    Storage    •    Packing    •    Crating 

AERO  MAYFLOWER — America's  Finest 

Long  Distance  Moving  Service 

522  B  STREET 

SAN  RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


PACIFIC  PRINTERS 

Commercial   and   Advertising  Printing 

Lithography     *     Letterpress 

Custom   Typography    and   Designs 

LOTHAR  SALIN 

GLenwood  4-4489 

713  FRANCISCO    BLVD.    (Hiway  101) 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


Golden    Gate    Furniture    Company 

GLenwood   4-2042 
FOURTEEN   EIGHTEEN  FOURTH 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


Page  44 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


COMPLIMENTS   OF 

VILLA  REST  HOME 

25   VILLA   AVENUE 
SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

TREND  O'  FASHION 

1136  FOURTH   STREET 
SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GLenwood  3-1617 

WESTERN   FURNITURE  CO. 

1848   FOURTH  STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

LES    WALSH 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

246    D    STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

GLenwood  4-1373 

WING  SING  LAUNDRY 

Cane  Chair  Repairing 
914  LOOTENS  PLACE 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  5024-W 

SAN  ANSELMO  AUTO  BODY  CO. 

Bodies.  Fenders,   Frames,  Painting,  Glass 
Front   Wheel  Aligning 

640  SIR  FRANCIS  DRAKE  BLVD. 

SAN    ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

ROMANO  BEAUTY  SALON 

GLenwood  4-1347 
536  SAN  ANSELMO  AVENUE 

SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

James  A.  McFaden  -  Chief  Engineer 

TELTECH   ENGINEERING 

Electronic  Consulting    *     High  Fidelity  Sound 

State  Licensed  Engineers — GL.  4-3609 

35  SCENIC  AVENUE 

SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

BLUE  CROSS  SMALL  ANIMAL 
HOSPITAL 

322  SAN  ANSELMO  AVENUE 

SAN    ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

WINTER   HARDWARE 

WILLIAM  WINTER,  Owner 
Hardware    •   Paint    •    Houseware 

429  SAN  ANSELMO  AVENUE 

SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 


PEG'S      OVEN 

"Featuring  Home  Made  Pies" 
Open  7  A.M.  to  7:30  P.M. 

417  SAN  ANSELMO  AVENUE 
SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 

DRAPERIES    •    UPHOLSTERY   •    SLIP  COVERS 

FURNITURE 

TOWN   and   COUNTRY 
INTERIORS 

GL.  4-1712 

91    REDHILL  AVENUE 

SAN   ANSELMO  CALIFORNIA 


program  will  be  stressed  throughout  the 
seminar.  L.  J.  McEnnis,  Jr.,  ih'rector  of 
publications  of  the  Traffic  Institute,  is 
the  seminar  coordinator.    Fee  is  $15. 

Accident  Records  and  Their  Uses — 
July  13-17.  Sponsored  by  the  National 
Safety  Council  for  city,  county,  and  state 
personnel  who  work  with  traffic  records. 
The  course  provides  training  in  collect- 
ing and  processing  of  accident  data  for 
use  in  traffic  accident  prevention  work. 
Course  director  is  David  M.  Baldwin, 
director  of  the  traffic  division  of  the 
Council.    Fee  is  $40. 

Training  for  Police  Instructors — July 
20-24.  For  command  personnel  in  train- 
ing or  personnel  supervision,  and  other 
training  and  personnel  officers.  Topics 
covered  include  determination  of  train- 
ing needs  with  the  use  of  records,  basic 
traffic  training  for  recruits,  principles  of 
teaching,  factors  that  condition  learning, 
use  of  visual  aids,  use  of  reports  and  rec- 
ords in  training,  preparation  of  training 
outlines.  Students  will  have  opportuni- 
ties to  review  other  department  training 
programs  and  source  material  used  in 
training.  Glenn  Carmichael  will  conduct 
the  course.    Fee  is  $40. 

Seminar  for  Driver  Education  Teach- 
ers— August  10-21.  Designed  to  give 
teachers  a  clear  picture  of  the  newest 
developments  in  all  aspects  of  highway 
transportation  as  well  as  current  prob- 
lems in  driver  education.  It  will  offer 
the  teacher  the  unusual  opportunity  of 
discussing  present  and  future  problems 
of  highway  transportation  with  out- 
standing leaders  in  the  field.  Among 
topics  discussed  are  new  problems  and 
solutions  in  motor  vehicle  administra- 
tion, traffic  police  work,  motor  vehicle 
design  and  maintenance,  traffic  engineer- 
ing, street  and  highway  construction, 
traffic  cases  in  court,  pedestrian  protec- 
tion, traffic  laws,  vocational  opportuni- 
ties in  highway  transportation,  and  train- 
ing problems  in  driver  education.  Forrest 
R.  Noffsinger  of  the  Traffic  Institute 
will  direct  the  course.   Fee  is  $75. 

Further  information  may  be  obtained 
by  writing  the  Traffic  Institute,  1 704 
Judson  A\enue,  E\'aiiston,  111. 

MARGIN   OF  SAFETY 

Experienced  professional  drivers  al- 
ways leave  a  margin  of  safety  between 
cars.  Never  follow  another  car  closer 
than  a  full  car's  length  at  ten  miles  an 
hour.  And  when  you're  moving  faster, 
leave  a  proportionately  larger  margin  of 
safety,  advises  the  California  State  Auto- 
mobile Association.  That's  the  way  to 
prevent  rear-end  collisions. 


LEON  J.  WOLLENBERG 

General  Insurance 
939  SIR  FRANCIS  DRAKE  BLVD. 

KENTFIELD  CALIFORNIA 

RED   ROBIN  CATERERS 

LEONARD   and  ALBERTA   TEW 

GOURMET   SPECIALTIES  SHOP 

Glassware-Silverware- Dinnerware  Rented 

GL.   4-1828 

1028  SIR  FRANCIS  DRAKE  BLVD. 
Opposite  College   of  Marin 
KENTFIELD  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  458 

SAUSALITO  FURNITURE  STORE 

Let    Us    Furnish  Your  Home 

QUALITY   FURNITURE 

APPLIANCES 

HARRY    BRAUN 
1417    BRIDGE  WAY 

SAUSALITO  CALIFORNIA 


Sausalito  Venetian  Blind  Company 

Sausalito    1270-W 
328  PINE  STREET 

SAUSALITO  CALIFORNIA 

Telephone  Sausalito   1038 

Less  Than  Ten  Minutes  from   San  Francisco 

REST  VIEW  CONVALESCENT 
HOME 

AT  WALDO  POINT 

JANE  WATKINS,  Owner  and  Manager 

POST  OFFICE  BOX  298 

SAUSALITO  CALIFORNIA 


Sausalito  Boat  Building  Works 

FRANK   C.    PASQUINUCCl 
MARINE   WAYS 

Telephone   Sausalito   970 
FOOT   OF  TURNEY   STREET 

SAUSALITO  CALIFORNIA 


TOYON  TERRACES  is  a  community 
of  dream  houses  which  have  been 
individually  architect-designed  in  con- 
temporary style,  and  custom-built  to 
meet  specific  requirements  of  each 
family. 

Homes  which  trap  the  sun,  exploit 
the  views,  and  blend  with  their  natural 
settings  for  the  best  in  indoor-outdoor 
living,  are  testimony  to  the  skill  of 
well-known  architects. 

Inspiring  marine  and  mountain  views 
are  not  marred  by  unsightly  poles  and 
wires — all  utilities  are  underground. 

ROB  ROSE,  Owner  &  Developer 

HIGHWAY  101  and  CURRY  AVE. 
Sausalito,   Calif.  Sausalito    1513-W 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  45 


Phone   DUnlap   8-37SS 

MASTER  CLEANERS 

Pick  Up   &  Delivery  Service    •    Laundry   Service 
9  CAMINO  ALTO— ALTO  Y 

MILL  VALLEY  CAIFORNIA 

SALLYS 

SALLY   -   BILLIE  •   DARROLL 
Cocktails    *    Modem  Cabins 

DUnlap    8-9991 
REDWOOD   HIGHWAY   101 

MILL   VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 


2  A.  M.  CLUB 

MONTFORD  AVENUE 

MILL  VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

X-RAY  ENGINEERING  COMPANY 


76S  REDWOOD  HIGHWAY 

MILL    VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 


THE  BROTHERS 

DU.   8-9971 

6-8   LOCUST  STREET 

MILL  VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS   OF 

SAM'S  ANCHOR  CAFE 

GE.   S-4S27 


TIBURON 


CALIFORNIA 


DEED  SEA  FISHING 

$4.00  per  day 

HAZEL'S  SEA  FOOD 

PRINCETON-BY-THE-SEA 
Phone  Moss    Beach  2951 

Fresh  Bait    •    Short  Orders 

Boats  Leave  6:30,  7:00  &  7:30  A.M.  Daily 

Returning  at  2:30  P.M. 

MEL  PARRITT,  Owner 

PARRIOTT  PONTIAC 

Pontiac  Cars  and  International  Trucks 

Phone  102 

1224  ADAMS  STREET 

ST.    HELENA  CALIFORNIA 

Electrical  Appliances  Floor  Coverings 

SEARS  FURNITURE 

NEW  and  USED 

Telephone  336 

1429  MAIN  STREET 

ST.  HELENA  CALIFORNIA 


Check   Passer  Gives  Advice 

1.  Don't  cash  checks  for  strangers. 

2.  Don't  advance  cash  on  drafts  or 
checks  deposited  for  collection. 

3.  Don't  leave  counter  checks  on  cor- 
ridor desks. 

4.  Don't  give  check  books  to  any  but 
depositors. 

5.  Don't  accept  any  check  or  draft, 
payable  through  a  bank  outside  the  state. 

6.  Don't  accept  checks  not  properly 
made  out,  not  dated,  et  cetera. 

7.  Don't  cash  checks  for  women, 
when  same  are  payable  to  men,  and 
vice  versa. 

8.  Don't  cash  checks  for  strangers 
when  endorsed  by  a  depositor  unless  you 
verify  endorsement  by  phone. 

9.  Don't  cash  counter  checks  drawn 
on  any  other  bank. 

10.  Don't  cash  checks  that  are  not 
properly  endorsed. 

11.  Don't  cash  checks  unless  signa- 
ture is  regular. 

12.  Don't  cash  travelers'  checks  un- 
less same  are  countersigned  in  your 
presence. 

13.  Don't  cash  checks  when  the  face 
of  the  check  appears  to  be  in  the  same 
handwriting  as  the  endorsement  on  the 
back  of  same. 

14.  Don't  cash  a  check  given  the 
"rush"  act. 

15.  Don't  endorse  any  check  unless 
you  are  ready  to  pay  for  same  as  your 
best  friend  will  "sting"  you. 

16.  Don't  cash  any  check  when  the 
amount  of  the  check  is  greater  than  the 
purchase,  as,  nine  times  out  of  ten,  it  is 
fictitious.  J.   R. 

"J.  R."  was  a  most  accomplished  check 
passer.  Before  his  arrest  and  conviction 
here  he  had — while  using  twenty-eight 
aliases  —  passed  hundreds  of  checks 
throughout  California.  The  members  of 
the  Check  Detail  had  been  kind  to  him 
and  he  volunteered  to  write  the  above 
listed  "don'ts"  to  protect  what  he  laugh- 
ingly called  "our  gullible  citizens." 

Editor. 

Slow  Down  at  Blind  Corners 

Almost  everyone  has  had  the  experi- 
ence of  walking  hurriedly  past  or  around 
the  corner  of  a  building  and  bumping 
into  another  person.  Such  pedestrian  col- 
lisions are  generally  passed  of?  with  apol- 
ogies. But  when  a  motorist  in  a  hurry 
drives  fast  past  or  around  a  blind  corner, 
the  California  State  Automobile  Asso- 
ciation points  out  the  result  is  often  a 
serious  or  fatal  collision  that  apologies 
can't  rectify. 


DICK'S  CAFE 

Where  Old  and  New  Friends  Meet 

AL  SOHL,  Proprietor 

SHARPS  PARK  CALIFORNIA 

DINE  AND   DANCE 
AT 

MORI'S  POINT 

MARIE  and  LLOYD  JONES,  Owners 


SHARP  PARK 


CALIFORNIA 


COUNTY  ROAD 

LANDIS  MARKET  AND   SHARP 
PARK   FOOD   MARKET 

1195  SAN  FRANCISCO   BLVD. 

SHARP    PARK  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  FLanders  5-9980 

GENE  AND  GEORGE  SHELL 
SERVICE 

Independent  Dealers 

Tires    •    Batteries    •    Accessories 

Shell   Petroleum  Products 


GEORGE  FANUCCHl 


SHARP    PARK 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  4817 

GRANELLI  AND  COOK 

CHRYSLER  AND  PLYMOUTH  DEALERS 

INTERNATIONAL  TRUCKS  AND 

FARM  EQUIPMENT 


HALF  MOON  BAY 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Half  Moon  Bay  4750 

MIRAMAR   HOTEL 

Dining    *    Dancing    •    Cocktails 
WALTER  and  CHRISTINE  ACLES 

ROUTE  1.  BOX  112 

HALF  MOON  BAY  CALIFORNIA 

FRANK  TORRES  BEACH   HOTEL 

AT  MONTARA 
Excellent  Food    *    Cocktails 

Coast   Highway  #1 
MONTARA  CALIFORNIA 

ARCANGELI  GROCERY 

Wines    •    Liquor    •    Vegetables 
Pittsburgh  Paints 

AL  ARCHANGELI  and  BILL  CULLERS 
Owners 


PESCADERO 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  46 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April.  1953 


SAN    RAFAEL    FRENCH    BAKERY 

1553  FOURTH   STREET 
SAN  RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

BARONIAL  CAKE  SHOP 

"Our   Creations — Your  Temptations" 

1007    C   STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

GLenwood    3-6368 

ORIGINAL 

4TH  STREET  LIQUOR  STORE 

SAM  ORRU    •   EDDIE  RODRIGUES 

710   FOURTH   STREET 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

GL.    3-1040 

DR.  JOHN  H.  MISENHEIMER 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Hours  Daily  9:30  to  5:30 
Evenings   Tues.,  Fri.,  7  to  9 

805  FIFTH  STREET 
SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GLenwood  3-2032 


FOOD  MART  LIQUOR  STORE 

PAUL  PICKART,  Prop. 

FIFTH  AT  TAMALPAIS 
SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


O.  L.  KING  &  COMPANY 


436   CLEMENTINA  STREET 


SAN   FRANCISCO 


CALIFORNIA 


THE  COUNTRY  GARDEN 

Trees,  Shrubs,   Garden  Supplies,  Bedding  Plants 

Open   9:00-5:30  Except  Wednesday 

Phone  DU.   8-0754 

1020  REDWOOD  HIGHWAY   (Tiburon  Wye) 

MILL    VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 

VALLEY  HARDWARE 

Under  New   Management 

Hardware,  Garden   Equipment,   Tools 

DU.  8-2463 

247   SHORELINE    HIGHWAY 

MILL  VALLEY  CALIFORNIA 


UNION   SERVICE  STATION 

SECOND   AVENUE   AT  LINCOLN 
SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


Watch  Those  Lights 

SACRAiMENTO— Drivers  are  still 
disregarding  the  flashing  red  lights  on 
stopped  school  buses  and,  what's  worse, 
they're  still  killing  and  injuring  students, 
the  California  State  Highway  Patrol  re- 
ported. 

The  Patrol  cited  recent  cases  where 
several  children  were  injured,  one  fa- 
tally, by  motorists  who  sped  past  buses 
displaying  the  flashing  red  lights. 

Officials  pointed  out  that  when  the 
red  warning  lights  are  in  operation,  all 
vehicles  approaching  a  school  bus  from 
either  direction  must  come  to  a  halt  and 
remain  standing  until  the  lights  go  out. 

The  law  requires  the  bus  driver  to 
operate  the  lights,  the  Patrol  explained, 
only  when  he  stops  to  take  on  or  dis- 
charge youngsters  who  must  cross  the 
road  or  highway. 

If  the  bus  stops  to  pick  up  or  let  out 
school  children  who  live  on  the  same 
side  of  the  road,  then  the  driver  is  not 
permitted  to  flash  his  red  lights  and  other 
vehicles  may  proceed  normally. 

The  Patrol  said  a  school  bus  ride  is 
one  of  the  safest  ways  to  travel  in  Cali- 
fornia, but  that  the  children  faced  their 
greatest  danger  crossing  the  road  before 
getting  on  or  after  getting  off  the  bus. 

"If  drivers  will  stop  when  they  near 
a  school  bus  with  flashing  red  lights," 
said  the  Patrol,  "then  even  that  danger 
can  be  minimized." 

BATTERY  CABLES 

Automobile  battery  cables  should  be 
kept  clean  and  free  from  corrision  in 
order  to  insure  efficient  battery  perform- 
ance. The  California  State  Automobile 
Association  points  out  that  corrosion  oc- 
casionally forms  on  the  battery  posts  to 
which  the  cables  are  attached,  causing 
trouble  in  starting.  Tapping  the  battery 
cable  at  the  point  where  it  attached  to 
the  battery  post  with  a  wooden  hammer 
handle  or  any  wooden  object  will  some- 
times eliminate  the  short  circuit  tempo- 
rarily, thus  permitting  the  engine  to  be 
started. 

Conference  Slated 

The  60th  Annual  Conference  of  the 
International  Association  of  Chiefs  of 
Police  will  be  conducted  September  13- 
17,  1953,  in  Detroit,  Michigan. 

Conference  headquarters  will  be  in  the 
Statler  Hotel. 

Commissioner  Donald  S.  Leonard  of 
the  Detroit  Police  Department  will  be 
host  to  the  law  enforcement  officials. 


BECKS  ASSOCIATED  SERVICE 

2746   REDWOOD    HIGHWAY 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

TAMALPAIS  MARKET 

PRODUCE    DEPARTMENT 
SECOND   &  D   STREETS 

SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

WAITS  SIGNAL  SERVICE  STATION 

THIRD   &  IRWIN  STREETS 
SAN   RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  GLenwood  3-9850 

NEW  SHANGHAI   RESTAURANT 

THE  HOME  OF  CHINESE   DISHES 

Finest  Tea  and  Candy 

907   B   STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 

WILKINS  HOTEL 

MOST    ACCOMMODATING 

All   Heated   Rooms 

GLenwood   3-99S3 

1135   FOURTH   STREET 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


COMPLIMENTS 

of  a 

FRIEND 


POEHLMANN   PHARMACY 

GLenwood   3-1406 
1246   FOURTH   STREET,  Corner  C 

SAN    RAFAEL  CALIFORNIA 


MARY  A.   ROSS 

190  PARKER   STREET 

SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

C.  STELLING 

Groceries,   Fruits    and    Vegetables 
Phone   Mission   2404 

Cor.   29TH  &   CHURCH  STREETS 
SAN    FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Flanders  5-3787 

WANDER  INN 

JOE  and  MAGGIE   DELUCCHI 

Cocktails  and  Liquors 

ONE-HALF  MILE  SOUTH  OF  ROCKAWAY 

PEDRO  VALLEY  BEACH  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  4-672  Giorgina  Petroni,  Prop. 

VICTORY  RESTAURANT 

Italian  Dinners    •    Real  Home  Cooking 
Beer  -  Wines  -  Plate  -  Lunch  -  Short  Orders 


HALF  MOON  BAY 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Half  Moon  Bay  9887 

Cowley's  Ocean   Beach  Tavern 

Cocktails    •    Fine  Food    •    Dancing 
ONE  MILE  WEST  HIGHWAY  1 

MIRAMAR  CALIFORNIA 


FAIROAKS  PARK 

SUNNYVALE 

3-Bedroom  Homes 

$10,125 

V.A.  and   F.H.A.  Terms 

Color  Construction  Company 

Tract   Office   RE.  6-5063 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  47 


Phone   28 


PARADISE  CAFE 

Luncheon    •    Dinners    •    Fountain  Service 

42  SOUTH  THIRD  STREET 

PATTERSON  CALIFORNIA 


MOM'S    PLACE 

Home  Cooking    •    Complete  Meals 
Beer   and  Wine 


465  MAIN  STREET 

PLEASANTON  CALIFORNIA 

ALWAYS  AT  YOUR  SERVICE 

PLEASANTON   FEED  AND   FUEL 

Hay    •    Grain   •    Poultry  Supplies 
Nursery  Stock 

Charles  G.  Bubies — Joseph  S.  Coporusso 
801    MAIN   STREET 


PLEASANTON 


CALIFORNIA 


BUY  AND  SAVE 
UNITED  STATES  BONDS 


Phone  Upland  311-25 

SYCAMORE  INN 

Since  1849 
V.  C.  Hinrichsen 

Finest  Continental  Cuisine 
DINING   IN  THE 

GREEN   ROOM 

Six  Private  Dining  Rooms 

Organ  and  Piano  Entertainment 

No  Federal  Tax 

OPEN   EVERY  DAY 

BEAR  GULCH 

Cucamonga,  Calif. 


Merced  Moves  Ahead 

( (.'itfitifiufd  from  page  t  ) 

ards  and  facilitate  the  flow  of  traffic 
through  and  within  the  City.  Coleman 
has  discontinued  the  use  of  two  wheel 
motorcycles  in  his  department.  There 
were  many  reasons  for  this  action,  pri- 
marily, the  extreme  hazard  to  the  rider. 
The  patrol  car  which  replaces  the  two 
wheel  motorcycle  can  be  used  to  a  much 
greater  advantage  in  this  City.  Recently, 
two  additional  cars  were  added  to  the 
Department,  making  a  total  rolling  stock 
of  six  cars,  two  three  wheel  motorcycles 
and  one  truck,  which  is  used  by  the  Hu- 
mane Officer.  All  rolling  equipment  used 
for  patrol  work  and  traffic  enforcement 
has  been  painted  the  distinctive  and  con- 
spicuous black  and  white  since  Chief 
Coleman  took  office  in  September.  All 
rolling  equipment  is  equipped  with  three 
way  radio  including  the  humane  officer's 
truck. 

The  Traffic  Bureau  has  lost  its  iden- 
tity, and  all  functions  of  this  bureau  in- 
cluding the  enforcement  of  parking  meter 
regulations  have  been  made  a  responsi- 
bility of  the  patrol  division.  At  present, 
two  officers  are  attending  a  course  in  acci- 
dent investigation  cosponsored  by  the 
Northwestern  University  Traffic  Insti- 
tute and  the  State  Department  of  Edu- 
cation. 

Detective  Bureau 

The  detective  bureau,  under  the  super- 
vision of  Lieutenant  Lee  McSwain,  has 
duties  primarily  concerning  the  investi- 
gation of  felonies.  The  identification 
bureau  is  also  under  the  direction  of 
Lieutenant  McSwain.  It  is  hoped  and 
believed  that  the  Department's  statisti- 
cal records  will  become  more  impressive 
as  improved  investigation  techniques  are 
introduced  and  put  into  practice.  Mc- 
Swain is  a  capable  investigator  and  super- 
visor and  is  so  regarded  throughout  the 
San  Joaquin  Valley. 

Juvenile  Bureau 

The  juvenile  bureau  of  the  Depart- 
ment has  been  successful  in  its  chief  ob- 
jective of  crime  prevention  and  has  an 
enviable  record  in  this  respect.  Juvenile 
Officer  Jack  Ford,  who  has  for  some  time 
carried  out  an  effective  program  with  the 
youth  of  Merced,  is  also  well  known 
throughout  the  State  for  his  work  with 
the  Central  California  Juvenile  Peace 
Officers  Association.  Chief  Coleman 
states  that  since  his  main  objective  is 
crime  prevention,  this  important  bureau 
cannot  function  properly  without  suffi- 
cient men  and  equipment.  Soon  after  as- 
suming the  office  of  Chief,  Coleman 
added  an  Assistant  Juvenile  Officer  and 
assigned  a  police  car  to  the  juvenile  bu- 
reau.    Also,    larger    and   more   suitable 


Merced  Auction  &   Sales  Yard 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  F  Branco 

SALE  EVERY  WEDNESDAY 

2  Miles  North  on  Highway  99 

Phone  1218  —  P.  O.  149 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

KANTEEN   MARKET 

Vejelables    •    Fresh  Fruits    •    Groceries 
Off  Sale  Liquor 

COR.  16TH  AND  P  STREETS 

Phone  451 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  3174 

DUN'S  MARKET 

A  Complete  Market 
705  BENNETT  ROAD 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   161 


-M 


State   Farm   Insurance  Companies 

LIFE    •    AUTOMOBILE    •    FIRE 

All  Auto  Insurance  Is  NOT  Alike 

12  WEST  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  3153 


MERCED 


THE   HUT 

RAY  and  ERNIE 
1635  M  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  3141  "Air  Cooled" 

JOE  B's 

"The  Friendliest  Spot  in  Town" 
FINEST  IN  MIXED  DRINKS   •    MEALS 

1730  "L"  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

SONORA  CAFE 

Specializing  in  Mexican  Dishes 
WINE    •    BEER 

525  WEST   16TH   STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone   1493-W 

N.  P.   BLAKEMAN  AND  SON 

Brick  Mason  Contractors 

299  EAST  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


CLUB  JOAQUIN 

San   Joaquin  Valleys  Gayest  Spot 

Entertainment  and  Dancing  Nightly 

Genuine  Italian  Spaghetti 

and  Select  Sea  Food 

SOUTH  OF  HIGHWAY  99 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


CROSS  LUMBER  COMPANY 

COMPLETE  UNE  OF 
BUILDING  MATERIALS 


MERCED 


Phone  1 


CALIFORNIA 


FERRERO  ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL  CONTRACTING 

Pacific   Pumps    •    G.  E.  Appliances 

Whirlpool  Washers 

Television  Sales  and  Service 

235  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 
MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Page  48 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Jpril,  1953 


Phone  1293 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

VERNON'S  DRIVE-IN 

1035  SIXTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1513 


FOOD  CENTER 


Beer 


A  Complete  Line  of  Groceries    •    Wine 
Open  Until  Midnight 
355  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 
MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  543 

COMPLIMENTS  OF 

BARDINI'S  PLUMBING  SERVICE 

1301   M  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Business  Phone  2446-J 

ARGALL'S   ICE  CREAM 

FREEZER  FRESH 

Sandwiches  and  Coffee    •    Fountain 

1827  L  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  1904-W  John  Anthene 

ANTHENE'S  SPAGHETTI   HOUSE 

Italian  and  American  Food 
HIGHWAY  99  NORTH 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  3056 

LYTAL'S  MARKET 

Quality  Meats  and  Groceries 
1799  EAST  21ST  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

RADIO  SERVICE  SHOP 

Phone  974 
1624  L  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1826 

Four  Star  Drive  In  Market 


MERCED 


21  ST  AND  G  STREETS 

CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1559 

SERVICE  OIL  &   BUTANE  CO. 

Butane    •    Tanks    •    Appliances 
17TH  STREET  AND  BENNETT  ROAD 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2113-J 

BRADBURY  CLEANERS 

A  Complete  Cleaning  Service 
1401   16TH  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2236-R 

MARIE'S  KITCHEN 

SPECIALIZING  IN  HOME  COOKING 

Steaks  of  All  Kinds  with  Sea  Food  Salad 

1623  N  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  953 

MERCED  ELECTRIC  SHOP 

Kelvinators    •    G.  E.  and  Maytag  Products 

436  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  1307 

Esther's  New  Strand  CofFee  Shop 

For  Those  Who  Are  Fussy  About  Their  Food 

661   WEST  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  1732-J 

MERCED   DINETTE 

BREAKFAST   •    LUNCH 


MERCED 


Fountain  Service 
1628  L  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


quarters  have  been  provided  for  their 
use.  Coleman  is  also  encouraging  all 
officers  to  thoroughly  acquaint  themselves 
with  juvenile  procedure. 

One  man  who  serves  quietly  but  effi- 
ciently is  Captain  Mahlon  Stanley,  who 
is  now  in  his  17th  year  with  the  Police 
Department.  He  has  served  under  seven 
chiefs  and  has  been  Acting  Chief  himself 
four  times  during  these  years.  Each  new 
officer  has  found  that  at  some  time  Cap- 
tain Stanley  is  the  only  one  able  to  sup- 
ply the  answer. 

Chief  Coleman  is  consistently  seeking 
measures  that  can  add  improvements  to 
the  Department,  already  well  organized 
and  functioning  to  capacity.  The  people 
of  Merced  are  behind  their  new  Chief 
and  under  his  leadership  the  people  can 
feel  assured  of  continued  progress  in 
crime  prevention  and  law  enforcement. 

Cornell — Old  Name  in  Merced 

(Continued  from  page  6) 

his  path.  Slowly,  however,  the  sheriff 
won  his  battle.  Merced  became  as  clean 
and  orderly  as  any  city  of  comparable 
size  in  California  and  Cornell  continued 
to  win  elections  in  spite  of  an  element 
which  fondly  remembered  the  good  old 
days  and  did  its  best  to  restore  them. 

Today,  after  five  terms  in  office,  the 
main  problem  facing  Sheriff  Cornell  is 
the  county  jail.  Like  many  peace  officers 
all  over  the  United  States  he  has  discov- 
ered that  the  last  place  the  taxpayers 
want  to  see  their  money  go  is  into  a  penal 
institution.  He  is  frank  to  admit  that  jail 
conditions  are  not  ideal  in  Merced 
County,  but  points  out  that  by  stretching 
a  little  a  long  way  and  concentrating  on 
cleanliness  he  has  at  least  made  the  place 
livable.  Recently  the  Merced  County 
Grand  Jury  complimented  him  on  doing 
the  best  he  could  under  the  circum- 
stances. 

The  history  of  the  Merced  County 
Sheriff's  office  goes  back  to  1885  when 
Charles  Bloodworth  was  elected  to  the 
post  of  sheriff  and  tax  collector.  In  those 
days  Merced  was  little  more  than  a  vil- 
lage and  the  fertile  country  which  now 
surrounds  the  city  was  in  a  large  degree 
parched  and  useless. 

More  poeple  came  to  the  county  with 
advanced  irrigation  methods  and,  when 
Charles  Warfield  was  elected  to  his  third 
term  as  sheriff -tax  collector  in  1892  the 
jobs  were  split.  Since  that  time  the  sher- 
iff's office  in  Merced  County  has  steadily 
progressed,  both  in  methods  and  size  un- 
til reaching  the  present  modern,  well- 
manned  office  over  which  Sheriff  Cornell 
presides.  A  great  deal  of  that  credit  can 
be  given  to  Cornell  who  has  spent  more 
than  twice  as  long  as  any  other  man  as 
the  chief  law  enforcement  officer  of  the 
countv. 


GOODFELLOW'S  GRILL 

Chinese  Dishes  Served  at  All  Hours 


512  M  STREET 
Corner  State  Highway 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


CEREGHINO'S  GROCERY 

913  J  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


LEONARD  TANK  LINES 


MERCED 


625  J  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1103 


Blaine  and  Simas,  Props. 


MERCED  AUTO  TOP  SHOP 

Convertible  Tops  a  Specialty 
Furniture  Upholstering  and  Awnings 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2154 


Mr.  and  Mrs.  Palomino,  Owners 


LA  PALOMA  CAFE 

Genuine  Mexican  Dishes    •    Tamales,  Enchiladas 

Orders  to  Take  Out 

1621   L  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  280-J  Harry  Heil,  Prop. 

GRADE  GROCERY 

Groceries    •    Gas    •    Oil    •    Beer 

26TH  AND  G  STREETS 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Shops  in  Reedley   and   Selma 
Phone   11  Rubie   Bollin  Almgren,   Prop. 

REEDLEY  FLOWER  SHOP 

Flowers  for  All  Occasions 
1112  G  STREET 

REEDLEY  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  3143 


TURF      CLUB 

FOR  FINE  MIXED  DRINKS 

BOB  AND  GLEN 


1613  M  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2383 


P.  O.  Box  857 


SAN  JOAQUIN   MOTEL 

Merced's  Newest  Motel 
Completely  Air  Conditioned 

JOHN  and  RENA  BOITO 

JUST  6  BLOCKS  NORTH  OF  DOWNTOWN 
ON  HIGHWAY  99 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone:  Day  1260        Night  21925 

FERRO    BROS. 
TRUCKING   CO. 

GENERAL  HAULING 

Complete  Cargo  Insurance 

fred  v.  young 

Anderegg  Drive  &  Yosemite 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  49 


Phone  268S-J 

MAXWELL  GROCERY  STORE 

Complete  Line  of  Groceries 
940  WEST  THIRTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  3194 


CENTRAL   HOTEL 


MERCED 


Popular  Rates 
1710  L  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2739-W 


MERCED 


THE  COBBLE  SHOP 

First  Quality  Materials 
Expert  Workmanship 

EARL    R.  JENKINS.  Prop. 
620  WEST  18TH  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1972 

MISSION   BOTTLING  COMPANY 
OF  MERCED 

Bottlers  of  Mission  Flavors 
and    Hires   Root    Beer 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1873 

COMPLIMENTS   OF 

SPROUSE  REITZ  CO. 

434  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2505 

DR.  HAROLD   M.  OLIVER 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Hours:  10  A.M.  to  4  P.M. 

335   -   18TH  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  892 

MIDVALLEY 

WHOLESALE  GROCERS 
Featuring  Nationally  Advertised  Products 

P.  O.  Box  1310 
15TH  AND  H  STREETS 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  65 

NEW    MERCED 
BAKERY 

French  and  Italian  Bread 
Cakes  and  Pies 

320  Seventeenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Associated   Public 
Communications  Officers 

John  H.  Atkinson,  President 
Thom.ss  a.  B.wi.EY,  Secy.-Treas. 

The  fifteenth  anniversary  meeting  of 
the  Northern  California  Chapter  of 
APCO  Inc.  was  held  at  Rickey's  Red 
Chimney  in  San  Francisco  on  February 
15,  1953.  Henrj'  Bogardus  and  George 
Hippely  were  hosts. 

The  meeting  was  called  to  order  at 
1 1 :30  a.m.  by  President  Jack  Atkinson 
of  the  Santa  Clara  County  Communica- 
tions Department.  Round-table  introduc- 
tions revealed  that  33  members  and 
guests  were  in  attendance.  Treasurer 
Mason  reported  on  the  condition  of  the 
treasury  and  that  1953  dues  were  now 
payable. 

President  Atkinson  appointed  the  fol- 
lowing committees  for  1953: 

Frequency  Allocation  and  Engineer- 
ing Committee:  Mc.Murphy,  Chairman; 
Mason  and  Keller. 

Inter-Chapter  Relations  Committee: 
McDole,  Chairman ;  Bogardus. 

Operating  Procedure  Committee: 
Lewis,  Chairman  ;  Bayley,  Hippely  and 
Mason. 

Commercial  Relations  Committee:  OI- 
sen.  Chairman  ;  Deetkin  and  Robertson. 

Constitution  Revision  Committee: 
Board  of  Directors  and  Charles  Simpson. 

A  discussion  was  held  on  the  Point  to 
Point  System.  Frank  Roach  from  the 
State  Office  of  Civil  Defense  announced 
the  coming  CPX  on  Wednesday,  Feb- 
ruary 18. 

After  a  discussion  of  the  joint  meeting 
with  the  Southern  Chapter,  Ivan  Hud- 
son made  a  motion  that  we  hold  it  in 
Santa  Cruz  some  time  in  April.  After 
a  second  by  Lewis  the  group  voted  in 
favor  and  then  discussed  the  program. 

Art  McDole  spoke  on  the  revision  of 
the  National  Constitution  and  By-laws. 
Jim  Lewis  suggested  that  any  change  in 
the  organization  should  be  submitted  to 
all  chapters  and  that  they  should  be 
polled  and  ratify  any  change. 

The  meeting  was  adjourned  for  lunch 
at  12:10  p.m.,  and  after  a  delicious  re- 
past we  reconvened  at  1 :20  p.m. 

A  frequency  of  45.58  mc  for  Clovis 
was  approved  on  a  motion  by  McDole 
and  a  second  by  McMurphy. 

The  Association  discussed  the  problem 
of  police  and  fire  usage  of  frequencies 
in  Marin  County. 

Two  small  bills  were  ordered  paid. 

On  a  motion  by  Hartnett,  seconded 
by  LeBoeuf,  the  secretary  was  directed 
to  dispense  with  the  return  postal  cards 
unless  the  host  requested  them. 

A  discussion  was  held  on  the  eligibility 
of    Railroad   Radio   membership   and   it 


"Fred" 


"Angelo" 


B  A   R   D   I   N   I   '  S 


Plumbing    •    Hardware      •    Windmills 

Appliances    ■    Water  Systems    •     Water  Heateri 

Building  Supplies    •    Heating  Equipment 

Service  Station  Equipment 


Phone  1543 
1301    M  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  252S 


CENTRAL   FURNITURE  SALVAGE 
COMPANY 


1423  J  street 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone   319S 

EL  PORVENIR 

MR.  and  MRS.  G.  A,  RAMIREZ,  Props. 

Meats    •    Vegetables    •    Fruits    •    Groceries 

Masa  Tortillas    •    Tamale  Dough 

Beer  and  Wine 


864  -  13TH  STREET 


MERCED 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  1188-1187 

NEW  MERCED   MOTEL 

Air-Condi  tioned 

Rates:  Single  $3.50;  Double  $5.00  and  up 

Under  New  Management 

Family  Rooms  for  6 

ON  HIGHWAY  99 — NORTH  OF  ARCH 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


TONY'S  MARKET 

Groceries    •    Meats    •    Wine    •    Beer 

Phone  4S9-J 
1122  R  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 

Phone    124 


B.  B.  McGINNIS  CO. 

UNIFORMS  FOR  EVERY  PURPOSE 
Men's  Wear 

547  I  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


TOPPER  JEWELRY 

Thoughtfully,  Lovingly  Yours 
DIAMONDS 

AT  SPECTACULAR  SAVINGS 

Use  Your  Credit 

533  Seventeenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Page  50 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  195.^ 


COZY  MOTEL 

JOHN  H.  D'ALONZO,  Manager  and  Owner 

"Rest  and  Sleep  Off  the  Noisy  Highway" 

Kitchen  Privileges  with  Electric  Refrigerators 


MERCED 


Telephone  2251 -J 
HIGHWAY  140  EAST 


CALIFORNIA 


TWO-WAY  RADIO  EQUIPPED  CABS 

MERCED  TAXI 

"Prompt    and  Courteous  Service" 

GLEN  T.  GAINES,  Manager 


Phone  173 
642  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


BRUNELLI  JEWELRY  STORE 

Merced's  Oldest  Established  Jewelry  Store 

Phone  341 
523  SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


B.  B.  McGINNIS  CO. 

Everything  in  Uniforms 
Men's   Wear 

547    SEVENTEENTH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


GEORGE  E.  DRAY 

MASONRY  CONTRACTOR 


Telephone  2442-W 
721  EAST  21ST  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Joe  Briazolara,  Prop. 


"Air  Cooled" 


JOE  B's 


"The  Friendliest  Spot  in  Town" 

Finest  in  Mixed  Drinks    •    Meals 

Booths  for  the  Ladies 


MERCED 


Phone  3141 
1730  L  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


j    Telephone  2523 


MERCED  MOTOR 
SALES 

Geo.  L.  Johnson  and  Son 

We  Service  All  Makes  of  Cars 

Oldsmobile    -    Cadillac 

335  Sixteenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


was    decided    that    they    could    become 
associate  members. 

Past  President  Hippcly  gave  thanks 
for  all  the  cooperation  he  received  dur- 
ing his  term  of  office. 

Commercial  members  reporting  were: 
Robbie  Robertson  of  W.  D.  Brill  Co., 
Mr.  Parmetter  of  the  Parmetter  Tower 
Co.,  J.  Dillon  of  Silentel  Cabinet  Co., 
Vic  Zackaria  of  Zack  Radio  Co.,  Carl 
Holmes  of  the  P.  T.  &  T.,  Jack  Tynes 
of  the  P.  T.  &  T.  Co.,  Clyde  Daven- 
port of  Leece  Neville  Co.,  Bill  Kellogg 
of  Kelmicro  Associates,  and  Barney  Ol- 
son of  Motorola. 

Captain  McMurphy  reported  on  the 
proposed  agenda  of  the  California  Com- 
munications Advisory  Board,  of  which 
he  is  a  member,  at  Sacramento  on  Feb- 
ruary 17,  1953.  He  read  a  portion  of  a 
bill  on  a  proposed  microwave  system  for 
the  Market  News  and  law  enforcement. 
Comments  were  made  by  Lewis,  Mason 
and  Holmes. 

Berkeley  or  Emoryville  were  offered 
for  the  next  meeting  and  unanimously 
accepted. 

On  a  motion  by  Lewis  and  second  by 
Bayley  the  February  meeting  of  the 
Northern  Chapter  of  APCO  was  ad- 
journed in  the  memory  of  our  friend, 
Clifford  E.  Peterson,  Commissioner  of 
the  California  Highway  Patrol,  who  has 
been  an  Honorary  Member  of  this  Asso- 
ciation for  many  years. 

Respectfully  submitted 

THOMAS  A,  BAYLEY 
Secretary 

RETIRED  POLICE  STEED 
BOWS  OUT 

Goodbye,  Folks !  This  is  my  last  parade ! 

Never  again  shall  I  proudly  dance 
To  waving  flags,  to  brave  bands  played, 

No  more  champ  my  bit  and  gaily 
prance. 

I'll  miss  my  friends  on  Market  Street, 
The  lumps  of  sugar  I  loved  so  well ; 

I'll  miss  the  tramp  of  countless  feet, 
The  raucous  note  of  newsboys'  yell. 

I'll  be  lonely  for  the  old  windmill, 
The  Sunday  crowds  at  the  Beach  and 
Park, 
My  climbs  to  the  top  of  Strawberry  Hill, 
But,   most  of   all,   for   a  hand   in   the 
dark. 

I'm  on  my  way  to  pastures  green  and 
fair, 
To  loaf  in  the  sunshine  and  dream  all 
day, 
'I'o  dream  of  my  master  and  wish  he  were 
there ; 
I   wonder  if  God  hears  horses  when 
they  pray! 

J\Iiss  Virgie  Tiimnons. 


Phone  386 

MATS 

AUTO   :-:  TRUCK   :-:  FIRE 

George  E.  Souders  and 
Robert  F.  Kemps 
District  Managers 

1834  "K"  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1234 

LEONARD  TANK 
LINES 


625  "J"  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1878 

Compliments  of 

L.  C.  BUD  JIRSA 

Richfield  Oil  Products 


West  16th  and  "T"  Streets 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  2693-J 

JOHN   HOWELL 

Photographer 


51  Twenty-First  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Ami.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  51 


Phone  88 

MAZE  DRUG  STORE 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
pat  lewis 

Corner  17th  and  L  Streets 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  3082 

RICE    BOWL 

The  Home  of  That  Famous 
Chow  Meiii 

"We  Specialize  in  American  and 
Chinese  Dishes" 

We  Make  Fresh  Noodles  Daily 

909  Sixteenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1221 

"Lefs  Get 
Associated^' 

CLYDE    A. 

H  E  R  LI  TZ 

DISTRIBUTOR 


Tide  Water 
Associated  Oil  Co. 

16TH  AND  "G"  STS. 
Merced,  California 


The  Long  Road 

By  Kathli£i;x  Blair 

It  began  in  nineteen-eleven. 

It  will  end  in  nineteen  fifty-three. 

The  long  and  well  executed  career  of 
a  good  man  and  a  good  officer. 

In  the  course  of  forty-two  years  with 
the  San  Francisco  Police  Department 
Captain  Leo  J.  Tackney  has  proven  to 
be  the  capable,  efficient  and  fine  law  man 
that  the  department  hoped  he  would  be. 

In  1Q33  Leo  was  appointed  to  the 
rank  of  captain  and  has  since  done  a 
great  job  in  upholding  his  respected  posi- 
tion. 

During  the  time  he  has  served  on  the 
force  he  has  had  many  experiences  that 
ha\  e  been  both  hiuiiorous  and  serious. 

He  has  seen  them  all,  from  the  drunk 
\vho  is  booked  for  causing  a  disturbance 
to  the  sneak  thief,  prowler,  sex  offender, 
and  murderer. 

The  young  punk  who  was  arrested  for 
trying  to  crash  a  party,  the  rapist  who 
caused  women  to  fear  going  out  at  night, 
the  purse  snatcher  that  prayed  on  the 
lonely  streets  in  the  dark  evening — have 
all  been  Captain  Tackney 's  prisoners. 

He  was  there  the  night  a  cursing, 
fighting,  heartless  killer  was  brought  into 
the  precinct  station  and  questioned. 

He  was  there  the  night  a  call  came  in 
on  a  juvenile  girl  who  had  been  severely 
beaten  up. 

When  he  arrived  at  the  scene  a  \oung 
girl  stood  there,  eyes  wide  with  fright, 
swollen  and  bruised  lips  trembling  as  she 
awaited  the  ambulance,  blood  oozing 
slowly  out  of  her  small  nose,  and  large 
welts  all  over  her  arms  and  legs  where 
she  had  been  repeatedly  struck  hard 
blows  that  only  a  cruel  and  sadistic  per- 
son could  have  administered  to  such  a 
defenseless  being. 

There  have  not  only  been  beatings, 
and  murders  to  keep  the  captain  busy, 
but  there  have  been  countless  holdups, 
shop-liftings,  and  robberies  to  help  oc- 
cupy the  report  sheets  on  his  desk  and  in 
his  files. 

Many  years  ago  a  holdup  man  had  his 
activities  abruptly  ended  when  Captain 
Tackney  took  up  the  chase  following  a 
series  of  robberies. 

The  waiting  and  watching  paid  off  one 
night  when  the  culprit  was  caught  in  the 
act  of  breaking  into  a  store ;  it  was  with 
grave  anxiety  that  the  once  hard  and 
tough  bandit  now  meekly  faced  the  strap- 
ping young  officer  who  covered  him  with 
his  forty-five. 

It  goes  without  saying  that  there  are 
many  such  stories  to  be  told  on  this  of- 
ficer, but  each  would  only  add  up  to  the 


Phone  3094 


THE  RITZ  CLUB 

BANQUET  ROOMS 

Excellent  Foods 

Can  Accommodate  Up  to  100 
People 

bly  jones,  chef 

350  Seventeenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1103 

MERCED  AUTO  TOP 
SHOP 

Convertible  Tops   -   Tailored 
Seat  Covers  and  Awnings 

1617  "K"  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


EVERGREEN 
MEMORIAL 
PARK,  INC. 

Marion  C.  Hughson,  Pres. 
Margaret  E.  Burrell,  Secy. 


Entombment 
INURMENT  -  Cremation 

Memorial  Gardens 


400  "B"  STREET 

Merced,  California 


Page  52 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


T.  E.  Kendrick,  Ph.  1549 


F.  J.  Oneto,  Ph.  959 


SERVICE  OIL  &  BUTANE  CO. 

Stove  and  Diesel  Oil    *    Butane 
Tanks    *    Appliances 

I7TH  STREET  AND  BENNETT  ROAD 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


N.  P.  BLAKEMAN  AND  SON 

BRICK  MASON  CONTRACTORS 

Phone  1493-W 
299  EAST  17TH  STREET 

MERCED  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  59 

MERCED  HARDWARE 
&  IMPLEMENT  CO. 

Aeromotor  Windmills  -  Fuller 

Paints  -  Builder's  Supplies 

Grocery  and  Kitchen  Ware 

Fishing  Tackle  and  Guns 

Toys  -  Riding  Equipment 

520  West  Seventeenth  Street 
MERCED,  CALIFORNIA 


BEST  WISHES 

from  the 

SISTERS  OF 

MATER 

MISENCORDIAE 

HOSPITAL 


MERCED 
CALIFORNIA 


same  thing  .  .  .  his  gallantry  as  a  fine, 
confident,  honest,  sincere  police  officer 
whose  only  thought  is  that  of  doing  his 
job  to  the  utmost. 

The  department's  second  loss,  again  at 
Ingleside  station,  is  that  of  Lieutenant 
Humphry  Kelleher  who,  after  thirty- 
three  years  of  service,  is  also  retiring 
along  with  his  very  able  co-worker  and 
friend.  Captain  Tackney. 

Lieutenant  Kelleher  has  been  with  the 
different  substations  as  well  as  the  traffic 
bureau  as  a  fixed  post  officer. 

Kelleher  filled  a  job  which  only  the 
finest  of  men  can  be  chosen  to  do,  because 
only  someone  who  is  alert,  and  ever 
watchful  for  the  hot  car  thief,  the  drunk 
driver,  the  jay  walker  and  the  potential 
reckless  car  killer,  covild  do  this  job  with 
the  elan  that  it  must  have  to  be  a  success. 

Both  of  these  excellent  rank  officers 
are  married  and  have  children. 

Captain  Tackney  has  several  commen- 
dations and  a  meritorious  service  award 
to  his  credit,  and  has  this  to  say  to  the 
incoming  members  of  the  department : 
"For  the  young  man  coming  into  the  de- 
partment, police  work  is  the  most  honor- 
able profession  in  the  world.  There  are 
plenty  of  opportunities  for  advancement 
if  the  officer  applies  himself  and  treats 
the  people  as  he  would  want  to  be 
treated." 

Lieutenant  Kelleher  says,  "Right  now 
conditions  are  far  better  than  they  were 
thirty  years  ago.  Any  young  man  with 
the  ambition  should  concern  himself  with 
advancement.  Be  conscientious  and  keep 
out  of  trouble,  and  at  all  times  use  diplo- 
macy toward  the  public.  If  you  do  all 
these  things  well  you  will  be  a  fine  of- 
ficer." 

So  we  close  another  chapter  in  the 
lives  of  two  more  men,  who  for  over 
three  decades  served  their  public  with 
dignity,  fairness  and  pride. 

Captain  Leo  J.  Tackney  and  Lieuten- 
ant Humphrey  Kelleher  will  go  down 
now  in  the  honor  book  along  with  the 
many  other  men  who  have  served  their 
public,  their  God,  and  their  country  with 
the  judgment  only  the  best  of  police  of- 
ficers can  maintain. 

THE   HEAVIEST  PENALTY 

Reckless  driving  is  subject  to  severe 
penalties  imposed  by  state  law,  but  the 
severest  penalties  of  all,  warns  the  Cali- 
fornia State  Automobile  Association,  are 
death  or  disability  imposed  by  the  law  of 
impact.  Reckless  drivers  should  realize 
that  they  can't  elude  the  consequences  of 
either  law  for  long. 


LEMOORE  CAFE 

Italian  Home  Cooking  Our 
Specialty 

Oh  and  Off  Sale  Beer,  Wine 
and  Liquors 

317-22  Heinlen  Street 
LEMOORE,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  5-2451 


FOURSOME  CLUB 


Meats  -   Groceries  and 
Liquors 


Cor.  Ventura  and  Clovis  Ave. 
FRESNO,  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  2-2197 

CHICAGO  FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

Cy  Darbinian 
Complete  Home  Furnishers 

1357  Van  Ness 

Corner  Tuolumne 

FRESNO,  CALIFORNIA 


DESERT  INN 
Fine  Foods    -    Cocktails 

Bill  Hamrick  -  Bill  Steitz 

Whitesbridge  Road 
FRESNO,  CALIFORNIA 


Jprii  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  53 


LEMOORE 


BRIGHT  SPOT  CAFE 

Spanish  Food  Our  Specialty 
329  E  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Your  Favorite  Cocktail  at 

TUZZI  AND   ROSE 

CAFE  and  COCKTAIL  BAR 


LEMOORE 


321  E  STREET 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Calexico  434 

TIENDA  ■'28" 

Second  Hand  Clothing    •    Furniture 

28  SECOND  STREET 

CALEXICO CALIFORNIA 

JAMISON'S 

Furniture,  Appliances  and  Hardware 

New  and  Used 

Telephone  3053 

209-211    IMPERIAL  AVENUE 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 


Phones:  272;  3446 


MADELINE  BRITTON 

Customhouse  Broker 

P.  O.  Box  1109 
219  FIRST  STREET 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 


EL   RANCHITO  CAFE 

Cold  Beer  and  Mexican  Food 

SARAH  PONCE 

233  FIRST  STREET 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

Sheet  Metal  Work 

Gutters     •    Air  Conditioning    •    Coolers 

Oil  Burners    •    Gas  Heaters 

KING'S  METAL  SHOP 

Acetylene  and  Electrical  Welding 
HAROLD  E.  KING 

Phone  489 
119  THIRD  STREET 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  600 

EARL  D..  ROBERTS 

Warehousing  -  Hauling 

Licensed  Customhouse  Broker 

Importer,  Exporter  and 

Forwarder 

Licensed  Malt  Beverage 
W^holesaler  and  Importer 

215  First  Street 
CALEXICO,  CALIFORNIA 


Excerpts  from  San  Francisco 
Police  Ordinances 

(Continued  from  last  issue) 
Sec.    1116:     Taxicab,   Passenger    Ve- 
hicle for  Hire.    "Stand." 

1.  A  taxicab  operates  on  a  time,  or 
mileage  basis,  and  is  equipped  with  a 
taximeter,  but  limousines,  etc.  are  not  so 
equipped. 

2.  Is  of  a  distinctive  color,  approved 
by  the  Chief  of  Police. 

3.  Passenger  controls  both  route  and 
destination. 

4.  Public  Vehicle  for  Hire  includes 
every  type  of  privately  owned,  motor 
propelled,  passenger  carrying  vehicle  for 
hire,  over  which  the  City  and  County  of 
San  Francisco  may  exercise  control. 

5.  The  vehicle  "stands"  designated  by 
the  Chief  of  Police  may  be  used  only 
while  awaiting  employment. 

Sec.  1117:    Regulations. 

Under  this  section,  and  all  sections  to 
1186,  the  following  provisions  cover  the 
operation  of  taxicabs,  limousines,  et  cet- 
era: 

1.  The  Chief  of  Police  designates 
the  location  of  "stands"  around  public 
squares  for  vehicles  for  hire. 

2.  Around  public  squares  vehicles  for 
hire  may  not  stand  on  cross  walks  or  in 
double  lines. 

3.  A  taxicab  must  have  a  distinctive 
color,  approved  by  the  Chief  of  Police. 

4.  A  driver's  license  is  granted  on  an 
approved  showing  of  citizenship,  resi- 
dence, et  cetera. 

5.  Vehicles  for  Hire  must  have 
"name"  conspicuously  printed  thereon. 

6.  Drivers  must  have  accurate  way 
bills  of  each  trip. 

7.  Disputes,  as  to  amount  of  fare, 
must  be  decided  by  the  police,  either  at 
a  police  station  or  at  the  point  of  depart- 
ure, within  the  City  and  County  of  San 
Francisco. 

8.  LTpon  demand,  a  passenger  must  be 
given  a  receipt  for  amount  paid,  said  re- 
ceipt to  be  on  a  form  approved  by  the 
Chief  of  Police. 

9.  The  flag  must  not  show  in  "re- 
cording" unless  actually  employed. 

10.  It  is  a  misdeamenor  to  refuse  to 
pay  legal  fare. 

11.  Schedule  of  rates  must  be  con- 
spicuously printed  inside  vehicle,  and  in 
such  manner  as  the  Chief  of  Police  shall 
prescribe. 

12.  No  charge  shall  be  made  for  time 
during  temporary  delays  for  repairs  due 
to  breakdowns,  et  cetera. 

13.  Drivers,  runners,  and  soliciting 
agents  secure  their  permits  from  the 
Chief  of  Police. 

14.  Within  24  hours  the  driver  must 
report  lost  or  found  property  (of  value) 
to  the  Bureau  of  Inspectors. 


Twin  Cities  Seed  and   Feed  Co. 

Insecticides    "     Poultry  Supplies    "     Baby   Chicks 

Vegetable  and  Field  Seeds 

Moist  Cutworm  Bait  Mixed  to  Order 

207  IMPERIAL  AVENUE— Phone  SSI 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

CALEXICO   BAKERY 

JUAN   A.    PACHECO 

Phone  209 
501   THIRD  STREET 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

RAMONA  APTS.  AND   ROOMS 

MRS.   ELIZABETH   COODE 

Reasonable  Rates 

Phone  771 

509  IMPERIAL  AVENUE 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

SING  LEE  GROCERY 

FRANK  WONG 

Groceries    '    Meats   •    Vegetables    •    Fruits 

Telephone  247 

CORNER  5TH  &  BLAIR  AVE. 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

LA  VOZ  DEL  PUEBLO 

ABARROTES  Y  CARNICERIA 

Grocery  and  Meat  Market 

Phone  3045-253 

526  SECOND  STREET 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 

LOS  ANGELES  GROCERY 

Groceries    •    Fruits    •    Vegetables    •    Fresh  Meats 

Phone  450 — We  Deliver 

839  IMPERIAL  AVENUE 

CALEXICO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  9126 


Joe  Alias,  Prop. 


JOE'S  MOBILE  SERVICE 

Tires    •    Batteries    •    Accessories 
99  HIGHWAY  AND  MERCED 

FOWLER  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  4641 

YOSH  HONDA 


HARRY  HONDA 


HONDA'S  GARAGE 

Motor  Tune-Ups  and  General 

Automotive  Repairing 

Wheel  Aligning   and  Balancing 

FIFTH  AND  MAIN  STREETS 

FOWLER  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  2596 

VERNON'S  LIQUOR  STORE 

Complete  Selection  of 

BEER   •    WINES   •   LIQUORS 

Imported  and  Domestic 

COLD  BEER 

We  Deliver 

548  NORTH  EIGHTH  STREET 

FOWLER  CALIFORNIA 


u.  s. 


OPEN   24  HOURS 

99  SERVICE  STATION 
AND  CAFE 

GAS  —  Butane,  Diesel 

TRUCK  SERVICE 

AIVAZIAN  BROS..  Prop. 


FOWLER 


Phone  9141 


CALIFORNIA 


SAY  IT  WITH  FLOWERS 
SAY  IT  WITH  OURS 

FOWLER  FLORAL  SHOP 

VICCO  C.   MADSEN.  Prop. 


Phone    5001 


FOWLER 


CALIFORNIA 


Page  54 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


BEacon  5798-W 


Adeline  Jackson,  Owner 


MESA  MOTEL 

clean,  Modern  Cabins    *    Stall  Showers 
One-Quarter   Mile   from    Beach 
415  NEWPORT  BOULEVARD 

COSTA    MESA  CALIFORNIA 

PLEASANT  VIEW  MOTEL 

MARIE  and  HERMAN  SEELOW,  Proprietors 
Phone  9-7794 

927  WEST  FOOTHILL  BLVD. — Highway  66 
FONTANA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  Anaheim  5360 

O.  A.  MEYER 

Cold  Storage  Locker  Service 
RT.  2,  7692  E.  LINCOLN  AVE. 

ANAHEIM  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Miller  3-9323 

VIKING  MOTEL 


2107  Thompson  Boulevard 
VENTURA,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  318364 


Long  Bar  Cafe  and 
A.  Martinez  Co.,  Inc. 

Groceries  -  Liquors  -  Meats 

Genuine  Spanish  Chorizos 

Mexican  Food  In  Real  Mexican 

Style 

680  Foothill  Boulevard 
UPLAND,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  316172 


Phone  9321 

AL   CAUDLE'S 
Chevron  Gas  Station 

Efficient  Service   -   Clean  Res/ 
Rooms 

Will  Be  Open  Until  Midnight  or 
Later 

99  Highway  and  Adams  Ave. 
FOWLER,  CALIFORNIA 


No  More  Sheepherders 

(Continitt'd  from  paijc  12} 

tect.  They  are  the  eyes  and  ears  of  the 
administrators  of  the  department,  charg- 
ed with  the  responsibility  of  safeguarding 
the  community  against  crime  and  other 
hazards. 

The  plans  and  tactics  devised  by  the 
department  heads  for  the  solution  of 
many  police  problems  depends  to  a  large 
degree  upon  the  information  gathered 
and  reported  by  the  patrol  division. 

Detective  Bureau 

Six  men  man  the  department's  detec- 
tive bureau,  the  division  which  handles 
the  investigation  of  Santa  Ana's  major 
crimes.  These  men  are  carefully  selected 
from  the  rank  and  file  of  the  department. 

Under  this  bureau  are  assigned  the  spe- 
cialists in  the  Identification  Bureau  and 
photographic  specialists.  The  Forgery 
Detail  handles  the  ever  growing  problem 
of  fictitious  and  forged  checks  and  has 
been  responsible  for  many  arrests  and 
convictions  for  this  offense. 

The  Detective  Bureau  is  also  charged 
with  the  warrant  and  fugitive  detail 
which  takes  persons  charged  with  an  of- 
fense through  court  as  well  as  serving 
warrants,  subpoenas  and  assisting  with 
the  return  of  fugitives. 

Pawn  Shops 

One  the  most  important  segments  of 
the  Detective  Bureau  is  the  pawn  shop 
detail.  Little  known  by  the  average  citi- 
zens, these  men  are  responsible  for  a  great 
percentage  of  the  stolen  goods  which  is 
recovered  by  the  Santa  Ana  Police  De- 
partment. A  daily  sur\ey  of  secondhand 
store  and  pawnshop  reports  is  made  for 
stolen  articles.  Sold  or  pledged  property 
reports  are  maintained  in  a  file  system, 
so  that  for  future  reference  a  report  may 
be  found  by  any  of  several  methods.  The 
persons  name  pledging  or  selling,  the  date 
the  article  was  pledged  or  sold,  the  de- 
scription of  the  article  or  the  serial  num- 
ber of  the  article  through  the  numerical 
file.  These  reports  are  made  in  triplicate, 
thus  the  dealer  maintains  one  copy  and 
the  original  and  a  copy  are  sent  to  the 
Detective  Bureau  where  the  original  is 
filed  and  the  copy  sent  to  the  Criminal 
Investigation  and  Identification  Bureau 
in  Sacramento  for  a  statewide  check 
against  stolen  reports  for  articles  men- 
tioned in  all  points  bulletins  throughout 
the   State  of  California. 

Traffic 

Santa  Ana's  traffic  headache  is  no  dif- 
ferent from  all  of  California's — and  it  is 
a  first  class  headache  throughout  the  state. 
The   Traffic   Bureau   of   the  Santa  Ana 


KIRTLEY  DO -NUT  SHOP 

Do-Nuts    •    Coffee 
Sandwiches  and  Soft  Drinks 


202  grand  avenue 

santa  ana  california 


MAXIMINO   PRECIADO 

"Beer"  the  Best 

211  NORTH  MacCLAY  STREET 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

OPEN  7  DAYS  A  WEEK 

LA  UNION   MARKET 

Groceries    '    Meats    •    Veletables 
MUNOZ  BROS. 

Phone  KI.  2-7513 
1432  WEST  FOURTH  STREET 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

DANCING  TO  THE  THREE  SHARPS 
Floor  Shows  Nightly    •    Cocktails 

DIXIE  CASTLE 

ON  HIGHWAY   101   BETWEEN  ANAHEIM  AND 
SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 


DREAM   HOMES.   INC. 

607  POINSETTIA  STREET 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

ANDERSON   PLUMBING  CO. 

Complete  Plumbing  Service 

Phone  TR.  2-8851 
620  POINSETTIA  STREET 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Klmberly  2-5071 

BLUEBIRD  MOTOR 
LODGE 

Jack  Wener,  Prop. 

21  MODERN  UNITS 

Some  W^ith  Kitchenette 

Heated  Pool 

16942  East  First  Street 
SANTA  ANA,  CALIFORNIA 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  55 


ONTIVEROS  MARKET 

Beer    •    Wine    •    Meats 

Imported  and  Domestic  Groceries 

KI.  2-937S 

12292  WEST  FIFTH 

SANTA  ANA  CALIFORNIA 

Satisfying  Your  Every  Thirst 

Mickel's  Package  Liquor  Store 

R.   A.   -DICK."  MICKEL.  Owner 

Phone  331-61 

519  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVENUE 

SAN  BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

LA  ESPERANZA  MARKET 

Tortilla  Factory — Everything  for  Tacos 
Hot  Tortillas  Evenings 

599  NORTH  MT.  VERNON 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

THE      SISSY 

A   Place  to  Meet  Friends 

BEER  and  WINE 

650  MT.  VERNON  AVENUE 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 


M  &  W  VARIETY  STORE 

5  -  10  &  2Sc  Store 
578  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVENUE 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

8  8  8      CLUB 

Beer  and  Wine 

888  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVE. 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

MARKETVILLE 

Midnight  Market 
Shop  Until  Midnight  Daily 

390  SOUTH  MT.  VERNON  AVE. 

SAN  BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

SEBASTIAN'S  MARKET 

Liquor    •    Wines    •    Beer 
658  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVE. 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 

Weekly  Rates  With  or  Without  Kitchens 

BEL -AIR  MOTEL 

FRED  BRANDENBURG.  Owner 

Klmberly  3-7766 
101   HIGHWAY  AT  C  STREET 
{\Vt  Miles  East  of  Santa  Ana) 

JUSTIN  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  Orange  973 

MEL   MEYERS 
TRAILER    SALES 

101  Highway  between 
Anaheim  and  Santa  Ana 

Mailing  Address: 

Route  2,  Box  160B 

ORANGE  COUNTY,  CALIF. 


Police  Department  has  grown  through 
the  years  from  a  small  and  relatively  un- 
important branch  of  the  department  to 
a  large  and  increasingly  important  posi- 
tion in  the  organization.  In  1928  there 
were  onl\  three  mounted  motorcycle  offi- 
cers in  the  city.  Today  the  Santa  Ana 
Police  Department  Traffic  Bureau  con- 
sists of  a  Lieutenant,  eleven  officers  as- 
signed to  solo  motors,  one  officer  assigned 
to  a  servi-cycle  and  thirteen  men  assigned 
to  the  duties  of  guarding  school  crossings. 
1  heir  task  is  no  small  one,  considering 
the  city  has  a  population  of  55,000  peo- 
ple, covers  an  area  of  10.8  square  miles 
and  contains  173.9  miles  of  highway.  The 
Traffic  Bureau  also  maintain  a  vigilant 
guard  to  protect  the  10,444  children  who 
attend  the  city's  24  schools. 

Juvenile  Bureau 

In  addition  to  their  routine  duties,  the 
officers  of  the  Santa  Ana  Traffic  Bureau 
must  investigate  all  accidents  and  submit 
reports,  check  all  abandoned  automobiles 
for  the  possibility  that  they  are  stolen, 
and  take  care  of  all  complaints  related  to 
traffic  or  highway  conditions. 

The  Juvenile  Bureau  or  Crime  Pre- 
vention Bureau  in  Santa  Ana  consists  of 
two  men.  This  includes  a  sergeant  in 
charge  of  the  Bureau  and  another  detail- 
ed from  the  Patrol  Division  to  the  bur- 
eau. These  two  men  make  investigations 
concerning  law  infractions  by  persons 
under  the  age  of  18  years.  They  have 
constant  contact  with  all  schools  through- 
out the  city  and  are  often  called  upon  h\ 
the  schools  to  assist  them  when  a  student 
becomes  a  problem  and  is  heading  for 
trouble. 

In  addition  to  these  duties  the  officer 
must  always  be  alert  around  the  places 
where  juveniles  gather  for  the  purpose 
of  their  protection  against  uninvited  per- 
sons who  might  endanger  juvenile  wel- 
fare. 

The  bureau  works  in  close  cooperation 
with  the  Detective  Bureau  in  the  investi- 
gation of  thefts  where  an  adult  is  im- 
plicated along  with  the  juvenile  ofifender. 
^\'hen  an  arrest  is  made  the  juvenile  is 
handed  over  to  the  juvenile  officer  who 
will  dispose  of  that  end  of  the  case. 

Policewomen 

Two  policewomen  are  employed  by  the 
department.  They  devote  their  time 
largely  to  crime  prevention  and  the  pro- 
tection of  juveniles  and  women.  They 
work  in  conjunction  with  the  ju\enile 
officers  in  the  handling  of  delinquent  girls 
and  in  doing  so  protect  them  from  as 
much  publicity  as  possible.  They  work 
with  the  detective  bureau  and  uniformed 
division  whenever  women  are  involved. 
Policewomen  in  the  Santa  Ana  depart- 
ment relieve  on  the  desk  detail,  compile 


Phone  3-7251 


TINTI'S    CAPE 

Specializing  in  Italian  Food 

Chicken  and  Steak 

Beer  and    Wine 

MR.  AND  MRS.  S.  TINTI,  Owners 


174S  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVENUE 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 


MT.  VERNON   MEAT  AND 
PROVISION 

Meat    "    Groceries 
Beer  and  Wine 

680  NORTH  MT.  VERNON  AVENUE 

SAN   BERNARDINO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  6-6178 

THE  MOUNT  VERNON 
FEED  STORE 

OSCAR  S.  SWALLOW,   MGR. 


1208  Mount  Vernon 
SAN  BERNARDINO,  CALIF. 


Telephone  4787 

TRIANGLE  CERTIFIED 
CONCRETE,  INC. 

RED  -  E  -  MIX  CONCRETE 

Office  and  Plant: 
1355  Twenty-Fourth  Street 
SAN  BERNARDINO,  CALIF. 


Telephone  4787 

TRIANGLE  CERTIFIED 
CONCRETE,  INC. 

RED  -  E  -  MIX  CONCRETE 

Office  and  Plant: 
1355  Twenty-Fourth  Street 
SAN  BERNARDINO,  CALIF. 


Page  56 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


MR.  AND  MRS.  CHAUNCEY  P.  STARR.  JR. 
Owners  and  Operators 

TRAVELERS  MOTOR  COURT 


Telephone  CHarleston  8-3201 
3611  NORTH  SAN  FERNANDO  ROAD 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

CHarleston  6-8432 

DUKE  WELDING  SERVICE 

BOB  DUKE.  Proprietor 

General  Welding 
Trailer  Frames  and  Hitches 
Metallizing    •    Metal  Spray 

1028  WEST  BURBANK  BLVD. 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

FAMOUS  COAST  TO  COAST 
Established   1900 


CHILI  JOHN'S 

Chill  "As  You  Like  It" 


CHarleston   6-3611 

2018  BURBANK   BOULEVARD 

Corner  of  Keystone 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 


BURBANK  LIQUOR 

"See  Dave" 

CH.  8-0323 
925  WEST  BURBANK  BLVD. 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 


CHarleston  6-3522 

GARDEN  COURT 
MOTEL 

Pat  and  Marie  Shaughnessy, 
Owners 

Kitchen  and  Overnight  Cabins 
Daily  and  Weekly  Rates 

1009  N.  San  Fernando  Blvd. 
BURBANK,  CALIFORNIA 


CHarleston  8-2891 

PLASTI-GRAPH 
PRODUCTS  MFG.  CO. 

Precision  Fabrication 

Fine  Engraving  on  Plastics 
Plastic  Signs 

3072  Avon  Street 
BURBANK,  CALIFORNIA 


statistics  for  the  Federal  Bureau  of  Iden- 
tification and  the  CII,  take  charge  of  all 
property  to  be  kept  as  evidence,  maintain 
records  of  personnel  and  report  to  the 
personnel  office.  A  major  portion  of  their 
time  is  spent  investigating  neighborhood 
conditions,  checking  stores  in  the  shop- 
ping area  for  shoplifters  and  correcting 
irregularities  that  may  occur  between 
husband  and  wife  that  can  result  in  being 
a  contributing  factor  to  juvenile  delin- 
quency. 


Chief  Hershey 

Record  Bureau 

The  Record  Bureau  of  the  Santa  Ana 
Police  Department  contains  all  reports 
and  correspondence  of  the  department  in- 
cluding fingerprints,  mug  files  and  bulle- 
tins from  other  departments.  At  present 
there  are  on  file  in  the  Santa  Ana  record 
bureau  12,450  mugs  and  fingerprint 
cards.  The  arrest  files  contain  34,000 
cases  and  increase  rapidly  in  the  fast 
growing  Southern  California  community. 
Records  are  kept  on  the  test  firing  of  all 
guns  processed  through  the  department, 
concealed  weapon  permits  and  the  pur- 
chase of  firearms.  Pawn  slips  are  carded 
for  comparison  and  filing  in  the  numeri- 
cal index.  Three  clerks  card  and  file 
these  on  a  rotating  basis.  Each  clerk 
knows  all  the  work  and  no  individual  is 
assigned  to  any  particular  duties.  These 
girls  handle  large  volume  of  phone  in- 
quiries and  check  countless  records  every 
day.  The  Chief's  secretary,  in  addition 
to  the  duties  assigned  to  that  position,  is 
charged  with  the  supervision  of  the  Rec- 
ord Bureau. 


VETERANS  GROCERY 

Groceries    •    Fruits    •    vegetables 
Also   Beer  and  Wine 

1195  OAK  STREET 

SAN  FRANCISCO  CALIFORNIA 


CH.  6-9132 


Res.  AR.  3-9774 


BEN'S  LIQUOR  STORE 

BEN  and  DON  SHUBEN 

1915  NORTH  SAN  FERNANDO  ROAD 
BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  CHarleston  8-5881  Adults  Only 

Vega   Motel  &  Trailer  Court 

3414  NORTH  SAN  FERNANDO  BLVD. 
Near  Hollywood  Way 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

CHarleston  6-9485  Free  Delivery 

LORRY'S  MARKET 

Quality  Groceries  and  Meats 

1619  WEST  BURBANK  BLVD. 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

FIVE  POINTS  TRAILER  PARK 

Clean,  Friendly,  Convenient 

Ph.   CH.   0-2909 

922  WEST  BURBANK  BLVD. 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 

C  A  R  O  '  S 

Restaurant    *    Motel 

CHarleston  6-9660 

3601  NORTH  SAN  FERNANDO  BLVD. 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 


SPECIFICATION 

PACKAGING 

ENGINEERING 

CORPORATION 

Domestic  and  Export 

Military  -  Aviation 

Industrial  -  Commercial 

Packaging  -  Crating 

Documentation 

Shipping  -  Pick-Up 

Service 

Government  Inspection  at  Our 
Facility 

CHarleston  0-4852 

ROckwell  9-2443 

.  .  .  SPEC  PACKAGING  .  .  . 

3080-3086  North  Avon  St. 

Burbank,  California 

Member  Industrial  Packaging 
Engineers  of  America 


Aprii  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  57 


UNDER  NEW  MANAGEMENT 
of   SIGMUND  KAYNE 

GINO'S  STEAK  HOUSE 

Telephones: 

CHarleston  6-6112;  CHarleston  6-993S 

203  NORTH  VICTORY  BOULEVARD 

Between  Olive  and  Magnolia 

BURBANK  CALIFORNIA 


PACIFIC  YEAST  PRODUCTS.  INC. 

Phone  Michigan  8734 
741   KOHLER  STREET 

LOS  ANGELES  CALIFORNIA 

MACK'S  GROCERY 

Fresh  Meat    •    Vegetables    "    Beer   •    Wine 
Mailing  Address: 

Route  5,  Box  835M,  Visalia,  California 

YETTEM  CALIFORNIA 

SPORTSMANS'  CAFE 

Steaks    •    Chops    •    Complete  Dinners 
P.  O.  BOX  417 


NEWMAN 


CALIFORNIA 


ARIZONA  OSUNA  MARKET 

MIKE  R.  OSUNA 
Labor  Camp 

BALBOA  STREET 

EL   RIO 


CALIFORNIA 


ELITE  CAFE 

Featuring  Delicious  American  &  Chinese  Dinners 

Special  Dining  Room  for  Large  Parties 

Telephone  789 

1413  O  STREET 

NEWMAN  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  686 

GOMEIZ  BROS. 

LA  MOLEGA   MARKET 

Complete  Line  of  Groceries,  Meats 

and  Fresh  Vegetables 

NEWMAN  CALIFORNIA 


DELTA  CAFE 

BEER    •    WINE 
FINE  FOOD 


IVANHOE 


CALIFORNIA 


LET'S  MEET  AT 

THE  IVANHOE  SHAMROCK 

JACK  SCOVEL,  Mgr. 
Mixed  Drinks 


IVANHOE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  504 

TRAVELLERS'  REST 

INN 

Cocktails    -    Wines 

Sizzling  Steaks  and  Southern 
Fried  Chicken 

On  Highway  33 
NEWMAN,  CALIFORNIA 


All  this  is  a  far  cry  from  the  day  when 
Santa  Ana  policemen  had  to  watch  care- 
fully to  see  that  no  one  \iolated  the  speed 
law  (it  was  against  the  law  to  drive  a 
herd  of  sheep  down  a  street  at  more  than 
six  miles  per  hour)  or  to  see  that  no  one 
riding  a  bicycle  passed  a  fire  truck.  Yes, 
that's  right.  Those  laws  existed  and  had 
to  be  enforced  when  Chief  Hershey  took 
over  thirty  years  ago.  But  times  have 
changed.    And  so  has  the  department. 


COMMITTEE  ON  COURTS 

The  special  committee  of  the  Amer- 
ican Bar  Association  carrying  on  a  na- 
tional campaign  to  improve  traffic  courts 
has  received  a  grant  of  $7,500  from  the 
All  State  Insurance  Company  of  Chi- 
cago to  aid  in  expanding  the  program. 

At  the  same  time,  Albert  B.  Hough- 
ton of  Milwaukee,  Wis.,  chairman  of  the 
committee,  announced  the  appointment 
of  former  Municipal  Court  Judge  Joe 
M.  Hill  of  Dallas,  Tex.,  as  assistant 
director  of  the  ABA  Traffic  Court  pro- 
gram. Judge  Hill  will  assist  Director 
James  P.  Economos  of  Chicago  in  the 
administration  of  the  program,  which 
was  started  six  years  ago.  A  Chicago 
attorney,  Theodore  G.  Maheras,  also  has 
been  added  to  the  Traffic  Court  staff  as 
administrative  assistant  to  the  director. 
Maheras  until  recently  was  with  the 
procurement  division  of  the  United 
States  Air  Force. 

Chairman  Houghton  predicted  that 
approximately  750  cities  throughout  the 
country  would  participate  in  the  Traffic 
Court  contest  to  determine  national  lead- 
ers in  traffic  court  improvement  during 
the  last  year.  Judging  will  take  place 
in  connection  with  the  anual  meeting  of 
the  American  Bar  Association  in  Boston 
August  24  to  28. 

Another  phase  of  the  program  is  a 
series  of  traffic  court  conferences,  held  in 
key  cities  throughout  the  nation,  to  bring 
together  traffic  law  enforcement  officials, 
judges,  educators  and  others  for  instruc- 
tion courses  on  enforcement  practices, 
court  procedure,  legal  interpretations, 
and  the  like.  Five  of  these  area  confer- 
ences have  been  held  so  far  this  year.  A 
sixth  is  scheduled  for  March  30  to  April 
3  at  Northeastern  University,  Boston, 
Mass.,  and  a  similar  conference  will  be 
held  at  the  University  of  Alabama,  Tus- 
caloosa, April  13  to  17. 


Under  this  sod  is  all  that  we  found 

Of  pretty  Miss  Mary  Malone 

Who  stepped  on  the  gas 

As  a  truck  tried  to  pass. 

Her  friends  have  erected  this  stone. 


Phone   130 

LARSON  AND  CARDOZA 

Plumbing    •    Heating    •    Electrical  and 
Air  Conditioning  Contractors 

411  FIFTH  STREET 

CALIFORNIA 


CUSTINE 


RALPH'S  CLUB 

Cocktails    •    Banquets    •    Dinners 


GUSTINE 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  UHrick  3157 


BLACK  AND  WHITE 

Cafe,  Bar  and  Fountain   Service 

MR.  AND  MRS.  S.  FERNANDES 


GUSTINE 


CALIFORNIA 


GREENFIELD  DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

Outfitters  for  the  Entire  Family 

9865  SOUTH  UNION  AVENUE 
GREENFIELD  CALIFORNIA 


GREENFIELD  CASH 
MARKET 

A  MODERN  COUNTRY 
STORE 

Vern  Bell   -   Pete  McAdams 
Bob  Angleton 

Route  99  and  Taft  Highway 
GREENFIELD,  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  321-168 

EUCLID  AVENUE 
Nursing  a>id  Rest  Home 

Mary  A.  Adams,  Manager 


201  North  Euclid  Avenue 
UPLAND,  CALIFORNIA 


I\ige  58 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  1953 


Phone   196S 

PEPPER  INN 

ADOLF  AND  DOROTHY 
101  HIGHWAY,  1  Mile  South  of 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 

JOE  HUGH  •  Liquor  Store 

Phone  1539 
738  MARSH  STREET 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  7 

WEST  SIDE  GROCERY 

Groceries     "    Fruits    •    Vegetables 
Complete  Line  of  Liquors 

397  FIFTH  STREET 

GUSTINE  CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S   ROUND  UP 

GEORGE  UNDERWOOD 

Dancing  Every  Night — Sunday  3  P.M.  to  2  A.M. 

6671   MANCHESTER  BLVD. 

BUENA   PARK  CALIFORNIA 


SOARES   DEPARTMENT  STORE 
AND   FOOD   MARKET 


GUSTINE 


P.  O.  BOX  338 


CALIFORNIA 


F.  SANG  LUNG  CO. 

Groceries  and  Meat 
General  Merchandise 

505  SOUTH  FOURTH  STREET 

EL  CENTRO  CALIFORNIA 

J.  F.  GONG 

Grocery  and  Meat  Market 
Beer  and    Wine 

Phone  445 
213  MAIN  STREET 

EL  CENTRO  CALIFORNIA 

Sporting  Goods    •    Guns    •    Shells 
Fishing  Tackle    •    Live  Bait 

ACE  LIQUOR  STORE 

Liquors    •    Wines    "    Beer 
195  MAIN  STREET — Telephone  2470 

EL   CENTRO  CALIFORNIA 

LAS  PALMAS  COURT  HOTEL 
AND  CAFE -DINING  ROOM 

JOHN  BRUNNER 

In  Imperial  Valley — 

The  Valley  of  the  Smiling  Sun 

AT  EL  CENTRO,  CALIF., 

52  Feet  Below  Sea  Level 


EL  CENTRO 


Phone    1424 


CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  1215 

Benjamin  J.  Solomon 

BONDED  AND  LICENSED 
FARM  LABOR  CONTRACTOR 


230  State  Street 
EL  CENTRO,  CALIFORNIA 


TRAFFIC   RECORD   SCHOOL 

All  extensive  two-week,  course  in  "Po- 
lice Traffic  Records — Procedures  and 
Use  of  Data"  will  be  offered  at  the 
Traffic  Institute  in  Evanston,  111.,  for 
the  first  time  from  June  1  to  12,  accord- 
ing to  Gerald  O'Connell,  director  of 
training. 

Traffic  records  lie  at  the  very  heart  of 
any  effective  program  of  law  enforce- 
ment and  traffic  accident  prevention, 
Mr.  O'Connell  stated.  In  addition,  he 
said,  important  use  is  made  of  informa- 
tion from  the  records  bureau  in  all 
phases  of  a  community's  accident  pre- 
\ention  program,  including  engineering, 
education,  and  driver  licensing. 

"For  these  reasons,"  Mr.  O'Connell 
said,  "we  are  confident  that  the  invest- 
ment police  departments  make  in  sending 
an  officer  to  the  traffic  records  course  for 
training  in  the  organization,  operation, 
and  direction  of  the  records  bureau  will 
be  more  than  repaid — in  efficiency,  econ- 
omy, and  effectiveness.  " 

The  traffic  records  course  is  the  third 
new  course  offered  by  the  Traffic  Insti- 
tute in  a  new  series  of  integrated  short 
courses  developed  to  train  key  police  per- 
sonnel in  specific  traffic  functions. 

Another  new  unit  course  to  be  offered 
for  the  first  time  is  "Traffic  Law  for 
Police,"  scheduled  for  July  6-17. 

The  unit  course,  "Traffic  Law  En- 
forcement," will  be  offered  again  at  the 
Institute,  October  5  to  23,  1953.  It 
will  immediately  follow  the  three-week 
course  in  orientation  in  police  traffic 
work  to  be  held  from  September  1+  to 
October  2.  The  orientation  course  has 
been  conducted  at  the  Traffic  Institute 
since  1934  under  the  title,  "Police  Traf- 
fic Training  Course." 

The  "Police  Traffic  Records"  course 
is  open  to  commanding  officers  of  traffic 
divisions,  officers  in  charge  of  records 
bureaus,  record  clerks  and  statisticians. 
Tuition  is  $75. 

Subjects  in  the  course  are: 

Principles  and  purposes  of  record  keep- 
ing; 

Why  Records  are  essential  to  police 
traffic  service ;  importance  of  traffic  su- 
pervision calls  for  business-like  methods  ; 
examples  of  how  modern  police  manage- 
ment uses  records  in  planning,  organiz- 
ing, staffing ;  examples  of  how  problems 
are  revealed  and  action  directed  by  use 
of  records ; 

How  records  produce  data  required  by 
the  supervisor-administrator ;  kinds  of 
basic  data  needed  to  direct  police  traffic 
service ;  forms  used  in  various  areas  and 


Picnic  Grounds 


CRESCENT  PARK  AUTO-COURT 

ALBERT  and  KARIN  DAWE 

Phone  2705 

(One  Mile  South   of  Shopping  District) 

ON  THE  BUSINESS  HIGHWAY 

U.  S.  HIGHWAY  101 

SAN  LUIS   OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 


DANTE'S 

Choice  Liquors  from 

the  "Gates"  of  Heaven 

to  "Dante's  Inferno" 


Phone    2197 
955  HIGUERA  STREET 

SAN   LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 

Shop  Phone  1360  Station    Phone  2343 


SAN   LUIS  TRUCK  SERVICE 


TED  LECUYER 
Residence  Phone  1D67-W 

MANUEL   PIMENTEL 

Residence  Phone  3099-J 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 


C  A  R  V  O  '  S 

Once  You  Try  Us  You'll  Always  Come  Back 
GOOD  FOOD    •    MIXED  DRINKS 

Phone  1866 
1022  MORRO   STREET 

SAN  LUIS    OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 


Telephone  99  or  3020 

Madonna  Construction 
Company 

Bulldozers  -  Shovels  -  Dump 
Trucks   -   Materials 

Mailing  Address:  P.  O.  Box  910 

399  Freeway 
SAN  LUIS  OBISPO,  CALIF. 


WESTWAY  MARKET 

Owned  by  Bill  Mathison 
and  John  Carscaden 

A  complete  line  of 

Beer  and  Domestic  Wines 

The  finer  brands  of 

Bourbon,  Scotch  and  Canadian 

Whiskey 

open  9:00  A.M.  to  9:00  P.M., 

Sunday  included 

Open  1 1 :00  P.M.  Saturday  Nights 

447  Higuera         Phone  491-W 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO,  CALIF. 


\  April.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  59 


HOT   POINT  WESTINGHOUSE 

CLINE'S  ELECTRIC 

Merchandising    •    Repairing    •    Contracting 
Phones  13  and   14 
I  962  MONTEREY  STREET 

I  SAN  LL'IS  OBISPO 


CALIFORNIA 


Phone  271 

WARDEN'S  MACHINE  SHOP 

PRECISION  GRINDING 

424  HIGUERA  STREET 

SAN   LUIS  OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

STAG  BILLIARD  PARLOR 

Tobacco    •    Pool    •    Billiards 
960  MONTEREY  STREET 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 


ECONOMY  DRUG  CO. 

Store  No.  1 
770  HIGUERA  STREET 

Store  No.  2 
796  HIGUERA  STREET 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 


Phone   1787 

PERFECT  METHOD  CLEAr^ERS 

Synthetic  Dry  Cleaning  in  Our  Own  Plant 

983  OSOS  STREET,  Opposite  Court  House 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 

SMILE  INN 

Specializing  in  Chicken  and  Dumplings 
Truck  Stop — Always  Open 

One  Mile  South  on  Old  Highway  101 

SAN  LUIS  OBISPO  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  445 

NAKASHIMA  GROCERY 

Groceries    •     Fresh  Fish 

Beer  and  Wine 

649  WEST  KERN 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 


Compliments 

CALIFORNIA 

GROWERS 

WINERIES 


Dinuba 
California 


at  various  levels;  a  step-b\-step  accouiir- 
ing  of  each  rccorti  from  office  of  admin- 
istrator; 

Preparation  of  material  for  analysis; 
rates,  percentages,  charts,  graphs,  tables, 
making  forms ; 

Organization  for  efficient  flow  of  data  ; 
centralized  versus  decentralized  records; 
internal  organization  of  the  records  bu- 
reau ; 

The  records  office  and  its  manage- 
ment; housing  and  office  space,  person- 
nel; office  procedures  (manual),  services, 
communications,  supervision,  equipment; 

Installing  the  records  system;  estab- 
lishing procedure  policies,  steps  to  con- 
sider, techniques  involved. 

Police  chiefs  can  use  the  special  sub- 
ject unit  course  program  to  train  officers 
in  the  particular  areas  in  which  they  will 
work,  Mr.  O'Connell  said.  The  unit 
program  as  a  whole  is  designed  to  oi^er  a 
range  of  wel  rounded  training  in  specific 
areas  of  assignment,  spread  over  a  long 
period,  for  departments  which  cannot 
send  a  man  to  the  Traffic  Institute's 
nine-month  Traffic  Police  Administra- 
tion course. 


Phone  292-R  Virginia — Georg 

JENKINS'  GROCERY 

Groceries    •    Meats    •    Vegetables    •    Sundries 

DINUBA 


298  MAGNOLIA  WAY 

CALIFORNIA 


Phone  996 

DAD'S  SMOKE  SHOP 

For 

Fine  Food    •    Mixed  Drinks 

ISO  EAST  TULARE 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  506-J 

EL  MONTE   MARKET 

Meats    •    Groceries    •    Vegetables 
WEST  EL  MONTE  WAY 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 

Phone  171 

ME!   LING  CAFE 

CHOP   SUEY 

Finest  Chinese  and  American  Dishes 

189  L  STREET 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 


Phone  S31-W 


Kay  Kandarian,  Prop. 


COLLINS   RADIATOR  SHOP 

Harrison    •    Liberty    •    Williams   &  Yukon  Cores 
New  —  Used 


377y2   SOUTH  K  STREET 

DINUBA  CALIFORNIA 


FBI  Conference 

Mr.  D.  K.  Brown,  Special  Agent  in 
Charge  of  the  FBI's  San  Francisco  Of- 
fice, has  announced  that  an  FBI  Law 
Knforcement  Conference  on  I  hefts  from 
Interstate  Shipment  will  be  held  at  San 
Francisco  on  September  15,  1953.  The 
conference  is  aimed  at  additional  coordi- 
nation among  law  enforcement  agencies 
and  impro\ed  efficiency  in  dealing  with 
this  increasingly  serious  violation. 

Mr.  Brown  said  that  since  the  fiscal 
year  of  1949,  there  has  been  a  steady  rise 
on  a  national  scale  in  the  volume  of  the 
FBI's  work  in  this  category.  This  in- 
crease, coupled  with  the  fact  that  major 
crime  in  the  United  States  exceeded  the 
two  million  mark  in  1952,  for  the  first 
time  in  the  history  of  recorded  crime 
statistics,  indicated  the  need  for  such 
conferences. 

Wide  Variety 

Thefts  from  Interstate  Shipment,  ac- 
cording to  Mr.  Brown,  involve  an  ex- 
tremely wide  variety  of  offenses.  The 
type  of  property  stolen  covers  the  full 
range  of  industrial  products,  and  the 
method  of  theft  may  be  marked  with  the 
full  violence  of  a  roadside  hi-jacking.  Re- 
cent FBI  ca.ses  have  varied  from  theft  of 
a  truck  and  its  half-million  dollar  cargo 
of  radio  and  television  tubes  to  a  boy's 
pilferage  of  two  eight-dollar  lamps  from 
a  motor  van.  In  both  instances,  the 
thieves  have  been  apprehended.  Methods 
of  theft  utilized  vary  from  petty  thievery 
by  stealth  to  forging  false  destinations  on 
shipping  documents,  embezzlement,  thefts 


of  entire  vehicles  while  unattended,  and 
armed  robbery  of  drivers. 

The  problem  facing  the  FBI  is  indi- 
cated by  the  fact  that  in  the  ten-year 
period  from  July  1,  1942  to  Jvine  30, 
1952,  there  were  8,377  convictions  in 
FBI  cases  involving  thefts  from  inter- 
state shipments.  Sentences  totalled  18,- 
764  years,  7  months  and  fines  were  $608,- 
469.  Savings  and  recoveries  amounted  to 
$4,882,360.  Local  law  enforcement  au- 
thorities, Mr.  Brown  emphasized,  have  a 
similar  problem  involving  cases  where  the 
property  stolen  was  not  moving  in  inter- 
state commerce. 

Regional  Bases 

Mr.  Brown  declared  that  more  than 
one  hundred  conferences  scheduled  will 
ser\e  to  increase  coordination  of  the  work 
of  the  FBI  and  local  law  enforcement 
authorities  in  combating  such  crimes. 
This  is  particularly  true  since  the  differ- 
ence between  Federal  and  purely  local 
offenses  is  dependent  solely  upon  whether 
the  property  involved  in  interstate  or 
local,  intrastate  commerce. 

The  conferences  have  been  scheduled 
on  a  regional  basis,  Mr.  Brown  said,  and 
will  begin  in  April.  Conferences  will  be 
continued  until  December,  1953,  in  loca- 
tions offering  the  most  convenience  to  the 
participants.  Included  in  those  attending 
the  conferences  in  addition  to  FBI  per- 
sonnel, will  be  local,  county  and  state 
law  enforcement  officers,  railroad  police, 
terminal  and  dock  guards,  military  police 
and  representatives  of  other  law  enforce- 
ment agencies. 


Page  60 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


April,  195. 


And  One  Crept  .  .  . 

(Continuid  from  page  22) 

I've  tried  to  get  away  from  this  lousy 
job.  Lord,  you  don't  know  how  I've 
tried.  I  tried  to  volunteer  for  the  Raid- 
ers and  the  paratroopers.  But  they  just 
laugh.  You  ought  to  see  those  graves. 
Anyway,  they're  deep  enough  this  time." 

"Any  chaplain?" 

"That's  funny.  How  is  a  chaplain  go- 
ing to  get  up  here?"  The  sergeant 
laughted  bitterlv. 

'Why  not?"' 

"We're  cut  off.  A  couple  of  corpsmen 
tried  to  get  through  with  some  walking 
patients  and  one  got  shot  and  one  of  their 
patients  was  killed  before  thev  could  get 
back." 

''God." 

"Yeah  .  .  .  we  need  him.  The  raiders 
are  trying  to  fight  their  way  up  to  us." 

"Well  .  .  .  we  took  our  objective." 

"Yeah.  That's  the  hell  of  it.  We  took 
the  damned  objective." 

The  sergeant  looked  worn  and  old.  He 
was  a  thirteen  year  Marine,  and  had 
been  broken  about  once  for  every  year. 
He  had  one  question  left. 

"Are  there  any  more?  We've  got  to 
dig  our  own  holes  yet." 

I  looked  at  the  kid.  He  wasn't  any 
color  at  all.  Not  any  color  with  a  name 
anyway.  He  didn't  have  a  pulse.  I  closed 
my  eyes  and  tried  to  concentrate  harder, 
but  I  couldn't  feel  his  pulse. 

I  watched  his  chest.  It  was  moving. 
Barely  moving;  I  had  to  feel  it  to  be 
sure.  His  eyelids  flickered  open  and  he 
looked  up  at  me,  then  toward  the  ser- 
geant. Then  he  closed  them.  I  nodded 
to  the  sergeant. 

"Yeah,  one." 

The  three  of  them  nodded  and  walked 
back  down  the  hill  toward  the  graves.  In 
a  little  while  I  could  hear  them  digging. 
The  kid's  eyes  opened  again. 

"Doc." 

"Yeah,  kid." 

"What  time  is  it.  Doc?" 

"About  five  o'clock,  kid." 

"Will  you  straighten  my  leg?  You've 
got  to  straighten  my  leg  so  I  can  sleep 
tonight." 

Okay,  kid." 

"Will  you  straighten  it.  Doc?  Will 
you  promise  you'll  straighten  it,  Doc? 
I've  got  to  sleep  tonight." 

"You'll  sleep,  kid.  I  swear  to  God 
you'll  sleep." 

"Thanks,  Doc." 

He  closed  his  eyes  again.  His  chest 
was  hardly  moving  at  all.  The  sun  was 
getting  close  to  the  mountains.  I  couldn't 
feel  his  pulse.  Over  the  hill  I  could  hear 
the  sergeant  and  his  men  digging.  Dig- 
ging and  swearing. 

They  were  almost  ready. 


DEFENSE  BOND  SPONSORS 

S.  C.  LINEBAUGH 

WHITE  PINES,  CALIFORNIA 

PICKERING  LUMBER  CORP. 

STANDARD,  CALIFORNIA 

DOLLY  VARDEN  LUMBER  CO. 

ARCATA,  CALIFORNIA 

BLAGEN  LUMBER  CO. 

WHITE  PINES,  CALIFORNIA 

W.  D.  MILLER  LUMBER  CORP. 

ETNA,  CALIFORNIA 

SILVA'S  BLOOM  RANCH  DAIRY 

p.  O.  BOX  111,  OLEMA,  CALIFORNIA 

SAMMIE  EVANS,  INC. 

WALNUT  CREEK,  CALIFORNIA 

TARTER,  WEBSTER  AND  JOHNSON, 

INC. 

DELLEKER,  CALIFORNIA 

PENINSULA  LUMBERMAN'S  CLUB 

SAN  CARLOS,  CALIFORNIA 

DIEBOLD  MILLS,  INC. 

SMITH  RIVER,  CALIFORNIA 

SELMA  STEAM  LAUNDRY 
AND  DRY  CLEANING 

SELMA,  CALIFORNIA 

ARTHUR  J.  MAXAM  &   SONS 

RICHMOND,  CALIFORNIA 

CHARLES  H.  SEGERSTROM,  Jr. 

SONORA,  CALIFORNIA 

EDGERTON  BROS.  LUMBER  CO. 

ADIN,  CALIFORNIA 


A  Score  Settled  . . . 


S^t.  Ronald  E.  Rosser,  U.S,Armt/ 
Medal  of  Honor 


HEN  HIS  BROTHER  was  killed  in 
Korea,  Sergeant  Rosser  re-enlisted.  Several  months 
later  he,  too,  was  in  Korea— pinned  down  on  a  hill 
near  Pongil-li  by  Red  fire.  He  saw  it  cutting 
up  the  platoon.  Suddenly  he  jumped  to  his  feet. 
.Alone,  and  armed  only  with  a  carbine  and  a  gre- 
nade, he  charged  a  Red  bunker  and  cleaned  it  out. 
He  dropped  into  a  trench  and  dispatched  five  more 
enemies.  Twice,  under  heavy  fire,  he  returned  for 
more  ammunition,  then  renewed  his  attack.  His 
one-man  fight  was  furious— and  short.  It  ended  with 
13  enemy  dead,  the  American  platoon  saved,  and  a 
score  settled  for  Sergeant  Ronald  Rosser. 

"When  a  man  gets  back  from  Korea,"  says  Ser- 
geant Rosser,  "it  does  him  good  to  see  people— like 
you— investing  hard-earned  money  in  our  country's 
Bonds.  Sure,  Bonds  are  a  practical  way  to  save 
money,  I  know.  But  they  also  help  build  production 
power  — io  arm,  equip  and  protect  men  overseas. 
And  that's  proof  to  people  like  me  that  people  like 
you  really  care." 


Peace  is 


for  the  strong!  For  peace  and  prosperity 
save  ivith  U.S.  Defense  Bonds! 


Now  E  Bonds  pay  3%  !  No-.v,  improved  Series  E  Bonds 
start  paying  interest  after  6  months.  And  average  37o  in- 
terest, compniinded  semiannually  when  held  to  matur- 
ity! Also,  all  maturing  E  Bonds  automatically  go  on 
earning— at  the  new  rate  — for  10  more  years.  Today,  start 
investing  in  U.S.  Series  E  Defense  Bonds  through  the 
Payroll  Savings  Plan  at  work. 


The  V.  S.  Government  does  not  pay  for  this  advertisement.  It  is  donated  by 

thii  publication  in  cooperation  with  the  Adfertising  Council  and  the  Magazine 

Publishers  oj  America. 


'! 


Sec.  34.66  P.  L.  t  R. 
U.   S.   POSTAGE 

PAID 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Permit  No.  3172 


Return  Poctare  Goarmnteed 
4SS  Tenth  Street,  San  Francisco  < 


S+ohl,  Nels 

270  Claremont  Blvd. 
San  Francisco  27,  Cat. 


S.  C.  LINEBAUGH 

LOGGING 

SUGAR  PINE  •  PONDEROSA  PINE 
DOUGLAS  FIR  •  WESTERN  RED  CEDAR 


WHITE  PINES,  CALIFORNIA 


RALPH  L.  SMITH 
LUMBER  COMPANY 


ANDERSON,  CALIFORNIA 


SAN  FRANCISCO  EDITION 


ROBERT  WARE,  new  President  of  the  California  Peace  Officers'  Association, 
receives  congratulations  from  outgoing  president,  JOHN  R.  BENNETT 


JUNE.  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


PINE  -  RED  FIR  -  WHITE  FIR  -  CEDAR 


FISHER  LUMBER  COMPANY 


LUMBER  MANUFACTURERS 


WHOLESALE  &  RETAIL  SALES 


HIGHWAY  40 


ROCKLIN,  CALIFORNIA 


^J 


CAREFUL! 


the  life  you  save 
may  be  your  own ! 


April,  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  I 


Featured  in  This  Issue 

PAGE 

Our  Parole  Problem 3 

Forty-eight  Hours  on  Saturday 4 

Slow  Down,  Mister,  Roseville  Ahead     ....  5 

Tea  Party  ^Vith  Death 6 

Ware   Heads   Peace  Officers 7 

Police   Promotional   Examination   Questions     .      .  8 

Excerpts  From  City  Ordinances 8 

Women  Peace  (Officers 9 

Police    Planning 10 

Sousa  Heads  Sheriff's  Group 11 

Professor  of   Police 12 

Officer  of  the  Month 13 

Associated  Communications  Officers 14 

Oakland  Pay  Raise 15 

Pistol  Pointing 16 

That  We  Shall  Never  Forget 17 


Directory 


The  Editor  is  always  pleased  to  consider  articles  suitable  for  publication.  Con- 
tributions should  preferably  be  typewritten,  but  where  this  is  not  possible,  copy 
should  be  clearly  written.  Contributions  may  be  signed  with  a  "nom  de  plume." 
but  all  articles  must  bear  the  name  and  address  of  the  sender,  which  will  be 
treated  with  the  strictest  confidence.  The  Editor  will  also  be  pleased  to  consider 
photographs  of  officers  and  of  interesting  events.  Letters  should  be  addressed  to 
the  Editor. 


SAN  FRANCISCO  POLICE  DEPARTMENT 

Hall  of  Justice,  Kearny  and  Washington  Streets 

Telephone  SUtter  1-2020 

Radio  Short  Wave  Call  KMA-438 


Mayor,  Hon.  Elmer  E.  Robinson 


POLICE  COMMISSIONERS 

Regular  Meetings,  Wednesday,  2:00  p.m.,  Hall  of  Justrce 

Washington  I.  Kohnke,  President 686  Sacramento  Street 

Henry  C.  Maginn 315  Montgomery  Street 

J.  Warnock  Walsh 160  Montgomery  Street 

Sergeant  John  T.  Butler,  Secretary 
Room  104,  Hall  of  Justice 


CHIEF  OF  POLICE Michael  Gaffey 

DEPUTY  CHIEF  OF  POLICE Bernard  J.  McDonald 

Chief  of  Inspectors James  English 

Director  of  Traffic Jack  Eker 

Dept.  Sec'y... Captain  Michael  F.  FiTZPATRiCK....Hall  of  Justice 

District  Captains 

Central Daniel  McKlem 635  Washington   Street 

Southern Walter  Ames Fourth  and  Clara  Streets 

Mission Edward  Donohue 1240   Valencia    Street 

Northern Peter  Conroy 941    Ellis   Street 

Richmond Aloysius  O'Brien 451  Sixth  Avenue 

iNGLESiDE Leo  Tackney Balboa  Park 

Taraval August  G.   Steffen 2348  Twenty-fourth  Avenue 

Potrero Ted  Terlau 2300  Third  Street 

Golden  Gate  Park William  Danahy Stanyan  opp.  Waller 

Traffic Ralph  E.  Olstad Hall  of  Justice 

City  Prison Lt.  Walter  Thompson Hall  of  Justice 

Civilian  Defense George  Healy Hall  of  Justice 

Bur.  Inspectors Cornelius  Murphy Hall  nf  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Personnel John   A.   Encler Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of 

Criminology Francis  X.  Latulipb H»ll  of  Justice 

Director  -  Bureau  of 

Special  Services Otto  Meyer Hall  of  Justice 

Director  of  Juvenile  Bureau 2475  Greenwich  Street 

John  Meehan 

Director  -  Bureau  of  Criminal 

Information Lieut.  George  Hippely Hall  of  Justice 

Insp.  or  Schools 

Traffic  Control Insp.  Thomas  B.  Tract 

Supervising  Captain 

of  Districts Jeremiah  J.  Couchlin Hall  of  Justice 

Chinatown  Detail Lt.  H.  C.  Atkinson Hall  of  Justice 

Range  Master „ Pistol  Range,  Lake  Merced 

Emil  Dutil 


When  In  Trouble     Call  SUtteV  VZO'ZO 

When    In  Doubt  Always  At  Your  Service 


Page  2 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


June.  1953- 


Keep  California  Green  and  Golden 
Help  Prevent  Forest  Fires 


E.  J.  HJERTAGER  &  SON 

P.  O.  Box  715 

Yreka,  California 


SIERRA VILLE  LUMBER  CO. 

P.  O.  Box  11 

Sierraville,  California 


W.  D.  MILLER  LUMBER  CORP. 
Etna,  California 

RALPH  L.  SMITH  LUMBER  CO. 
Anderson,  California 


DIEBOLD  MILLS,  INC. 

P.  O.  Box  92 
Smith  River,  California 

BEN  MAST  LUMBER  CO. 

Laytonville,  California 


DURABLE  PLYWOOD  COMPANY 
P.  O.  Box  114 

Calpella,  California 
Phone  HO.  2-2981 

HOLLOW  TREE  REDWOOD  CO. 

Box  38 

Ukiah,  California 

Phone  HO.  2-3821 


DOLLY  VARDEN  LUMBER  CO. 

Areata,  California 

BLAGEN  LUMBER  CO. 

White  Pines,  California 

PLUMAS  BOX  CO.,  INC. 

P.  O.  Box  37 
Twain,  California 


Jiui,\  1953 


POLICE  AND  PEACE  OFFICERS'  JOURNAL 


Page  3 


"Efficient  Police 

Make  a  Land  of 

Peace" 


(Established  1922) 


The  Magazine 

Peace  Officers 

Read 

(Trade  Mark  Copyright) 


Vol.  XXVI 


JUNE,  1953 


No.  6 


OUR  PAROLE  PROBLEM 


Every  four  and  a  half  minutes  today, 
tomorrow  and  every  day  in  the  predict- 
able future,  a  criminal  will  commit  mur- 
den,  manslaughter,  rape  or  assault  to  kill 
somewhere  in  the  United  States.  Even 
more  shocking  than  the  mounting  crime 
rate  are  the  actual  prison  terms  served  by 
culprits  convicted  of  these  monstrous  of- 
fenses. F.B.I,  statistics  reveal  that  mur- 
derers, including  those  given  life  sen- 
tences, are  confined  for  a  median  term 
of  less  than  nine  years.  The  median 
prison  term  for  manslaughter  is  three 
years  and  three  months.  Rapists  are  kept 
behind  bars  only  three  years  and  two 
months. 

These  men,  and  nearly  two  million 
other  e.\-convicts  guilty  of  lesser  crimes, 
are  released  from  prison  on  parole  before 
they  have  completed  their  minimum  sen- 
tences. Few  laymen  know,  perhaps,  that 
practically  all  prisoners  in  state  and  Fed- 
eral institutions  are  granted  paroles,  in 
addition  to  time  off  for  good  behavior, 
which  cut  substantially  the  sentences  im- 
posed on  them.  Save  for  the  occassional 
incorrigible  who  is  a  chronic  trouble- 
maker or  a  professional  tough  guy,  the 
convict  whose  prison  term  is  not  reduced 
is  as  rare  as  the  legendary  crook  with  a 
heart  of  gold.  The  conscientious  citizens 
who  sit  on  state  parole  boards  are  keenly 
aware  of  their  responsibilities  to  society 
and  criminals.  It  is  not  their  fault  that 
the  present  parole  system  has  failed  dis- 
mally in  preventing  crime. 

Another  set  of  F.B.I,  statistics  points 
up  the  urgency  of  the  problem.  During 
the  first  half  of  1952,  more  than  one 
million  major  crimes  were  committed 
throughout  the  country.  In  that  period 
the  F.B.I,  received  423,214  sets  of  fin- 
gerprints of  people  arrested  by  state  and 
local  police — and  60.0  per  cent  already 
were  on  file  in  Washington  for  offenses 
of  a  serious  nature.  According  to  a  state- 


By  Edward  J.  Hickey 
Commissioner,  Connecticut  State  Police 

AS  TOLD  TO   STANLEY  FR.ANK 

Rfprintcd  hy  Special  Permission 
of  Elks  Magazine 


EDITOR'S   NOTE 

We  of  the  Police  and  Peace  Ofii- 
CERS'  JoiRNAL  realized  that  all  of 
Commissioner  Hickey's  words  are  not 
relevant  in  California;  however,  we 
do  feel  that  his  article  will  be  of  in- 
terest to  all  the  readers  of  this  maga- 
zine. 

Parole  has  long  been  a  problem  to 
everyone  connected  with  law  enforce- 
ment work.  It  is  less  than  a  year  since 
a  paroled  convict  took  the  life  of  Offi- 
cer Robert  Walters  in  San  Francisco. 
Only  last  month  Officer  Harold  Chap- 
man of  the  San  Jose  Police  Department 
was  sent  to  the  hospital  with  a  bullet 
wound  in  each  arm,  one  in  the  leg  and 
another  in  the  shoulder  as  the  result 
of  an  encounter  with  an  exconvict. 

These  incidents,  which  to  a  smaller 
degree  are  repeated  day  in  and  day 
out,  are  naturally  distressing  to  peace 
officers.  Chief  Ray  Blackmore  of  the 
San  Jose  Police  Department  had  quite 
a  bit  to  say  about  paroled  convicts 
after  Chapman  had  been  wounded. 

Still,  we  hold  the  highest  respect  for 
the  men  who  head  the  California  Adult 
Authority.  Certainly  no  man  in  Cali- 
fornia is  more  interested  in  the  welfare 
of  peace  officers  than  Charles  Dullea, 
a  former  San  Francisco  Chief  of  Po- 
l